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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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'Lives of great men all remind us 
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"Well, this is the end of a perfect day, 
Near the end of a journey too; 
But it leaves a thought that is big and strong. 
With a wish that is kind and true. " 

Carrie J. Bond 



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compassion and sacrifice and endurance. " 

William Faulkner 



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"There is no such thing as chance; And what 
seems to us merest accident springs from the 

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'Leadership and learning are indispensible to 

one another. " 



John Fitzgerald Kennedy 






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"Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born 

great, some achieve greatness, and some have 

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"Hope is itself a species of happiness, and, 
perhaps, the chief happiness which this world 

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Samuel Johnson 




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24 Current Events 





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Photos by R M Photo Service, Inc. 

Photos and Captions compiled by the Sub Turri 

Editorial Board 



The cry for peace grew stronger than ever. 
The civil fighting continued in Bosnia as did 
the UN's peacekeeping efforts. As the clock 
continued to tick toward another Presidential 
election, both old and new faces took center stage 
in the spotlight. Sports legends set new records 
and new recording artists won their way into our 
hearts. Local tragedies struck and long-time 
heroes were laid to rest as the events of the year 
came to a close. 




Current Events 25 



The civil war in the former Yugoslavia 
continued into its fourth year of 
destruction. There was still no peace in 
sight among the Croats, the Serbs, and the 
Muslims. More than 3 million people lost their 
homes, more than 200,000 have been killed, 
and tens of thousands have become refugees. 



Russian President Boris 
Yeltsin held on to a 
tentative first term as 
president. Yeltsin was 
hospitalized with heart trouble, 
but he didn't give- any early 
indication whether or not he 
would run for a second term. 




26 Current Events 






World-Wide Views 




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I he Palestinians, led by 
Yassar Arafat, and 
Israel reached a major 
agreement after months of 
negotiations. The agreement 
transferred control of the 
occupied West B ank to its Arab 
residents which has been held 
by Israel since the 1967 war. 



Returning to the United States for his 
fourth papal visit, Pope John Paul II 
landed in Newark, New Jersey. The 
75 year old Pope spoke of leading the Roman 
Catholic Church into Christianity's third 
millenium. 



Current Events 27 



Hitting Home 



Affirmative action 
plans began to get 
weaker as the 
Supreme Court issued 
decisions making it harder to 
justify giving minorities and 
women preferences in 
awarding federal contracts. It 
has been nearly three decades 
since affirmative action was 
implemented. 




RETREAT r 

fcrFIRHATIV 

A6TIQN 




This past year's hurricane season was 
the worst in recent memory, with many 
storms threatening the Atlantic coastal 
region. Luckily, many states escaped damage, 
yet the high frequency of storms kept weather 
forecasters busy at the National Hurricane 
Center. 







M+fieZvmr'-**- -.V-^- 



28 Current Events 





Mickey Mantle, one of the greatest 
baseball players who ever lived, 
died of fast-spreading liver cancer 
at the age of 63. Mantle died only two months 
after a liver transplant. In his 17 years in the 
major league, he inspired generations of fans 
with his power and ability. 



Timothy McVeigh and 
Terry Nichols were 
charged with 1 1 counts 
in the bombing of the Alfred P. 
Murrah Federal Building in 
Oklahoma City. The country 
was outraged by the explosion 
on April 19th which killed 169 
people including children, and 
injured more than 500. 



Current Events 29 




House Speaker Newt Gingrich, a 
Republican congressman from 
Georgia, rose to the heights of 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. He 
promised to overhaul more than a generation 
of social programs that began in the eras of the 
New Deal and the Great Society. 



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Not Guilty. The trial of 
the century is over. In 
a landmark decision, 
OJ Simpson was acquitted of 
murder charges in the deaths of 
his ex-wife, Nicole Brown 
S impson and Ronald Goldman . 
The jury, presided over by 
Judge Lance Ito, took less than 
four hours to decide the trial 
that lasted for eight months. 




30 Current Events 



People in the News 




Bill Gates 
revolutionalized the 
computer industry 
with the introduction of 
Windows '95, an upgrade to 
the Windows software 
program. The sales campaign, 
popularized by the music of 
the Rolling Stones, helped to 
make him the richest man in 
America. 



epublican Senate Majority 
Leader, Bob Dole from Kansas, 
a front-runner for the GOP 
nomination for the upcoming 1996 Presidential 
election. He is a conservative candidate who 
believes in cutting government spending and a 
balanced budget. 



Current Events 31 



In the Spotlight 



Hootie and the Blowfish 
became an instant hit 
with their single "Hold 
My Hand." But soon this South 
Carolina band with a mellow 
beat became a huge success 
with their debut album 
"Cracked Rear View" which 
sold millions of copies. 





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The Dave Matthews Band became a 
quick hit with the group' s second album 
"Under the Table and Dreaming." The 
album rocketed up the charts and the band 
played on tour for near-capacity crowds of 
excited fans. 




32 Current Events 




Three times as nice. Pete Sampras 
outlasted Andre Agassi to capture his 
third U.S. Open title and the No. 1 
ranking. Only two months earlier, Sampras 
had won his third straight Wimbledon 
Championships. 



The Philadelphia-based 
quartet of Boys II Men 
consisting of Wanya 
Morris, Shawn Stockman, 
Nathan Morris, and Michael 
McCary has been a presence 
on the top-selling charts for 
several years. Their style of 
pop combined with soul and 
rhythm and blues has struck a 
chord with listeners worldwide. 



Current Events 33 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Members of the Class of 1996: 



As Commencement approaches, you and I both close one chapter 
in the story of our relationship to Boston College. The Class of 
1996 is the twenty-fourth to whom I will be privileged to award 
Boston College degrees. 

One sentiment that has been a constant among the twenty -four 
classes is the pervasive happiness each class has enjoyed in 
their years as students at Boston College. 

The occasional visitor to campus might trace that happiness 
to the colorful surroundings we enjoy: gothic towers and bright 
minds, ceaseless activity and supportive friends. But in reality 
we create our own happiness much more than find it served to us. 
Graduates realize that these luminous surroundings were the 
setting for you to choose your own role in tracing new 
intellectual horizons, in offering the helping hand of a 
volunteer, in winning the confidence of friends and team mates in 
what you undertook and accomplished together. 

Tomorrow, the scenery changes. But if the stage is more 
expansive, I hope that the lights at center stage will be more 
inviting still. Memories of what you have accomplished at Boston 
College not only allow you higher hopes, they make of those hopes 
a promise of reality. 

What you and I accomplished at Boston College, we did not 
achieve alone. Fortunately we do not leave friends at Boston 
College; we do not leave God there. They accompany us to assure 
that higher hopes come true. 

Sincerely, 



(_ y J. Donald Monan, S.J. J 

President / 



34 President 




Elena K. ' 



J. Donald Monan, SJ. 
President 



President 35 




36 Academics 





Michael Wong 




Andrea Ritola and Biandi Stemerman 
Co-Editors 



Ever to Excel". Nowhere is this motto 
more apparent than in the academic 
life at Boston College. The ideals of a well- 
rounded core curriculum that the Jesuits 
founded over a hundred years ago is still 
firmly rooted inside the classroom. The 
resources extend past the lecture halls into 
hospitals and schools where students' hands- 
on knowledge was to be the most valuable 
lesson taught. The presence of academic 
excellence was felt in the beauty of Bapst, 
the Atrium in Fulton, and in the Organic 
Chemistry Labs in Merkert. With the 
determination of the students and the support 
of fine faculty, dreams of academic 
achievement attained new heights. 




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HEIGHTS 



Academics 37 



I 




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
(617)552-3271 



To the Class of 1996: 



This past year saw a rash of academic evaluations of American colleges 
and universities. The one that most lifted my heart was the one that is 
perhaps most meaningful to you, as the graduating Class of 1996. For the 
first time, there appeared a special ranking of "national universities" 
according to the success of their commitment to undergraduate teaching. Not 
far behind such giants as Dartmouth, Stanford and the University of Chicago 
stood Boston College at number sixteen, just ahead of our elder sister 
institution across the Charles River! Now the rest of the academic world 
knows what we have known for some time, that Boston College is one of the 
finest teaching institutions in the country. And you can say, with 
justifiable pride, that this level of distinction was achieved "on your 
watch . " 

If Boston College itself is full of honors this year, so is this 
graduating class. Yours has been an accomplished class, which began its time 
at Boston College full of promise — which has been wonderfully fulfilled. Your 
academic accomplishments are well attested to by the number who have appeared 
on the Dean's List, at the Dean's Scholars' Dinner, and as Scholars of the 
College — and all of you have fulfilled your intellectual potential in 
significant ways. In addition, your commitment to the service of others has 
been generous and wholehearted. You have helped in many ways to build up the 
strong and caring community we cherish here at Boston College. 

There have been many changes during the four years of your undergraduate 
career— new ideas, new buildings, new academic programs--but with all the 
changes, there are dimensions of Boston College that do not change. There is 
the same sense of intellectual challenge and excitement, the same strong sense 
of community for which Boston College is celebrated, the same commitment to 
the service of others in the Jesuit tradition. 

Boston College will surely continue to change — as any institution 
must — but it will remain, in its essentials, what it has always been. When 
you return to visit, as I hope you will do often, you will see changes as the 
years go by, but we trust it will always be what it has been for you: a 
community founded on faith in God, on loving concern for one another, and on 
the sense of our larger responsibilities to the world around us. 

As alumni and alumnae of Boston College, you will carry the light of 
faith and love wherever you go, and we know that the world will be a better, 
more just, more caring place because of what you bring to it — in your work, in 
your family lives, and in your community. May the Lord bring you and all your 
loved ones peace and joy for all the years to come ! 




J. Robert Barth, S.J. 
Dean 



SCHOOL of ARTS & SCIENCES 



i8 College of Arts and Sciences 







Elena K- Vizvarv 



J. Robert Barth, SJ. 
Dean 



College of Arts and Sciences 39 



ARTS & SCIENCES 



The art of an invaluable foundation 

for expanding education 

From History to Physics, Psychology to Philosophy, the 
College of Arts and Sciences offers a wide range of 
opportunities for students wishing to explore 
humanities, sciences, or the artistic aspects of Boston College. 
The goal is to provide each of its students with a solid, liberal 
arts education. This not only serves to widen the horizons and 
broaden the perspectives of those enrolled, but it also gives 
them a strong foundation on which to build their future 
studies. 

Each student in the College of Arts and Sciences must 
successfully complete a diverse Core curriculum of fifteen 
classes including two semesters of Philosophy, Theology, and 
History. The student must also reach a proficiency level in a 
foreign language. This is only part of what separates Boston 
College's Arts and Sciences program from other universities. 
Upon fulfilling this core, the student chooses one of the thirty- 
one majors offered and fulfills the respective course 
requirements for that major. Many other programs and 
options are available. For example, a student may opt to take 
on more than one major, to chose an independent major, or to 
choose a minor in addition to a major. The Honors program 
gives highly motivated students another venue in which they 
can express their views in an interactive classroom setting. 

After successfully completing the required number of 
classes and credits, students receive either a Bachelor of Arts 
degree or a Bachelor of Science degree, depending on the 
major. The knowledge and experience that students have 
gained through their four years in the College of Arts and 
Sciences are invalueable long after leaving the Heights. 

-Michele Debreceni 



Top right: Students hard at work in a Chemistry class. 

Right: It may look like bartending class, but it really is a lecture on the 
properties of liquids. 




N-*^-. 



40 Arts & Sciences 




THE WALLACE E. CARROLL SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN 




Dear Friends, 

It goes without saying that this is a bittersweet time for you. You have 
accomplishments to be celebrated and you deserve to be proud of how you have 
changed, but there are altogether too many good-byes that come with this celebration. 

Next September will be very different from the last few because you will be in a 
new world, a new part of your life. In years to come this book will bring back 
Septembers and many good memories, most real and a few polished by time. At best it 
will help recall individuals, some who only touched you lightly, some who gave you a 
big hug, some whom you will see for fifty years and more at weddings and funerals. I 
hope you open these pages of memory often and that each time the good times appear 
better. 

This was a good time to be at Boston College. The one essential idea at the center 
of what we teach at this University is that life is good. It is our responsibility to 
understand this and to live it by bringing glory to the world, prosperity to others as well 
as to ourselves, to create sustenance for many, and to share. 

These old stones, even ones newly set, on a small hill just west of St. Botolph's 
town will miss you. And stones have a long, hard memory. Please come back and 
share what you have become while you always bring peace and prosperity to many 
lives. 



Yours, 




John J. Neuhauser 
Dean 



CARROLL SCHOOL of MANAGEMEN'. 



Carroll School of Management 





Elena K. Vizvarv 



John J. Neuhauser 
Dean 



Wallace E. Carroll School of Management 43 




MANAGEMENT 



Educating tomorrow's business 

leaders today 

The Wallace E. Carroll School of Management began at 
Boston College in 1938, as the College of Business 
Administration. Today the name may be different, but 
the school's management offices and classes are once again 
located in the newly renovated Fulton Hall. The building not 
only has a new exterior, but new facilities to be utilized by 
undergraduate and graduate students alike. 

In order for management students to obtain their 
Bachelor of Science degree, they must complete the University 
Core required of all students, along with twelve School of 
Management courses, and between four and six courses in 
their chosen concentration. Classes in the eight concentrations 
offered- Accounting, Computer Science, Economics, Finance, 
General Management, Human Resources Management, 
Marketing, or Operations and Strategic Management, usually 
begin in a student's junior year. Students participating in the 
CSOM Honors program must also complete an additional two 
courses. 

Classes in the School of Management emphasize 
group work and team projects in order to better prepare 
students for the ever-changing international business 
environment. 

Kristin E. Lane 







f ' Jl 




44 School of Management 



jm 





SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
CAMPION HALL 101 
(617) 552-4200 
(617) 552-OSI2 Fax 



To the Class of 1996: 

Graduation is both an exit and an entrance. Your exit from Boston College 
means you are leaving a special place of caring and intellectual challenge and 
excitement. But you leave having enriched us by your personal gifts and talents, 
which have graced our community of learners and scholars the past four years. 
Through your academic accomplishments, leadership, generosity of spirit, and 
service to others you have placed your mark on the School of Education and the 
university. We have been grateful for your presence. 

At graduation I am sure the question for many of you is "How far will I go?" 
Sometime later in life the question will be "When it is over, what will my life have 
been about?" The answer to the second question is embedded in your commitment 
to serve others through the calling of education and human services. You have 
acquired the knowledge, skills, understanding and values which have prepared you 
to render service which is liberating. You will make a difference in the lives of 
children and families and you will make the world a better place. 

Your departure from Boston College is an entry into a complex, challenging, 
changing and chaotic world. As you enter that world I hope you will be sustained in 
courage and nourished in grace by the memories and values of Boston College 
where you have lived, changed, and grown. Your passage through the School of 
Education has been marked by the joy of accomplishment, the warmth of close 
friendships, and personal and professional challenge. Cherish the memories of good 
times, friendships, and accomplishment. Remember the faculty, staff, and 
administrators who have been privileged to be your teachers, mentors, and friends. 

As you enter the ranks of Boston College's distinguished alumni and 
alumnae, we wish you good beginnings. We wish you successful and fulfilling lives 
of purpose, faith, service, and achievement. Congratulations! 

Sincerely, 



Gerald J. Pine 
Dean 




^>out 



SCHOOL of EDUCATION 



46 School of Education 




Elena K.Vizvaiy 



Gerald J. Pine 
Dean 



<* 



'#■ 



School of Education 



EDUCATION 



Working towards building a 

better community 

Redefining education and teaching future generations 
are the main focuses of the School of Education. As 
students trained to become educators, they learned 
hands-on knowledge through experiences in the school district 
in Boston and surrounding communities. 

Students traveled to communities such as Newton or 
Dorchester and entered classrooms from preschool to high 
school to learn how to implement skills learned in the classroom. 
Students were required to take pre-practicums in both their 
sophomore and junior years as well as a full practicum their 
senior year. In their practicum, they planned and implemented 
their own lesson with input from the teacher and direct contact 
with the children. 

Campion Hall is also the location for the Campus 
School where many handicapped children attend every day. 
On beautiful days, you can find the children outside on the 
playground which is designed to fill their needs. 

Students participating in the School of Education 
learned the skills and patience as well as the academic 
knowledge that it takes to become a successful teacher of 
tomorrow. 

Brandi E. Stemerman 




WMm. 




Above: Looking through the swings on the playground of the Campy 
School. 

Above Far Right: Student teacher Sarah Saelinger, and her first grade claJJ 
are all smiles for the camera. 

Opposite Right: This "non-circulating" skeleton is just one of the madi 
teaching aids available to School of Education Students in the Educationji 
Resource Center. (ERC) 



48 School of Education 



=lf 







of Education 491 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
(617) 552-4251 

Dear SON Graduating Class of 1996: 

Congratulations on your graduation and on your achievements during your 
time at Boston College. You were the first class I helped recruit, and the 
number of you who enrolled certainly made me look successful. It has been a 
delight to watch you grow from high school students, unsure of what college 
would mean to you, to graduates ready to move into your professional roles. 
You have practiced skills in the lab, studied the science of nursing, and 
cared for patients in some of the nation's most highly respected clinical 
agencies. You have learned to work with people experiencing the joy of birth, 
the fear of an uncertain future, and the sadness of death. You have cared for 
the poorest of the poor in Ecuador, as well as the affluent at Newton- 
Wellesley Hospital. 

Change has marked your passage through Boston College. You have 
changed, the world has changed, and health care delivery in the United States 
is undergoing massive change which will have profound effects on your 
profession. When you arrived, a national debate on health care reform was 
underway. The focus of the debate was how to provide cost-effective quality 
health care to all. Although a national approach has not materialized, major 
shifts have occurred, driven too often by economic, rather than quality 
considerations. Substantial reductions in the number of hospital beds has led 
to a decrease in the number of opportunities for staff nurses in acute care 
hospitals. At the same time, opportunities have increased for nurses in roles 
outside of the acute care setting. These new roles demand nurses who are 
educated to be critical thinkers, working in highly complex environments. 
Opportunities for nurses with Master's degrees are increasing, and I encourage 
you to consider continuing your education to become a nurse with advanced 
practice skills. There is also a great need for research on new methods of 
health care delivery and thus a great need for doctorally prepared nurses. 

Obviously, the challenges are great, but with challenge comes 
opportunity. Projections indicate that there will be a serious shortage of 
baccalaureate prepared nurses early in the next century. Your education at 
Boston College has provided you not only will skills specific to the 
profession of Nursing, but also with a liberal arts core based on the Jesuit 
tradition which emphasizes the importance of the principle of justice. 
Ethical decision making has been a consistent theme throughout your 
curriculum. This foundation should enable you to be leaders in shaping a new 
health care delivery system for the Twenty-First Century. 

We are all proud of you and know that you will make us even prouder in 
the future. Your best legacy to the School is your continued striving for 
excellence in your profession and in your lives. 

May God bless you, your parents, and loved ones as you leave Boston 
College to commence the next phase of your lives. 

Sincerely, 



Barbara Hazard Munro, Ph.D., F.A.A.N 
Dean and Professor 



SCHOOL of NURSING 



School of Nursing 







Elenn K.Vizvary 



Barbara Hazard Munro, Ph.D., F.A.A.N 

Dean 



School of Nursing 51 



NURSING 



Health-care training keeps pace with the 
advances of modern medicine 

A career in the Health services, no doubt requires an 
unlimited dedication to people, and patience to help 
them with care and compassion. These traits are characteristic 
of students attending the School of Nursing. 

Founded in 1 947, the Boston College School of Nursing 
is one of the best Nursing Schools in the Nation, with a 
competitve program that places strict emphasis on training 
both scholastically in campus courses and labs, but also on- 
site training in Boston's health-care institutions. Experienced 
professors provide students with the personal attention needed 
in order to fulfill the demanding curriculum. Courses cover 
caring for people of all ages, and preventive medicine. Students 
are trained to treat not only specific medical problems, but the 
needs of the patient as a whole. Classes in the School of 
Nursing stress the need for critical thinking and good judgment 
in a clinical setting. 

The School of Nursing is a pre-professional program 
in an undergraduate setting. Students graduate with both a 
bachelor's degree in science, and clinical experience from 
working in local hospitals, which are among the most advanced 
health-care centers in the United States. 

-Andrea J. Ritola 



Top left: Many instructors in the 
School of Nursing are Registered 
Nurses. They realize the 
importance of learning the body 
and its functions for the nursing 
field. 

Right: Students listen attentively 
and take many notes in their 
lecture classes. 





152 School of Nurshu 



Michael W<ft<| 




Michael Wons 



School of Nursing 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167 



EVENING COLLEGE OF ARTS, SCIENCES 
AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
(617) 552-3900 



To the Class of 1996: 

Great joy and accomplishment are yours as you celebrate graduation. The talent, 
commitment and optimism you brought to studies will now be channeled in different 
directions, shared in new ways. You are ready. 

You are prepared to question, to seek answers and to respond. Having anchored your 
knowledge, convictions and attitudes in vigilant sympathy for others which is the essence 
of moral engagement, life's many changes will now always be examined in a defined 
context. 

You own the greatest human freedom: to choose your own attitude in any given 
circumstance. To secure your opinions under extreme conditions when there is no 
chance of changing them is the highest expression of personal autonomy. 

Unlimited challenges await your response. Maximize every opportunity optimistically 
and with humor. For sixty-seven years, graduates of the Evening College have gone 
forth into a world of upheaval and advanced the noblest human cause: freedom and 
moral concern for others. 



Prayerful best wishes for all the years ahead. 



Sincerely yours, 

James A. Woods, SJ. 
Dean 






= 



= 



, 



EVENING COLLEGE 



ening College 







Elena K. Vizvary 



James A. Woods, SJ. 
Dean 



Evening College 55 



EVENING COLLEGE 

Eager to pursue the challenges 

of the future 

The class of 1996 heralds 67 successful years of the 
Boston College Evening college. We are proud to be 
a part of the rich academic tradition, the fellowship, 
the friendships and the community that is the Boston College 
Evening College. Our diverse faculty and classmates offered 
intellectual challenges and varied life and work experiences 
which stimulated our classes and inculcated a love of learning. 
We gained the knowledge, explored novel insights 
and developed an awareness of an excitement for the 
undiscovered. Our increased confidence and evolving 
philosophy of life leaves an indelible mark. Our intellectual 
and spiritual growth, our Boston College experience, including 
the support and enthusiasm of Father Woods, the Evening 
College staff and professors, equips us to pursue the challenges 
of the future. 

Congratulations to this year's graduating class. The 
realization of a dream has triumphed. 
"We turn not older with years, but newer every day." 

-Emily Dickinson 

Sally Spiegel and Mary Gens 
Evening College Class of ' 96 




\ 



Above Right: Professors in the 
Evening College provide 
opportunities to students 
wishing to continue their 
education. 

Right:Term papers and exams 
are always challenging. 




BAPST 



A place of tranquility admist the 

chaos of academic life 

The silence is deafening. But in this silence, there is 
serenity and a pure sense of ideal academia. To 
escape the chaos of dorm life or the more sociable 
O'Neill Library, many students seek refuge in the tranquility 
of Bapst Library. 

Once inside, there is an overwhelming feeling of 
amazement in Gargan Hall, which is the main reading room 
of Bapst. The Gothic architecture and stained glass windows 
are hints of its history while the stacks of books contain their 
histories. These stacks include collections of fiction used 
everyday by students and faculty alike. 

The beauty also lies beneath the ground level inside 
the basement where the Art Library is found. But the most 
impressive is the Burns Library, which can be accessed by 
way of Commonwealth Avenue. The Burns Library houses 
the Rare Books Collection where priceless works are kept. 

Useful and treasured, Bapst Library is perfect for the 
student interested in beauty and history, or a student wishing 
to contemplate in a peaceful setting. 

Michael Joel 





O'NEILL 

Multimedia library serves to meet 

academic needs of students 

Located just across from Gasson Hall, at the gateway to 
Lower Campus, is perhaps one of the most popular 
academic spots at Boston College-O'Neill Library. 
Whether it is just to peruse the stacks, or to read a class 
assignment put on reserve, O'Neill Library serves many 
students and faculty each day. 

A multi-purpose institution, the library houses not 
only numerous volumes, but microfiche and government 
documents as well. In addition, there is also a video center for 
viewing those films accidentally missed in class. Classrooms 
are located on the second level, and there are many study 
rooms students like to reserve in advance for the exam-time 
crunch. 

For those who need to find information for their paper 
and don't know where to look, there are plenty of O'Neill 
employees available at the reference desk to lead a hand and 
help direct the needy student to the information they need. 

O'Neill is more than just a library, it is a multimedia 
gathering center for the many students who attend BC. While 
it may not be quiet, there is no doubt, that you can find what 
you're looking for when you come to O'Neill. 

Andrea J. Ritola 








Above: This student i 
reference section to find 
paper. 



Top Left: O'Neill Libraif 
everyone, even a nice 
pigeons. 



has something for 
roosting spot for local 



Far Left: Students can 
information system to loca 
sources. 



Left: Most of all, O'Neill hpjs plenty of cubicles 
for studying. 



Brandi E. Stemerman 



Q 



browsing in the 
nformation for his 



use the QUEST 

e books and other 









Neill Library 61 



ADC 



Tutoring center helps students 

excel in academic Lite 



Just one of the many academic services offered to Boston 
College students, is the ADC. If you are having trouble 
understanding a concept, or perhaps an entire class, The 
Academic Development Center was created to help tutor 
students, and offer assistance to those who need it. 

Conveniently located in O'Neill library, and at no 
cost, students can come in and sign up for the help they might 
need. There is no limit on assistance, as tutoring may range 
from a few sessions to the whole semester. Tutoring is 
available in anything from Math courses to the History Core, 
as subjects offered include a wide number of the available 
course offerings to students. 

While a tutor can't take that exam for you, they can 
help you to get the attention and direction that you might need, 
which may just be enough to help get you through that tough 
and incomprehensible class. It is just as important to them that 
you come away with a better understanding of the concept 
than you had before, and feel more confident to take that test. 
Their patience and dedication to the student serve as testament 
to the motto "Ever to Excel". 

Andrea J. Ritola 




£ ■ 



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6 




K 



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Hi, 








Top Right: There is always help 
available in the OCF, all you need to 
do is ask. 

Right: Taking a stretch break from 
writing that end of the semester paper. 



62 AcademicDevelopment Ctr. 




Hindi E. Stem 



O'Neill Computing Facilit] 

Boston College accelarates on the 

Information Highway 



^C% 




Number one hundred and twenty one for a Mac," the 
voice boomed into the intercom. For those without their 
own personal computer, O'Neill Computing Facility is 
a convenience, with the long rows of computer terminals. For 
those pressured to finish term papers near exam time, OCF can 
be a lifesaver. But even the most patient person can be tested with 
waits that can last for hours. 

With the emphasis on AGORA and the information 
highway, OCF had to adapt even more so to the needs of the 
students. AGORA became a daily part of students' lives and 
vocabularies. After a somewhat chaotic beginning, students 
agreed that the benefits of such a project outweighed any 
inconveniences. Every student had an E-mail account, so there 
became a demand for more E-mail stations at OCF. They also 
expanded to include more Macintosh computer terminals. 

Brandi E. Stemerman 




Left: A tutor helping to explain an 
important concept. 



Brandi E. Stemerman 



O'Neill Computing Facility 63 






FOREIGN STUDY 

Enhancing education through 

cultural exchange 

There is a lot more to education, than just what one 
learns in the classroom. It is with this idea in mind, that 
each year more than three hundred students, mostly 
juniors and a few seniors choose to spend part of their Boston 
College education abroad. 

Students choosing to pursue a foreign study program 
gain a valuable experience in addition to being able to break 
away from the usual BC academic and social scene. Their trip 
no doubt endows them with a better appreciation of other 
cultures, their own, and just what defines education as a 
whole. 

The Foreign Study Office, under the direction of 
Professor James F. Flagg, located in Gasson Hall, helps to 
place and arrange programs with other schools across the 
globe. While the most popular places for education abroad 
happen to be Italy, France, or Spain, there are the occasional 
arrangements made for such exotic and exciting places as 
Morocco or Australia. 

Studying abroad means usually requires special 
arrangements for some of the courses required in the major. 
Every effort is made to allow students that wish to study 
abroad to be able to do so. There are a number of programs well 
established between BC and other countries which cater to 
their specific program, and allows them to fulfill credits in 
order to take advantage of the program. One such example is 
in the School of Education where students are able to arrange 
student teaching abroad to fulfill their BC practicum 
requirements, as an addition to their classes. 

Whatever the program might be, the experience of 
studying abroad, no doubt leaves a strong impression on 
anyone who has the opportunity to take part in the program. 



Andrea J. Ritola 





Left: Look mom, I can 
study students atop 
Queenstown. New Zealan 



Photo Courtesy of Shawonna Sisca 



Foreign 



ather fbr a picture in front 
I he main avenue of 



ki! Two Foreign 
Remail :able Mountain, in 



Study Abroad 65 



HONOR SOCIETIES 



Recognizing distinctive achievements 
in academics & service 

Boston College's numerous honor societies aim to 
foster recognition of those students who have 
demonstrated exceptional academic talents, coupled 
with service to the community. 

One such group is the Golden Key Society, which 
focuses on the excellence which signifies some of this nation' s 
most intelligent students. Lifetime membership is on an 
invitation only basis, with a number of scholarships available 
for deserving juniors and seniors. 

"Scholarship, Loyalty, and Service" is the motto of 
Alpha Sigma Nu, the national honor society of Jesuit colleges 
and universities. To be considered, students must maintain at 
least a 3.0 GPA, and be in the top 15 percent of their class. In 
addition, eligibility is based on only four percent of the junior 
and senior class at any school . Since service is a condition of 
membership, as students are expected to continue those 
activities that they participated in prior to acceptance. 

The Order of the Cross and Crown, restricted to the 
senior class, requires a 3.5 or above average and active 
involvement at BC. Chosen by a committee under direction 
of Fr. Barth, these students exemplify the qualities of service 
and academic excellence. A few of the selected students are 
designated Marshals of the Cross and Crown, and the student 
chosen as Chief Marshal is given the honor of speaking at the 
Arts & Sciences commencement. 

The highest recognition one can receive in the field of 
business is to be inducted into Beta Gamma Sigma. In order 
to be considered, requirements mandate a ranking in the top 
seven percent of the junior, or ten percent of the senior class. 
The three goals of this society are: To reward an encourage 
scholarship through the selection of outstanding students, to 
promote advancement of education in business through awards 
and recognition of outstanding institutions and chapters, and 
to foster integrity in the conduct of business operations. 




66 Honor Societies 





Top Right: This year's Golden Key Society inductees and their guests 
listen attentively to the speaker. 

Right: Vice President for Student Affairs, Kevin Duffy, receives an 
honoary degree from the President of the Golden Key Society. 




Brandi E. Stemerman 




MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS] 

Exhibits strive to enrich the 

academic experience 

The BC Fine Arts Museum caters not only to students and 
faculty members, but also enriches the appreciation of 
art by the greater Boston Community. 

Located in Devlin Hall, the state of the art museum 
occupies two floors and contains such amenities as moveable 
walls, and a main gallery, spanning both floors, in which larger 
works can be displayed. 

In addition to the many visiting exhibitions hosted by the 
University each year, BC has its own permanent collection, 
consisting of works from Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Each 
work displayed is accompanied by text detailing its historical 
significance and background. 

Striving in its mission to educate, all exhibits publish 
educational works, in the form of books and pamphlets, which 
are available to the public . The Fine Arts Museum is just another 
of the many ways BC attempts to unite culturewith education for 
the benefit of society. 

Andrea J. Ritola 






Brandi E. Stemerman 



Left: The Boston College Museum of Art, in 
Devlin Hall, hosts numerous exhibits of interest 
to young and old alike. 

Museum of Fine Arts 67 



— 



CAREER CENTER 

Helping BC students to take 

the next step towards the future 

After four years of hard work and dedication, it all 
comes down to finding your place in life. Whether 
its writing a resume, finding an internship, or 
scheduling an interview, the Career Center is the place that 
helps facilitate the transition from academic life to the work 
force. 

Always willing to help, the employees are experts in 
their craft. Career counselors and SIGI, a computer program, 
help students who are unsure about their future plans. They are 
the ones that make dreams come true not only for the 
upperclassmen by assisting them in job placcement, but also 
for the underclassmen who are interested in getting a head 
start with internships. 

Though the Career Center aids in this ardurous process, 
the student must take the first step. The Career Center is open 
year-round for students' convenience. And the valuable 
information gathered here can be the key to success for any 
student wishing to open the door of opportunity. 

Michael Joel 




> ' :, -^Vtt& 



SIGI 

G*npu«Tt*<l 




Branch E. Slemurm* 




ff^vi?Ai ■ — 



Brandi E. Stememian 



Left: The Career Center, located at 38 Comm. Ave, 
serves many students as their link to life after BC. 

Bottom Far Left: SIGI, a computerized Career 
guidence program, helps students narrow their 
occupational direction. 

Below: The Career Center has information on many 
employment opportunities, including internships, 
available for student perusal. 




Brandi E. Stemerman 



Career Center 69 



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Elena K. Vizvary 




70 Student Life 




Elena K. Vizvary 




Barbara Restaino, Editor 



From tailgating to tennis, Boston College 
students proved that college life was more 
than just academics. With the heart of Boston at 
our doorstep, we explored the excitement beyond 
main gate. On campus we shared the memories of 
the holidays, laughed with Adam Sandler, and 
danced the night away at Homecoming. Whether 
it was the first experience as a freshman, or the 
final celebration with senior friends, the moments 
that we've shared will not soon be forgotten, and 
the friendships that we will always take with us, 
have brought the meaning of "student life" to 
new heights. 




Student Life 71 



Driving in through the main gate, under a balcony of 
massive trees and surrounded by Gothic buildings on either side, 
your focus immediately falls upon the golden eagle perched 
below Gasson tower, seeming to protect us from harm. This 
scene is one of the most famous of our university, appearing in 
its summer glory or winter whites in almost every piece of 
literature Boston College produces. It, in essence, provides the 
feeling of coming home to a safe and comfortable community 
every time we return to school. 

But while that part of campus provided a sense of beauty 
and homecoming, all the other areas of our home away from 
home also gave us the same security and sense of beauty. This 
was seen all the way from upper campus, which provided most 
freshmen with their first memories and down to the party land of 
the Mods which gave seniors their last opportunity for a wild and 
carefree time. From the peaceful sprawling green (or brown) of 
the dustbowl, to the energy filled Alumni Stadium, the BC 
campus offered each and everyone of us the perfect place to 
grow, change, and call home. 

Our campus, therefore, is more than just beautiful green 
lawns, a golden eagle, the dorms we live in, and the buildings 
where we study and learn. It' s the place that gives us the feeling 
of home whenever we return. It allows us to feel comfortable in 
our daily lives and feel as if we have always belonged. It is this 
campus that we will carry with us as we remember our Boston 
College years and all the memories that we've made. 

Laura Needham '99 




72 Campus 



n > 



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Far Left: Magestic Gasson Hall towers over the rest o: 

Left: Moving into the dorms in September is always 
Campus. 

Below: "Wait for me!" shouts a BC student after the b 

Bottom Left: A student enjoys his solitary lunch outsi 




^■r cr 




73 



Right: A student flips through 
posters on the Dustbowl as the 
vendor fixes his tent. 

Below: The O'Neill Library steps 
are a popular place to relax bet ween 
classes and chat with friends. 

Bottom Right: A student checks 
her agenda in front of the recently 
renovated Fulton Hall. 




74 Campus 



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^ustbowling 



The Dustbowl has always been a mainstay in every 
Boston College student's life. On a warm sunny day, it is the 
place to chat with friends, have a picnic lunch, catch some rays, 
or toss around a Frisbee. It's where students go to see other 
people and to be seen themselves. It's always full of people for 
it's the perfect gathering place in between classes or for passing 
friends as they follow their daily schedule. 

Of all the places on campus, none encompasses so many 
segments of our student body as the Dustbowl, from freshmen 
walking down from upper campus, to the upperclassmen dreading 
the trek down to lower. Here you can also find colorful signs and 
sheets promoting every kind of activity and club that exists on 
campus shouting out to the student body to get involved. 

Many of the traditional annual activities at Boston College 
also occur on the dustbowl. Perhaps one of the most awaited is 
the Pre-school Fest which welcomes freshmen and the returning 
upperclassmen in a day of fun before the start of the school year. 
Another yearly Dustbowl tradition is Student Activities Day, 
which allows both new and returning students the chance to get 
involved in student organizations. 

Though the Dustbowl has always seemed unchanging, 
dramatic changes are in its future, due to the construction of a 
new student center. But the real meaning of the Dustbowl will 
never change. For on this land that we first made our friends 
freshman year and said good-bye to them senior year, we have 
lived and learned, making the Dustbowl an area that has 
contributed to our memories forever. 

Laura Needham '99 




Elena K. Vizvali 



76 Dustbowl 




Elena K. Vizvary 




Elena K. Vizvary 

Top Left: The music on the dustbowl 
inspires these students get up and 
groove to the beat. 

Far Left: Two students urge others 
to get involved in BC activities. 

Above: Which one of these gladiators 
will be knocked down first? 

Left: Taking advantage of the good 
weather, these students enjoy chilling 
out on the Dustbowl. 



Elena K. Vizvary 







Dustbowl 77 






£agles on the Warpath 



Maroon, gold, and white... these colors make up a good 
part of a Boston College student's wardrobe. We wear these 
colors, not because they make us look taller or thinner, but 
because we are proud of our school. How many times have you 
smiled with pride when a random person, seeing your BC 
sweatshirt, hat, scrunchie, or socks, taps you on the shoulder 
saying, "Oh, you go to BC?!!" 

How about when you hear that someone from your high 
school is thinking about applying to BC? This person (who you 
had to look up in your yearbook) suddenly becomes your best 
friend. There is a unique bond between BC students — past, 
present and future — that just can't be explained. 

If you ever took the time to scan the crowd at any major 
sporting event, you saw an ocean of BC T-shirts and white hats 
all sporting our favorite logo. During time-outs, you saw fans 
dancing and cheering along with the cheerleaders and the 
Screaming Eagles Marching Band. But the most awesome sight 
was the students waving their pom poms madly in sync. These 
plastic strings of maroon and gold with the game' s sponsor on the 
handle were not merely just for waving when we scored a 
touchdown or dunked the basketball. These provided us with 
something to play with during time-outs, something to chew on 
when the game was down to the wire, and best of all, a souvenir 
of our BC Pride. 

Robyn Winters '97 




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78 BC Pride 



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Far Left: Now here's a really 
dedicated BC fan.' I 

Bottom Left: The awesome BC 

crowd cheers on their team. 

Left: Three friends show off their 
maroon and gold painted nails. 

Below: There's nothing like good 
friends, some pom poms, and a BC 
football game. 









'■ 




Bccca Rees 



BC Pride 79 



"The Tailgating Tradition 



The cars are packed into every available inch of parking 
space within three miles of campus. Beer and other beverages of 
choice are being consumed for breakfast. The Mods are as active 
as a Saturday night, but it's Saturday morning. What else could 
this be but one of the favorite activities of Boston College 
students and alumni — tailgating. 

If you lived on Lower Campus, the dull roar of the Mods 
woke you up before you normally would for a day of classes. No 
one really minded being woken up at the crack of dawn because 
it meant that you could start tailgating! "The earlier, the better!" 
seems to be the motto of tailgaters. 

Tailgating before the football game is not simply drinking 
a few beers in your car a few minutes before the game. At our 
fine institution, it is a tradition... a talent... an art. Although there 
are only five or six opportunities a year to do so, many students, 
parents and alumni have perfected this art. Arriving hours before 
the game, people lucky enough to get blue chip parking set up 
shop. They decorate their cars with balloons, broomsticks, 
inflatable animals and other various markers to distinguish their 
car from the other hundreds on Shea Field. Die hard tailgaters 
don't just grill up hamburgers and hot-dogs on their hibachis. 
The feasts prepared beat the dining hall any day. Of course any 
tailgate would not be complete without full coolers of soda and 
beer to wash it all down. 

And if our beloved football team does not seem to be 
faring well, the parking lot calls again somewhere between half- 
time and the third quarter. 

When a BC fan says that they are "going to the football 
game," you can be sure that it will be an all day event — a 
tradition that has been perfected throughout the years. 

Robyn Winters '97 




Miry Kdlet 



80 Tailgating 




Tailgai ... 31 



Jiead of the Class 



Why do members of the Boston College crew team wake 
up at 5:30 in the morning to go rowing? There is no reason in the 
world other than the fact that they have caught the rowing bug. 
Once you catch it, you cannot get rid of it. Rowing is a love and 
a way of life. It is a mental sport that exercises your entire body. 
To compete, you must be both physically and psychologically 
fit. 

The Head of the Charles is the ultimate head race in 
American rowing. This year over 250, 000 spectators gathered 
along the banks of the Charles River to watch the 3 1 st running 
of the Head. It is a three mile course which begins at the Boston 
University boathouse and ends at Herter Park on Soldiers Field 
Road, Cambridge. The Head is the world's largest single-day 
rowing event. A boat is run every ten seconds in single file from 
7:50 in the morning until 4:15 in the afternoon. Over 4,500 
athletes competed this year. For BC crew, the men' s lightweight 
eight finished 12th of 32, and the women's championship eight 
placed 24th of 33 boats. 

The Charles River has a charm that is derived from the 
long tradition of rowing in Boston. Spectators cherish the fact 
that the rowers are in it only for the love of the sport and 
competition. The elegant visual aesthetics of a shell gliding 
across the water in perfect swing draws crowds. This elegance 
though is not seen by the rowers themselves. All they know are 
the sensations of pain and adrenaline and the coxswain's voice 
driving them to pull harder. 

Jennifer Raterman '99 




82 Head of the Charles 




-r-^ 



Stephen J. Antonik 




Far Left: BC men's lightweight 
eight push themselves to the limit. 

Above: These ducks sun themselves 
on the river far enough away from the 
action. 

Left: A women's eight slices through 
the water past the cheering crowds 
and press. 

Top Left: A single rower gracefully 
glides past the colorful trees along 
the banks of the Charles River. 









Head of the Charles 83 



Pocahontas, Socrates, and a T driver are walking down 
the street. They come upon a curious-looking house and ring the 
doorbell, only to be greeted by a giant condom accompanied by 
a 6-foot baby boy, clad only in diapers and a bonnet. The two 
freaks invite our heroes in for a drink, and the oddities they see 
are almost inexplicable. 

They follow their hosts through a hallway, passing a 
gang of Martians. The Men from Mars point their disintegrating 
lasers at the three newcomers, but are soon distracted by a pair 
of hula dancers. They reach the kitchen, where an overgrown 
girl scout offers them a strange orange drink in a tiny tiny cup off 
a tray. Not to be rude, our heroes accept the drinks. Socrates, the 
bravest of the three, tries to take a sip, but the beverage seems to 
defy the laws of gravity. 

"Is it poison?" asks Pocahontas. 

"Is it foul-tasting?" asks the T driver. 

"No, it' s alive ! ! " screams the philosopher as he sucks the 
remainder of the substance down his throat. Soon his two 
companions join in on the fun, and our courageous heroes find 
themselves grooving to the beat of the music. 

Eventually, they break off to mingle with the other party- 
goers. Socrates spends the night hitting on a Boston College 
Eagle Dancer, only to find that she is a he; Pocahontas finds 
herself enraptured with the ghost of Billy the Kid; and the T 
driver meets up with the diabolical Riddler to plan a hostile 
takeover of the MBTA. 

When the night is through, the three meet up at the door 

and bid their gracious hosts farewell. "Happy Halloween!" And 

our heroes stumble home to bed. 

Barbara Restaino '97 




84 Halloween 








Halloween 85 



HMMH 



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^ Tradition of 




Boston College's motto is "Ever to Excel," which 
embodies both the spirit and the ideal of the Jesuit tradition. The 
Jesuits encourage their students to excel in all endeavors, both 
academic and altruistic. 

In 1863, the Society of Jesus founded Boston College, 
which soon grew to become one of the foremost academic 
institutions in the area. The Jesuits were revered as "the 
schoolmasters of Europe" and retained that same respect in 
America. They were known for their century old commitment 
to education which can be cited as a reason for the college's 
success. 

The primary goal of the Jesuits was education, and in 
particular, higher education. The original curriculum of the 
Jesuit institutions required the students to study classical 
languages and literature, philosophy, and religion. That basic 
curriculum serves as the archetype for the core curriculum at 
BC. It provides a base of knowledge as well as opening up new 
paths for the students to explore. 

The Jesuits are also credited with fostering a caring 
attitude and world conscience within their students. This in turn 
promotes the Jesuit ideal of humanitarianism that is characteristic 
among the students who graduate from BC. 

Jennifer Raterman '99 




Courtesy of Garv Gilbert 



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86 Jesuit Spirit 







Courtesy of Gary Gilbert 



Courtesy of Gary Gilbert 




Top Left: Celebration of the Jesuit 

tradition continues as the BC 
community assembles on the steps of 
O'Neill Plaza to participate in the 
Mass of the Holy Spirit. 

Far Left: Father Cleary and friends 
gather to celebrate Mass. 

Left: Saint Mary's Hall is the primary 
residence for the Jesuit comr iit\ at 
Boston College. 



Above: BC students stand 
procession passes iby. 



khe 




Brandi E. Stemerman 



" 



Jesui Spirit 87 



This year's Homecoming weekend came a bit earlier 
than previous years. Because the football game was at night, the 
festivities began on Wednesday, September 13, with the 
Homecoming dance at the Copley Westin Hotel. The dance 
proved to be a success as everyone danced until one in the 
morning. The most popular bar was located in the middle of the 
dance floor, causing large crowds. Everyone had so much fun 
dancing that they felt the need to bring their drinks onto the floor 
and when they were finished, dispose of them right then and 
there. Glass bottles shattered on the floor causing delays in the 
dancing. 

Friday night was the ever popular Pops on the Heights at 
Conte Forum. Included in the price of a student ticket was a 
gourmet box dinner and excellent entertainment. Due to 
scheduling conflicts, Marvin Hamlisch stood in as conductor for 
John Williams, the traditional conductor of Pops on the Heights. 
The Pops played a medley of Broadway showtunes, and there 
were several special effects including glow sticks to concur with 
he song "We Are the World." Hundreds of maroon and gold 
balloons fell from the ceiling as the orchestra ended with the BC 
fight song "For Boston." 

Saturday evening, our football team played the Michigan 
Wolverines. After a valiant effort, the Eagles failed to triumph. 





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Kerry Girvin i 




88 Homecoming 




Kerry Girvin 




Kerry Gimn 

Far Top Left: This couple is having 
a fabulous time at the homecoming 
dance at the Copley Weston Hotel. 

Top Left: It's time for a break from 
dancing and a trip to the bar. 

Above: Buenos noches! It was a 

goodnight for all at the Homecoming 
dance. 






Far Left: Pops on the Heights 

violinists make beautiful music 
together. 

I 

Left: Although the dance floor was 

crowded, this trio found the me to 
pose for a picture! 




Kerry Girvin 



Homecoming 89 



Mom <| foad flit the 



The annual arrival of Parents Weekend is anticipated by 
students with either excitement or dread. Either way, it is 
always eventful — whether it was your parents first weekend at 
BC or your last. 

For many freshmen, their parents saw them settled into 
a new home. Their rooms changed from an empty cubicle to, 
well, a cluttered cubicle. Parents may have experienced their 
first BC tailgate, and (if their children allowed them) they may 
have attended a class or two. Always a popular event for 
underclassmen is the Parents Weekend dinner in Conte Forum. 
Families ate dinner while student music and comedy groups 
provided entertainment. Many students and parents went out 
for a night of exploring Boston. Sunday, many students and 
parents attended to the Parents Weekend Mass on the sunny 
O'Neill Plaza. 

Freshmen weren't the only ones that enjoyed Parents 
Weekend. Upperclassmen still look forward to homemade 
cookies and a good Italian feast in the North End. Every year 
students try to introduce their parents to new experiences. Four 
weekends out of four years of experiences can't possibly be 
enough. 

For some students, Parents Weekend was sad because 
their parents weren't able to come. Others may have been 
relieved that they didn't have to straigten up their room in a last 
minute panic. Whatever your relationship with your parents is, 
Parents Weekend is usually memorable. 

Barbara Restaino '97 




Elena K. Vizvaiy i 



90 Parents Weekend 






V 



r 






Left: SMILE! This family looks 
genuinly thrilled tohave their picture 
taken. 

Far Left: This sax player puts soul 
into his solo. BCbOpwasoneofthe 
entertainers at the Parents Weekend 
dinner. 



Elena K. Vizvary 



Elena K. 

Far Left: This student and his parents pose for a picture <S rent's 

Weekend dinner at Conte Forum. 

Left: The bass section of the Bostonians look serious afl |for 

families on Parent's Weekend. 



Above: A happy family reunion at the Parent's Weekend < 












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Elena K. Vizvary 





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Snowballs ffi Crowded Malls 



Christmas comes only once a year. Once students return 
from Thanksgiving break, there is a tremendous increase in 
cheer as the signs of the holiday season sprout up all over 
campus. 

Amidst cramming for exams, students can be seen 
jamming T' s on the weekends to head off for the malls to do that 
last-minute shopping and find that perfect gift. Elsewhere, 
strings of lights, and other holiday decorations, deck adjacent 
mods and apartment suites. Also, holiday festivities pick up, as 
many students attend their respective class sponsored dance. 

As for seasonal activities, one of the highlights of early 
December was the annual tree lighting on O'Neill plaza, where 
students and faculty gathered together to sing carols warmed by 
hot chocolate, friends, and the Yuletide spirit. 

While the first snow of the year melted before the tree 
lighting, no doubt, the arrival of snow to the campus is a much 
anticipated event. From snow ball fights to sledding on meal 
trays, BC students know how to make the best of a snowy 
situation. 

Yet the truest spirit of the season is the spirit of giving, as 
BC students not only remember their friends, but also needy 
families, by donating food, clothes, and toys to help make 
someone else' s Christmas just as special. Whether it is your first 
or last holiday at BC, this time is always among the best. 

Andrea J. Ritola 




Elena K. Vizvaiy 




















































92 Holiday Season 



Far Left: A beafl ■ to 

some, BC's Christmas tree lights up 
O'Neill Plaza. 




Elena K. Vizvary 



Holiday Season 93 






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Above: Henry Rollins brought his 
spoken word tour to Boston College 
in December. Many students listened, 
mesmerized by his power and insight. 

Right: Despite their lateness and 
missing drummer, The Roots pulled 
it together and put on a great show. 
One of the highlights was the bassist' s 
(right) funky jams. 





Special Events 95 



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■■■■I^H 



Continuous ^artu 




Boston College has the reputation of being the Jesuit 
party school. Naive freshmen soon find out that there was 
always a party on the weekends. The conventional BC student 
weekend began Thursday night. This was obvious in the lack of 
attendance to early morning Friday classes. 

For underclassmen, who are not yet 21, covert acts must 
have be taken in order to ensure a good time. Stealth methods 
were used to transport beer and other alcohol into dorm rooms 
without being stopped by RAs. 

There was always a party off campus, and everyone 
always knew Comm. Ave. addresses for the evening' s soirees. It 
was common to see the Comm. Ave. bus packed with party- 
goers in search of a good time. Another popular place to visit was 
the Mods on lower campus. These were more discriminating 
parties though, and you usually needed a personal invite in order 
to be welcome. Sports team parties were always a good time 
even though three-quarters of the people present weren' t members 
of the team. It was always fun to unwind with fellow team-mates 
after a hard week of practice. If anything, team parties are more 
of a bonding experience with kegs. 

Boston bars are the absorbing locations of choice for 
those students with ID. Every Tuesday night the freshmen dorms 
are littered with flyers for "Thirsty Thursday" at Who' s on First. 
Crimson, Our House, Armadillo, and Great Scott's were other 
popular hangout among underclassmen. Among the Seniors, 
Mary Ann' s is a popular bar which is close to campus and offers 
a good time with friends. 

BC is a highly competetive university in academics and 
in sports . Partying was one of the more popular ways of relieving 
the anxieties of high-tension life. 

Jennifer Raterman '99 




Courtesy of Mary BannemiaD' 



96 Partying 




Courtesy of Kristen Messier 




Courtesy of R\an fc 

Far Top Left: Theme parties allow 
students to dress up and act crazy. 



, 



Top Left: Right foot on gree: 



Above: This party must have been a 
good one because everyone is all 
smiles. 

Far Left: Happy Birthday! Birthday 
parties are always fun because all 
your friends celebrate with you. 



I 



Left: These guys know how to have 
a great time when they go out to 
dinner. 



Courtesy of Zeb Mjletskv 



Partying 97 



Constant Cr apings 



Dining at Boston College is an experience some would 
rather avoid, but contrary to many students' opinions, the food 
at BC is not that bad. We are given quite a few options here on 
the Heights. 

Some students satisfyed their palate at McElroy dining 
hall, usually developing a love/hate relationship with the choices 
within the white picket fence. At lunch time, the Eagle's Nest 
was the place to be, but some students prefer fast food style 
service with a smile at the Rat in the basement of Lyons. 
Upperclassmen usually dine in the Lower Campus Dining Facility, 
which is usually shortened to simply "Lower." There was a slight 
confusion for a while when juniors and seniors often called it the 
"new" dining hall or even the "new" dorms. This was probably 
due to the design's resemblence to Vanderslice Hall and 90 St. 
Thomas More Drive. 

Those students who craved a late night snack mysteriously 
found themselves at the Club on Upper Campus or at Addie's on 
Lower Campus. 

No matter how many new methods of consumption there 



was. one tradition will always remain, which is the social aspect y »iiiB js* jgg ^ v 



of mealtime. Students will always look forward to talking about 
the day' s events with their friends at dinner no matter what is on 
the menu. 

Barbara Restaino '97 




98 Dining Services 




Far Left: Freshmen decide what 
beverage to drink with their meal. 

Left: "IwishlwereeatingatLower." 

Far Bottom Left: Waiting on line at 
the Rat is never very fun. 

■ 

Bottom Left: For once, the wait tor 

a sub at Lower wasn't an hour long. 

Below: These students' stomachs 
led them to Addie's for a late night 
slice of pizza. 




Aimy Tse 



Dining Services 99 



Smelly Socks $ Combination Xocks 



The Plex serves as the recreation outlet available to all 
students at Boston College. Located near Alumni Stadium and 
Conte Forum, it is easily accessible to those upperclassmen 
living on Lower Campus. For freshmen, it may have been a trek 
from Upper Campus or Newton, but most agreed that it was 
worth it. 

All you needed to do is show your BC ID and you were 
in. The Plex admits everyone from the experienced varsity 
athlete to the freshmen exploring the exercise complex for the 
first time. 

Anyone could find some form of exercise suited to their 
taste at the Plex whether you were a skillful athlete or just trying 
to lose a few pounds before Spring Break. Some prefered to play 
games such as volleyball, basketball, tennis, or raquetball. Others 
liked to swim a few laps in the pool or hopped on a Stairmaster. 
The Plex also provided a place for many sports teams to practice 
such as the track, wrestling, and diving teams. 

The Plex can be seen as one of the places where it was 
possible to have fun and feel good about it at the same time. 
Some, however, may have disagreed. These were the students 
who stick with the theory that working out at the Plex leads to 
insanity. 

Laura Needham '99 




100 The Plex 




Aimy Tse 




to 



Aim) TV' 

TopLeft: These die-hard Plex-goers 
climb their way to total fitness. 

Above: This BC student sets up for 
a serve on the tennis courts in the 
Plex. 

Bottom Left: Uuhg. Those sit-ups 
can be so killer. 

Left: From inside "the cage." a work- 
study students helps this guy sign up 
for time on the exercise equipment. 



The Plex 101 



Jpear of firsts 



New faces, new buildings, new friends, and a new home. 
When you added up all that college brings, it was easy to see why 
it can be such a difficult experience for first-year students. 
During the first few weeks, some freshmen were not even sure 
it was all worth it. Although there were many who made the 
transfer easily, there were always others who got homesick. 

After a few months, the nameless faces down the hall 
turned into good friends. The campus that used to seem so huge 
now is a real home away from home. Freshmen have learned 
where to get the best food, which T line is the fastest and where 
the best places in the city are. The word "friends" split into 
"college friends" and "friends from home." The word no longer 
referred only to their high school buddies. They no longer 
considered their hometown their only home. Now there is 
"home" and "home home." All of this was brought on by the 
dramatic change of entering college. 

Though this change was good for the most part , it also 
included the realization of what it really meant to be at college. 
There was no longer a parent watching over their shoulders 
making sure they did the right thing. This was a good experience 
because it forced many to grow up in a way they never expected. 
Most freshmen will look back on their first year in college 
fondly. Sometimes difficult times in the beginning lead to 
memorable ones in the end. 

Laura Needham '99 



102 Freshmen 




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mailbox is empty'?" 



--,: 



Michael Drage 



Left: Who will last longer — the 
goldfish or the freshmen? 

Bottom Left: This carpet is going to 
be difficult to get up three flights of 
stairs. 

Below: Billy-Ray the alligator learns 
typing skills crucial to every 
freshman. 




Freshmen 103 






Jpear of the Wise J^ool 



Sophomore year was a year of learning experiences and 
adjustment; a year of finally being able to balance having fun and 
completing work on time (usually). 

For the most part, students were all packed onto lower 
campus, while some unfortunate few lived on College Road. 
Those unlucky folks still had to eat at McElroy and trek down 
hundreds of stairs in order to see the rest of their friends. The 
majority of the class lived in Walsh, Edmonds, or on St. Thomas 
More Dr. There were a few dire changes such as the need to clean 
your own bathrooms and trying to adjust to living with eight 
people. 

This was the year that you actually had to declare a major 
and started to take classes that actually pertained to that major. 
By the middle of first semester, those students who were not 
guaranteed four years of housing had to start hunting for 
apartments for the following September. Yes, this was a year of 
newfound responsibility. 

It was also a year of fun. Goofing off was extremely easy 
when you lived in a building of 800 people. Hall sports, water 
fights, and fire drills all proved great fun in a dorm such as Walsh. 
Just when you thought you couldn't meet any more people 
freshman year, sophomore year came along and there was the 
other half of your class to meet — Upper people meet the 
Newtonites and vise versa. 

Sophomore year — the year of the "wise fool." There was 
much to be learned about life, but it was also a time to have as 
much fun as possible before your time at BC was half over. 

Robyn Winters '97 




Elena K. Vizvaiy 



Above: This sophomore will gladly work for peanuts. 



Top Right: These sophomores are having a ball at the Winter Wonderla 
semi-formal. 

Far Right: The sophomore year winter dance is always a memorable I 
for good friends. 

Right: These sophomores make use of the new experience of having 
common room by throwing a slumber party. 



4 



104 Sophomores 






year of Chaos 



"Hey Beth, what's going on this weekend?" 

"Not much, John. Friday there's a party on Sutherland, 
one on Comm. Ave., and one on Cummings. There's gonna be 
a rager on Algonquin Saturday night, and we can't miss that 
party on Chiswick either." 

This was a typical conversation between two juniors. 
Since mnay juniors lived off campus in rickety houses or small 
apartments, they happily abandoned the bar scene in favor of 
local parties. Now that they had to pay for their own food, 
utilities, and furniture, their wallets cheered this decision. 

Juniors made a gallant effort to make it to every party. 
You open the door to a party, only to be greeted by a gust of hot 
air and a hundred other thirsty students. You wait on the keg line 
for 30 minutes only to find that the keg is kicked. No problem, 
there's still four more kegs waiting in the wings. Now, where' s 
the line for the bathroom? 

Junior year isn't just frolicking from party to party. 
There are pressing problems to deal with when you live off 
campus — the bus, the "T," parking, landlords, roaches, etc. 
Many juniors lived even further than Brighton — like France, 
Great Britain, Italy, Australia, etc. Junior year abroad was 
something almost every junior wished for. Some juniors who 
were granted four years of housing lived on campus and enjoyed 
this convenience, especially when they heard their friends 
complain about their off campus problems. 

This year, the junior class realized that their classes in 
their first two years were easier compared to the loads of 
studying they did this year. And at the end of junior year, they 
realized, "Next year at this time, I'll be graduating then 

what?" 

Barbara Restaino '97 



106 Juniors 




Courtesy or Barbara Restaino 



ft K r * 




Far Left: This junic t vi ait 

to climb the Higgins' stairs to get to 
class. 

Left: These Edmond's residents take 
a study break to lounge around and 
watch T.V. 

Far Bottom Left: Which one of 
these juniors is really excited to have 
her picture taken?(y 

Bottom Left: These roomates pose 
for a final picture before they go to 
Pops on the Heights. 

Below: Junior life wouldn't be 

complete without the ever-present B C 
football game. 




Courtesy of Elizabeth A. Bat 



\t. Keren) 






Juniors 107 



year ofXasts 



Time flies when you're having fun, and in the past four 
years, you've had plenty of it. It seems like only yesterday that 
you moved into your freshman dorm, and now it's almost over. 

This year consisted of trying to cram more than ever 
seemed possible into just a few months. School spirit was high 
as the football season neared the end because, after all, this could 
be your "last football game." The decision to go out instead of 
writing that paper became a lot easier (going out, of course) 
because it could be the last time that you would go to Mary Ann ' s 
in the month of October. There were lots of lasts — last time 
eating at the Eagle's Nest, last time waiting for a computer at 
OCF, last time dealing with RAs, etc. 

There were plenty of firsts as well. You finally discovered 
important places like the Career Center and your advisor's 
office. Words that seemed foreign for so long, like "resume" and 
"job" became part of your everyday vocabulary. You finally got 
a registration time that allowed you to register for classes that 
you actually wanted to take. All of your friends were legal and 
there was no worrying that someone would not get into a bar. 

In the past four years there have been memorable times. 
You've made some the greatest friends you'll ever have. Some 
people are ready to move on; some will do anything they can to 
stay another year. In any case, most likely, you will look back 
favorably on your time at BC. 

Robyn Winters '97 




108 Senior Life 



Courtesy of Rachael Nokes 




Courtesy of Mary Heller 



Courtesy of Liz Gentile 




Top Far Left: These two friends 
share a special moment and a couple 
of pink drinks. 



coupl 



Top Left: Jenee Palmer. Mary Heller. 
Jennifer Lalonita. and Erin Zagrubski 
pose for a picture at this year's Pops 
on the Heights. 

Above: "Sure we'll smile! It's our 
last year." 

Far Left: These two seniors pose in 
their BC Crew attire for a picture on 
the banks of the Charles River. 

Left: Friends don't let f lends 
scorpion bowl alone. 



Senior Life 109 



It 's a Mod, Mod World ~| 



Remember during your tour of Boston College when the 
guide pointed to those ugly brown and orange houses and said, 
"Those buildings are the most popular senior housing." 
Strategically placed on Lower Campus between the dining hall 
and the football stadium, the Mods were meant to be just 
temporary housing for seniors while more permanent housing V 
was being built. The most important and utilized feature is the 
"backyard." Even though there is little of it, Mod residents 
manage to make use of every blade of grass while tanning, 
reading, playing various sports, barbecuing and socializing. 

Just like all housing at BC, some Mods are more desirable 
than others (although almost any senior in Hillsides would 
gladly take any Mod). The shoe tree Mods are centrally located 
and usually the first to go in the lottery. This quad contains a 
large tree in the middle that is home to dozens of pairs of sneakers 
(and even a few lawn chairs). 

Tailgating in the Mods is where the action is on football 
mornings. The residents are the ones who start off their day early 
with a bagel and a beer, eventually waking up the rest of Lower 
Campus in time to join them before the game. Another activity 
exclusive to the Mods is Mod Golf. This semi-annual event is a 
huge "Around the World" party in which each Mod involved has 
a different theme and therefore a different type of beverage. 

Every year there are rumors that the Mods are going to be 
torn down. This rumor has been flying around campus since the 
'70s. Maybe this is part of its charm — everyone wants to live in 
them before they're gone. No matter when and if they ever do 
knock them down for some fancy senior high-rise, the Mods will 
always be a legendary part of BC history. 

Robyn Winters '97 




110 Mods 



w 




Far Left: "Who made this mess!'.'!" 
These Mod residents can't figure out 
what happened to their Mod 
overnight. 

Left: The essence of Mod life - 
getting together with friends for a 
few drinks. 

Bottom Left: These Seniors ham it 
up at an after-dance Mod party. 

Bottom Center: "Pile on!!" These 
seniors are goofingoff forthecameru. 

Below: Pausing to pose for a picture 
at a Mod barbeque 



Courtesy of Amy Solomon 




Courtesy of James Reiuhle 



Courtesy of Sarah Sheilds 



Mods 111 



Working Jiard . . . 



Right: The students studying in the library aren't the only ones who are 
working hard. This work-study employee is busy putting books on the 
shelves. 

Bottom Right: John Duggan, a work-study student at Dunkin' Donuts, 
always serves you your daily dose of caffeine with a smile. 

Below: Those students who are committed to working hard usually do it 
at the library. At O'Neill they may not be at peace, but are assured quiet. 

Far Below: Study rooms are available at O'Neill so students can meet 
with classmates and have a discussion without bothering others. 




P;im Ouaknine 



112 Working Hard 



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Bottom Left: Talking on the phone seems to be the favored method of 
procrastination — especially when it's long distance. 

Left: Most students feel the need to take a break from studying with the 
excuse that you can't let studying get in the way of college. Thes 
roomates found that a good game of cards helps ease the stress. 

Below: Makiko found that her complete breakfast of O.J. and donuts 
didn't help her stay awake for very long. 



Kerry Girvin 




Kerr)' Girvin 



Hardly Working 1 1 3 



■■BM^^^^^^^^HHMB 



Off the Jieights 



It seems like just yesterday we were applying to college. 
Remember how you felt when you read your application to BC 
and found that you had to write not one, but two essays? I do. In 
fact, the other day, when I was cleaning my room (something that 
rarely happens at college), I found a copy of my application. I 
paged through it and decided to read my response to the 
question: "Why do you want to come to Boston College?" In 
addition to numerous reasons I gave for wanting to come to BC 
(the academic reputation being first and foremost, of course), I 
wrote about the life that I wanted to experience outside the Main 
Gate and inside the city of Boston itself. 

Everyone knows Boston is the college capital of the 
world with one in five people being a college student, and we all 
know there are an infinite number of things to do in Boston. Who 
hasn't shopped on Newbury Street? Who hasn't been to Faneuil 
Hall? Who hasn't eaten dinner in the North End? Who hasn't 
watched a street performer in Harvard Square? Who hasn't 
depended on that great, glowing beacon, the Citgo sign, to show 
them the way home after a long night out on the town? And I 
can't think of a better place to spend a sunny Saturday afternoon 
than at the Boston Commons. If you haven't experienced any of 
these things, you're missing out on the opportunities just a T-ride 
away from your doorstep. We are living in a city that offers an 
exciting history and an overflow of cultural opportunities. One 
thing is for certain, I am glad to have spent my college years in 
the hub of one of the greatest cities in the world. 

Crista Pontilena '97 




114 Boston 




Boston 115 



Above: Many interesting statues can be found scattered around Boston. 

Top Right: The Coffee Connection always provides people with a warm 
place to have a cup of coffee and a good conversation. 

Right: You can always find people taking pictures of the buildings around 
Government Center. 

Center: Always a popular photograph, the refection of the Trinity Church 
can be seen in the John Hancock Building. 

Far Right: You can see many sad and interesting buildings on a cold winter 
evening in Boston. 




116 Boston 





Nicole Griffith 



Boston 117 




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Above: How far is this man going to hike to give flowers to his love? 

Right: It's a perfect snow-covered day for skiing at Harvard Square, where 
skiing on the sidewalk is not an anomaly. 

Above Right: George Washington will forever ride in the Boston Commons. 




118 Boston 



^ X * 4. A 




ESS 





Left: This church in Harvard Square- 
represents some of the amazing 
architecture that can be found in 
Boston. 

Bottom Left: A man walks through 
the Holocaust Memorial in downtown 
Boston, remembering those who 
tragically lost theirlives over 50years 



Below: The Black Rose is a popular 
little bistro in Faneuil Hall. 





120 Activities 




Photo Courtesy of Luca Venza 




Jyoti Mahapatra, Editor 



Shakespeare wrote " All the world is a stage... 
And one man in his time plays many parts." 
Students at Boston College had many roles 
through which they expressed their interests, 
talents, and leadership skills. We grew as afamily, 
sharing our thoughts, feelings, and dreams that 
can never be generated in a classroom setting. 
Finding focus in a common goal fostered 
community and sense of accomplishment for 
groups such as 4 Boston and Appalachia 
Volunteers. From UGBC to a cappella groups, 
students' voices soared above the tower of Gasson 
and echoed in the hearts of all who listened. 




Activities 121 



Below: The Investment Club pose for a group picture during a meeting. 

Top Middle: The ROTC Air Force students at Boston University. 

Bottom Middle: Senior Cadet Jonathan Quitasol gets aquainted with a jet during a training camp at the Lackland Air Force Base in San 
Antonio. 




Junior Achievement 






122 Academics 



3BER 




Academics 



Photo Courtesy of Jonathan Quitaso! 



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Many organizations focus on 
the academic development of 
students. They aimed to 
create great networks of 
communication for careers 
after college. 

The Accounting Academy 
offered opportunities for 
accounting majors to meet 
recruiters. Joanne Byrne felt it 
was a way for members to 
"learn more about accounting 
opportunities." 

The Arts and Sciences 
Association helped advise 
students and served as 
a resource for career 
development. It hosted 
numerous programs about 
graduate school and 
internships. 

The Fulton Debating Society 
extended the opportunities for 
those interested in debate by 



competing in many different 
tournaments. 

The Investment Club 
functioned as an educational 
opportunity as members 
learned how to invest money 
for the future. 

Junior Achievement was a 
volunteer organization that 
traveled to elementary schools 
in Boston to sponsor teaching 
programs. Erin Parks said, 
"young children were 
encouraged to stay in school as 
they learned about the business 
world." 

The ROTC programs of the air 
force, army, and navy offered 
military training as well as 
opportunities for dedicated 
students. As reserve officer 
training programs, these groups 
offered extensive field training 
and discipline to members. 

Melissa McGann 




Elena K. Vizveiy 



Arts and Sciences Association 



Academics 123 



Top Left: The Acoustics celebrate after a concert. 

Middle: The Shaips show their care for others by 
performing at the AIDS Vigil at O'Neill Plaza in 
December. 

Bottom Left: The Bostonians show just how "BAD" 
they are. 

Far Right: Greg Brady? No, its Greg Nerpouni 
groovin' at a Heightsmen cafe. 









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124 A Cappella The AcOUStiCS 



The Bostonians 




A Cappella 





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The Acoustics, Bostonians, 
Heightsmen, and Sharps 
comprised the campus a 
cappella singing groups. The 
Acoustics, youngest of the 
groups, made a niche for 
themselves in a short time by 
performing the unusual as well 
as more traditional music. This 
co-ed group did not restrain 
themselves to the norm. From 
rap to Disney, the Acoustics' 
wide plethora of musical genres 
made them a popular group on 
campus. 

The Bostonians also consisted 
of both men and women, and 



had a more contemporary style 
to their entertainment. The 
group also had the opportunity 
to sing at Fanueil Hall in 
November and appear on a 
national morning television 
show. 

The Heightsmen, the all male 
group on campus, performed a 
wide range of music from do- 
wop to classical, all in the main 
pursuit of fun. Their concerts 
often included skits displaying 
their diverse talents, making 
audiences swoon with laughter 
and music. 

(continued on page 126) 




Elena K. Vizvary 




Elena K. Vizvary 



Elena K, Vizvary 



The Heightsmen 



BC Sharps A Cappella 125 



The BC Sharps, made up of all 
females, combined their 
musical talent and sense of 
humor to perform popular hits 
such as Alannis Morissette's 
"Hand in My Pocket" and 
Sophie B Hawkins' "Lay Me 
Down." Like the other a 
cappella groups, the Sharps 
also sponsored a cafe 
night in McElroy and other 
performances throughout the 
year like singing at the Heart 
Rock Cafe and on World 
AIDS Day. 




Elena K, Vizvary 



Upper Right: Singing a song always puts a smile on 
this Heightsman's face. 

Above: This Bostonian adds a instrumental touch to 
their concert. 

Right: Acoustics Alumni lend their vocal support for 
this nunber. 



6 A Cappella 





Elena K. Viz vary 



Elena K. Vizvary 



A Cappella 127 



Right: Head Case rocks down the house in the Cabaret 
Room. 

Below: The RHA shows em how to live at their national 
conference in Virginia Tech. 



Bottom Right: The RHA sponsor a memorable night with 
the help of the Bostonians. 

Far Right: The RHA celebrating while at a regional 
conference at the University of Vermont. 




BC Student Agencies 



Christine Zanchi 



Student Admissions Program 



Campus Life 



fit a 4 



#- 






Student-run activities are an 
exciting and interesting aspect 
of college. They provide a 
variety of services, ranging 
from educational to social. 
Campus Information and 
Activities operate the popular 
Thursday night cafes held in 
McElroy, featuring A Cappella 
and comedy groups from BC. 
The Student Judicial Board 
involves students in the judicial 
process by working with school 
policies as well as interacting 
with other students. 
The Student Admissions 
Program differs from the other 
student organizations in that it 



aims to recruit prospective 
students by assisting the 
admissions office. The words 
Indegrity, Community, 
Service, and Commitment 
comprised the group" s mission 
statement signifying their 
goals. 

SAP is the largest volunteer 
activity on campus and is 
divided into eight different 
programs. AHANA student 
recruitment, campus tours, and 
day visits are a few of the 
services SAP offer to high 
school students interested in 
BC. 

Samantha Steel 




Photo Courtesy of RHA 



RHA Executive Board 



Campus Life 129 




Top: Students gather for a photo at 
an Intravarsity Christian 
Fellowship meeting. Besides 
getting together on campus, the 
group also went on retreats. 

Top right: King Kabaka Ronald 
Mutebi II of Buganda speaks to 
students about the state of the 
African economy. The presentation 
was sponsored by the organization 
Presenting Africa to You. 

Right: The party is just beginning 
for those who attended the 
Organization of Latin American 
Affairs, held in the Cabaret Room 
in Vanderslice Hall. 




Diversity 






i 



Kerry Girvin 



There are over 25 different 
cultures present on campus. In 
order to foster relationships 
between them as well as among 
the members of the groups, 
there are clubs for each culture. 
To create a sense of belonging 
for members of a culture, 
diversity organizations 
sponsored a number of events. 
Everyone loves to eat, so a 
common occasion to get 
together was to enjoy ethnic 
foods that are often lacking in a 
college student's diet. 
Dances displaying a culture's 
customs were also held by 
various groups such as the 
Hellenic Society, the Indian 
and the Cape Verdean 
Students' Association. Other 
students were encouraged to 
join in on the fun, as most club 



meetings and programs were 
open to the entire campus. 
Another method cultural 
groups used to bridge any gaps 
between clubs and the general 
student population was to hold 
forums. The Black Student 
Forum scheduled speakers and 
spoke themselves on what 
encounters they had 
experienced during their lives 
from their culture's point of 
view. 

By allowing others to 
experience the richness of 
culture and learning from one 
another, diversity clubs offered 
education to students on 
campus that were often not 
available in the classroom. 



Jyoti Mahapatra 




International Club Officers 



Diversity 131 



Top Middle: An Indian Association meeting. 
Bottom Middle: Chinese Students Association 




CSA 



3 2 Cultural Diversity 





4» 






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y- 



u 





CVSA 




Mike Drage 



Top: Cape Verdean Student Association. 







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Indian Association 



Brandi E. Slemermati 



Cultural Diversity 133 



Bottom: Members of the Korean Club enjoy some ethnic home cooking. 

Top Middle: AHANA Council. 

Bottom Middle: Southeastern Student's Association. 




134 Cultural Diversity 













Left: Two students participate in the Korean club 
activities. 



Mike Drage 



Mike Drage 



Cultural Diversity 135 



Below: Hard work and dedication helped make ballet numbers look easy. 

Middle: Members of Dance Ensemble used their bodies to form creative 
poses and images for the audience. 

Top Right: Practice and dedication paid off for these dancers, obvious by 
their balance and grace. 

Bottom Right: Billowing costumes and props such as scarves helped to make 
the Dance Ensemble a form of art. 




1 36 Dance Ensemble 



Dance Ensemble 




Dance Ensemble 



In its fifteenth anniversary year, 
the Dance Ensemble is once 
again stepping in the right 
direction. Led by Senior 
Director Nicole Vigna and 
Assistant Director Meredith 
McGrady, the ensemble was 
operated, directed, and 
choreographed by its members. 
The forty devoted dancers took 
time out of their schedules to 
attend bi-weekly classes in 



ballet, jazz, tap, or lyrical 
dancing. Each semester the 
dancers had an opportunity to 
show off their hard work and 
talent at performances held in 
Robsham Theater. For many 
years past and present, the 
Dance Ensemble has been 
considered a success by its 
members and audiences alike. 



Jessica Egidio 



Elena K. Vizvary 




Elena K. Vizvary 



Elena K. Vizvary 




Elena K. Vizvurv 



Dance Ensemble 137 



Right: Film Board outside their office in McElroy. 

Far Right: The Committee for Creative Enactments decide to show off for their 
group photo. 




Branch E. Stemerman 



38 Entertainment 



CCE 



Many groups on campus 
promote entertainment and 
individual expression. They 
encompass many forms of 
drama, humor, and dance. 
The Committee for Creative 
Enactments, or the CCE, 
created improvisational, 
audience interactive murder 
mystery shows. These were 
completely written, directed, 
and produced by the club 
members. 

The Film Board opened the 
world of movies to the BC 
community. With free movies 
almost every weekend, recent 
films were made readily 
available to all. 
The Liturgical Arts Group 
offered students an opportunity 
to get involved as a music 
ministry group. It fostered 
community spirit with singing 




Entertainment 



at masses. 

Murray House hosted many 
events this year such as 
spaghetti dinnersevery Sunday 
not only to give transfer 
students a place to meet one 
another, but also served as a 
quiet place to study. 
The People's Performing Arts 
Company promoted cultural 
diversity through theater. 
Crystal Midnight stated, "It was 
geared to entertain, motivate, 
organize, and unite students 
through intercultural 

awareness." 

The radio station, WZBC, 
provided the opportunity for 
students to participate in a 
community radio station that 
served the Metro-Boston area 
while playing a wide variety of 
music that could not be heard 
anywhere else. 

Melissa McGann 



Elena K. Vizvary 



People's Performing Art's Company 



Golden Eagle Dance Team 



Elena K. Vizvary 



Entertainment 139 



Below, Right, Bottom Far Right: Various a cappella groups from east 
coast colleges competed in the annual Spring Songfest in Robsham 
Theater. The event, which was put on by the Musical Guild, also featured 
on campus groups such as the Heightsmen and the BC Sharps. 

Top Far Right: WZBC deejays and staff get together at the radio station 
for a club photo. The group even included Tex, the beagle which could 
often be found wandering around the station. 





Kerry Girvin 






140 Entertainment 




Entertainment 141 



Below: At a weekly T.R.E.E. meeting members decide on ways to promote recycling on campus, such as Earth Day 
activities and an awareness week. They promoted recycling in dorms and dining halls by distributing free mugs to 
freshmen. 

Middle: A student enjoys the sunny fall weather during the Rainforest Awareness Coalition's fundraiser on the 
dustbowl. 

Far Right: Pertinent issues are addressed by an enthusiastic R.A.C. member during a group meeting in Cushing. 






1 




1 i 


ni 4 




142 Environmental Amnesty Illt'l. 



Elena K. Vizviiry 



Environmental Action Coalition 



Environmental 




Together the Environmental 
Action Coalition, The 
Recycling Effort for the 
Environment, and the 
Rainforest Awareness 

Coalition offered ways for 
students to get involved with 
the environment. 
EAC addressed more global 
and political issues by 
protesting mistreatment of 



endangered forestland or 
companies that exploited 
natural resources. 
Amnesty International focused 
on imprisonment in America 
and worldwide where people 
were held captive based on sex, 
religion, or race. They wrote 
against policies such as 
violence and the death penalty. 
Jyoti Mahapatra 




Mary Au 



Michael Wong 




Michael Wong 



Rainforest Awareness Coalition 



T.R.E.E. 



Christine Zanchi 

Environmental 143 



Right: The Amish are coming! The Amish are coming! 

Middle: Although it looks painful, being a member of Shovelhead 
is actually an enjoyable experience. 

Far Right: Whether she's stretching or disco dancing, this 
Shovelhead member sure did entertain. 

Bottom Left: A Shovelhead performance in Fulton Hall. Each 
show was usually repeated twice in one night. 

Bottom Right: "If only I were a blond like this guy. ...after all, 
they do have more fun, right? 
















Michael Drage 




144 Hello. ..Shovelhead! 



Hello . . . Shovelhead ! 



Hello . . . Sho velhead ! 




What do Fulton Hall and 
O'Connell House have in 
common? They were both 
places that you could hear some 
of the loudest laughter on 
campus and both are places 
where the improvisational 
comedy troupe, "Hello... 
Shovelhead!" performed this 
year. Under the direction of 
senior Jason Felipe, the group 
is entirely student run and all of 
this group's material was 
written by the members. 
"Hello.. .Shovelhead!", which 
consisted of nine members in 
the fall semester and eight in 



thespring.didtwo major shows 
a semester. The first, a one 
hour show in O'Connell House, 
was shared by another talented 
group on campus - the other 
improvisational comedy 
troupe. My Mother's Fleabag, 
and brought down the house. 
The second show was all 
Shovelhead. The two hour 
extravaganza took place at the 
end of each semester in Fulton 
Hall. This past December, 
the members performed 
"Unplugged. .. But Turned On !" 
for four hilarious shows. 

Lisa Lovas 




Michael Drage 




Hello...Shovelhead! 145 




Above: Members of Stylus take 
a soda break while deep in thought. 

Right: Two members of the 
Society of Professional Journalists 
plan club activities. 



\ 



Top Left: Lexi Haruf and John Nash work on an issue of the Heights. 

Middle: Editor-in-Chief Mike Hoffman makes an important phone call 
concerning the Heights. 

Far Right: Amy Gunderson, Chris Miller, and Laura Tholen sort through 
a basketful of pictures to be printed in BC's primary newspaper. 




16 Journ. 



The Heights 



Journalism 



It is evident, both to the 
participant and the reader, that 
the selection of journalism 
clubs at BC is diverse. Readers 
"never really know what 
they're going to get" with The 
Heights' "objective viewpoints 
and continuous flow of 
information," says Mike 
Hoffman, editor of BC's 
weekly newspaper. Matt 
Monig believed that the bi- 
weekly Observer was also a 
literary staple with its 



"traditional religious and 
political views." Students also 
had two chronicles to choose 
from, Sub Turn and the Video 
Yearbook. For the creative and 
expressive student, there was 
Stylus, which accepted 
submissions for publication, as 
well as the Society of 
Professional Journalists which 
helped students with 
networking and career 
opportunities. 

Rima Nasrallah 




Elena K.. Vizvary 



The Society of Professional Journalists 



Stylus 



Journalism 147 



Right: The Marketing Academy in Fulton Hall. 

Below: Jenn O'Neill, Lara Pasquantonio, Chris- 
tian Bolanos, and Cindy Tahlmore at the Math 
Society Banquet held in Murray House. 

Middle: The Accounting Academy. 




Photo Courtesy of Christian Eolait 



Majors 




Bringing together students with 
common interests is one way 
to achieve the goal of academic 
excellence. Many departments 
such as math, science, and 
psychology have found ways 
to foster the educational process 
in a social setting. 
The Mendel Society allowed 
students majoring in sciences 
or were interested in medicine 
as a career to work with one 
another in a joint effort. A major 
project sponsored by the group 
was the Bioethics Conference. 
The event brought to BC 
speakers and issues relevant to 
society and medicine. 
The Math Society provided 
math majors with experienced 
professionals to help them 
narrow down a broad range of 
career possibilities. The club 



also gathered information on 
tenure candidates and prepared 
professor critiques, forming a 
direct relationship with the 
math department. 
The psychology club gave 
students a chance to find out 
what opportunites were 
available to them on campus 
and beyond. Officers organized 
a faculty night where various 
professors discussed the type 
of research they conducted and 
how psychology majors could 
become involved with the 
studies. Socials with graduate 
students and transfers also 
brought together students who 
had similar academic interests. 

Samantha Steel and 
Jyoti Mahapatra 



Michael Wong 




English Association 



Majors 149 



Bottom: This Psychology Club member listens intently while activities like 
Peer Advisement Night and a holiday social are planned. 

Right: President of Psychology Club, Nancy Chevalier happily agrees with 
student suggestions at one of the weekly Wednesday meetings. 



Top Right: Rock On! The Geology Club is sponsored by the Geophysics 
and Geology department. The rest of the student body recognized them as 
the lucky organization to have their very own red vans purchased specifically 
for them. 





Psychology Club 



Majors 151 



Below: "Golden Girl" Roxanne Valentino says farewell to her days on the 
Alumni Stadium field at the last home game of the season. 

Bottom: The Screaming Eagles marching band and Golden Eagle dancers 
provide halftime entertainment during the football game against Miami. 

Right: A member of BC Bop! gives it his all at a performance on Parent's 
Weekend. 





Musical Groups 



Boston College was home to 
some of the most talented 
musical organizations in both 
the country and the world. 
These musical groups were 
extremely diverse, ranging 
from classical and jazz, to 
traditional and popular. 
Instrumental groups such as the 
Screaming Eagles Marching 
Band and the Pep band could 
be spotted entertaining at home 
and visitor football games 
throughout the country. The 
marching band traveled to New 
York to participate in the 
Macy's Thanksgiving Day 
Parade. 

The jazz instrumental groups 
BC bOp! and the Swingin' 
Eagles performed in cafe and 
theatre shows, as well as other 
special gatherings. 
Classical music could be heard 



Elena K. Vizvery 



from the concert band and 
Orchestra in McElroy 
Commons, Gasson Hall, and 
Robsham Theatre. 
The University Chorale, an 
orchestral-based choir, 
performed contemporary and 
classical pieces while traveling 
all over the world, including 
this year's trip to the Bahamas 
during spring break. 
The Voices of Imani 
concentrated upon religious 
and concert music, and could 
be seen in performances 
throughout the Boston area and 
beyond. Smaller groups like 
the Flute choir and the Irish 
traditional tunes, kept music 
alive on campus. The Madrigal 
singers added an a cappella 
touch to Christian music and 
were featured in the Campus 
Messiah Sing. 

Lisa Lovas 




Left: The brass players take a 
break from marching in. 



Musical 153 






Right: Voices of Imani members 
pause while their director speaks 
about the musical group. 

Below: Chorale makes their fall 
debut at St. Mary ' s Chapel on Newton 
Campus. The group focuses on 
classical and holiday music. 




Michael Drage 



[ l 3 l !£ > 3 l 2 l 5 , 5- l 5 l S l S l & 

iTi^i = !~i"in!iRiRiina 

■ mb wm mm «§«■•«■ *m *m mm 










Elena K. Vizvary 




Musical 



Chorale 



Elena K. Vizvl 



Left: Singers at a Voices of Imani 
concert light candles in honor of the 
holiday season. 




Michael Drase 



Michael Draee 




Voices of Imani 



Michael Drage 



Musical 155 



Right: Don Schuerman introduces 
the next improv to the audience at 
the Cafe. 

Below: Me Tarzan, you Jane! 

Bottom: BC football at its best! 




My Mother's Fleabag 



My Mother's Fleabag 




My Mother's 
Fleabag 



According to the British, a 
fleabag is a "cheap cockroach 
infested motel." So then why 
does one of the oldest and one 
of the most popular college 
comedy troupes in Boston call 
themselves My Mother's 
Fleabag? Well, according to 
Fleabag member, Alfredo De 
Quesada, " We're so cheap that 
we can't even go to a fleabag, 
we have to go to 'My Mother' s 
Fleabag.'" Their troop has been 
successful, having survived 
for the past fiteen years on what 
the audience has given them to 
work with. 



Founded in 1 980, My Mother' s 
Fleabag has acquired a 
following that far exceeds the 
members of this campus. Their 
year was packed, performing at 
both the cafe and O'Connell 
House, not to mention 
contributing their unique style 
to the AIDS benefit in the 
spring. The improv team was 
also on the go, performing at 
the University of Connecticut, 
as well as being one of the 
headliners of the first annual 
Bean Prov, held here in Boston. 

Mary Au 



Mary Au 





Above Center: Let's Dance! 

Above: So ya wanna fight? 

Left: Michelle Guardino is all "sized up." 



My Mother's Fleabag 157 



Bottom: In between dances sophomore Elena Vizvary and freshman 
Dan Shomaker decide there's always time for a photo during the 
Breaking the Barriers' Ball. 



Middle: Students enjoying the company of Father Monan at the 
Breaking the Barriers Ball, held in December. 

Top Right: A happy couple dances the night away. 

Bottom Right: Dan Rockett shows off his musical versatility while 
playing at O'Connell House. 




58 O'Connell House 



O'Connell House 



O'Connell House 




Michael Drase 



Located in the heart of Upper 
Campus, O'Connell House 
serves a variety of purposes for 
students. It was a place for 
them to escape their hectic lives 
and study in a relaxing 
atmosphere or watch their 
favorite shows on the big screen 
television. 

Besides being a "home" on a 
daily basis, O'Connell House 
offered alternatives to the usual 
campus activities. Every 
Sunday evening was movie 
night, which included hits such 
as "While You Were Sleeping" 
and old time favorites like 



hael Drage 



"Breakfast at Tiffany's". 
Guests also provided 
entertainment at O'Connell 
House, with the appearance of 
guitarist Dan Rockett and 
speaker Henry Rollins. 
The two largest activities were 
the Breaking the Barriers Ball, 
which allowed students and 
faculty to mingle outside of the 
classroom, and Middlemarch. 
A theme related dance, 
O'Connell House is 
transformed annually into a 
costume-crazed event for the 
lucky few who received tickets. 
Samantha Steel 




O'Connell House 159 




Above: The College Republican 
President discusses future club 
activities. 

Top Right: Members of the BC 
Democrats listen attentively to each 
other about pertinent political issues . 




BC Democrats 



Politics 




Politics 



College Republicans 



Michael Wong 



Can't decide between Clinton 
and Gingrich? Interested in 
current events or government 
policies? Campus political 
clubs paved an accessible and 
informative path to satisfying 
student's needs. 
College Republicans, led by 
Chairman Joe Lee, were once 
again the largest college 
Republican organization in the 
country. They took several 
trips to New Hampshire in 
anticipation of presidential 
primaries, helped out with 
campaigns, attended rallies, 
and hosted many distinguished 
guest speakers. 

The BC Democrats had over 
150 members including 
President Beth Gilliand. Their 
main focus involved 
volunteering for the Clinton/ 
Gore campaign and other 



congressional races in 

Massachusetts. 

Under Senior President 

Landen Williams, the CSOM 

government operated a 

mentoring program for CSOM 

students, set up a home page on 

the Internet, and compiled 

evaluations used in tenure 

reports. 

The SOE senate, with six 

senators and four officers from 

each class served as a liason 

between the students and the 

faculty. 

Model UN attended various 

conferences at different 

schools. With delegates from 

other colleges, they simulated 

the efforts of the United Nations 

by setting up committees to 

represent countries and creating 

resolutions to the problems 

discussed. 

Jessica Egidio 




UNIV 



Brandi E. Siemerman 

Politics 161 



Left and Bottom: The band House 
Jacks performs in the Lyons basement 
during one of many group shows 
included in the UGBC Pub Series. 
The events gave students a way to 
enjoy music and dancing while 
remaining on campus. 




162 UGBC 



UGBC Cabinet 




UGBC 



The undergraduate government 
is the main representative body 
of the students. "UGBC 
managed the student activity 
fees by dividing it up between 
various clubs, and using what 
was left over for concerts and 
lectures", stated Johanna 
Fuentes, Culture and Social 
Issues Director of UGBC. 
The organization was divided 
into five departments that 
included AIDS Awareness, 
Women's, Environmental, and 
Gay and Lesbian Issues. 
The Finance division allocated 
funds to campus clubs, while 
the Programming committee 
brought guests such as 
comedian Adam Sandler and 
the music group Letters to Cleo. 
Communications committee 
members were responsible for 
publicizing the events 
sponsored by UGBC. This 
department also operated a BC 



television station. 
Seven students from each class 
comprised the UGBC Senate, 
along with appointees from 
the four colleges of study. 
The cabinet participated in two 
training sessions during the 
summer to help prepare 
members for their respective 
duties as a UGBC officer. 
To introduce freshmen to the 
school's government, UGBC 
offered a Mentoring Leadership 
program. 
Freshman followed a cabinet 
member and learned what it 
meant to be on the staff of 
UGBC. Out of an application 
pool of over 300 incoming 
freshmen, approximately 30 
students were chosen. 
There was also an election 
committee that served to 
oversee elections for senate and 
cabinet members. 

Jyoti Mahapatra 



Left: President Bill Lyons and Vice-President Mia Quinn at a weekly 
Cabinet meeting, held every Sunday. 




UGBC Senate 



Elena K. Vizvary 



UGBC 163 



Right: Students gathered in 
front of O'Neill Plaza for an 
AIDS vigil, remembering those 
who suffered because of the 
disease. The event was 
sponsered by the AIDS 
Awareness committee. 

Far Right: The band Top Cat 
performs at the "Heart Rock 
Cafe" held in Lyons' basement. 
This was just one ofthe many 
activities planned during 
Alcohol Awareness week by 
H.E.A.R.T. 

Bottom Right: Members of 
HEART at a weekly Sunday 
meeting. Their acronym stands 
for "Help Educate Alcohol 
Responsibility Together". 




164 Social Awareness 




Social Awareness 



In order to introduce and 
maintain awareness in students, 
there were numerous social 
organizations concentrating on 
important issues of today. 
The Peer Education Network 
was divided into four categories 
to increase campus awareness 
of pertinent issues such as 
alcohol abuse, sexual 
harrassement, and 

discrimination. A peer hotline, 
publicity of available 
rescources, and awareness 
weeks were a part of the 
network's actions to draw 
student attention. 
Other clubs extended their 
horizons to the community, 
hoping to learn through 
volunteering. Project 



Empowerment allowed 
students to "use theirclass skills 
in field work of their interest", 
said Mike Abbate. 
Project 2000, on the other hand, 
devoted weekend time to 
educate inner city youth and 
allowed them to experience the 
diverse lives of others. 
LGBC aimed to increase 
tolerance and understanding 
among the student population. 
Weekly meetings, as well as 
gatherings for holidays was a 
common characteristic of the 
club. Members also found 
comfort in meeting people who 
had faced similar obstacles 
dealing with personal issues of 
sexual preferences. 

Jyoti Mahapatra 



Elena K. Vizvary 




H.E.A.R.T. 



Elemi K. Vizvary 



Social Awareness 165 



Above: LGBC Officers. 



Right: A guitarist from Top Cat performs during 
Alcohol Awareness Week. Some members of 
the band were students at BC. 




166 Social Awareness 



Left: The lead singer of Top Cat pauses for a moment 
in between songs. 



Below: Dusk lulls, surrounding the light emitted from 
candles lit in honor of those who have died of AIDS. 







Social Awareness 167 



Right: Characters in "Dial 'M' For Murder" share a happy moment. 

Middle Left: Contemporary Theater together in Robsham. The club was 
responsible for bringing successful plays to campus. 

Center: Two actors in "Dial 'M' For Murder" engage in serious discussion. 
The show was put on by the Dramatics Society. 

Far Right: Always ready to create a dramatic effect, the Dramatics Society 
couldn't resist dressing up for a group shot. 

Bottom: The musical, directed by Wendy Gordon, presented a light-hearted 
and uplifting look at the gospel. 




Elena K. Vizvary 



168 Theater 




Theater 



Photo Courtesy of Mary Stroiney 




"Actors to places", the voice 
boomed over the intercom. 
From designing to directing 
and acting, the curtain went up 
on another exciting season of 
performances at the Robsham 
Theater Arts Center. 
University Theater gave 
students an opportunity to 
work with faculty in the theater 
department and learn about 
acting on a person to person 
level. This year's Mainstage 
productions included The 
Glass Menagerie, Tartuffe, and 
The Pirates of Penzance. 
The Bonn Studio productions 
included The Effect of Gamma 
Rays on Man in the Moon 
Marigolds, No Exit, and 
Endgame. 

Dramatics Society, the oldest 
organization on campus, was led 
by President Mary Stroiney. 



She oversaw shows 'M' For 
Murder and Marius. 
The Dramatics Society also 
organized the much anticipated 
annual banquet during which 
the theater department honored 
dedicated and talented students. 
Contemporary Theater, led by 
Jessica Binder, was a tight-knit 
student operated group. They 
produced current plays like 
Alice In Wonderland, The Dark 
Hour, and Godspell. 
As the lights dimmed on yet 
another successful season at 
Robsham, both students and 
faculty alike looked back 
fondly at the experience and 
memories they had all 
shared with their theater 
family. 

Brandi E.Stemerman 




Photo Courtesy of Mary Stroiney 



Theater 169 



Bottom: Sarah Streiff, Jason Felipe, and Brad Donohue in The Glass Menagerie 
sa\ grace at dinner. The production was put on by University Theater and 
directed hv Dr. Stuart Hecht. 



Right: In The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds, Kelly 
Heaney played Tillie. an unusual young girl facing obstacles to find her place 
in life. 

Top Far Right: Sophomore Chris Ianacone directs the attention of his fellow 
actors and actresses in the final scene of Tartuffe. 

Bottom Right: It's not Halloween, just the cast of Alice in Wonderland: The 
Dark Hour, after one of their shows. 








«a 




170 Theater 




Photo Courtesy of Tom Kobbs 



Mike Drage 



Theater 171 




Above: A Jamaica Experience volunteer is 
surrounded by many of the children he helped 
durning his stay on the island. 

Right: Future Appalachia members discuss issues 
of their spring break trip at a group meeting, held 
every Sunday in Conte Forum. 

Middle: Seniors Amy LeVally and Erin Mitchell 
make way for new ground during their trip to the 
Appalachias. 



Volunteer 



Appalachia 



Mike Drage 



Christine Zanchi 



Circle K 



Volunteer 




^ 






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Community service gave 
students the chance to influence 
people around them by 
donating time and their care. 
The Initiative for Inner City 
Education and the Heights 
Boys and Girls Club focused 
on children by either helping 
with homework or simply being 
a friend and role model. 
Volunteers hoped to bring a 
bright spot to underprivileged 
children's lives that they could 
count on and remember. 
Festival of Friendship 
organized a carnival for 
mentally and physically 
handicapped children, where 
various other campus groups 
sponsored activities to be held 



at the fair. Best Buddies, on the 
other hand, provided 
companionship to adults that 
were slightly mentally 
handicapped. Students were 
matched with an adult based 
on personalities. They had 
weekly phone calls or letters 
accompanied by a minimum of 
two outings a month. 
Ignacio formed groups that 
traveled to other countries to 
assist a community. Trips to 
Jamaica, Mexico, Belize, and 
the Dominican Republic 
consisted of a small group of 
students who had been accepted 
into the highly competitive 
program. 

Jyoti Mahapatra 




Photo Courtesj of Andrea Leblond 




4 Boston Council 



Mike Drage 




Christine Zanchi 



Nat'l. Student Nurses Assoc. 



Bottom: The Belize Summer Camp troupe enjoys the island landscape. The group spent part of their summer in 
Belize on a volunteer assignment. 

Middle: An Appalachia volunteer gladly performs the duties of construction. Each spring break groups of 
approximately 20 students travel to the southeastern part of the country to help the impoverished inhabitants of the 
area. 

Top Right: A student in Belize enjoys the company of some newfound friends. 

Far Right: Members of the Jamaica Experience volunteer corps smile amidst the New England fall foliage. 





-^^Wlflk 



Photo Courtesy of Pulse Counci 



1 74 Volunteer 



PULSE Council 




Photo Courtesy of Andrea Leblond 



Photo Courtesy of Luca Venza 




Salt & Light 



Volunteer 175 




176 Sports 





Bev Mather and Mistie Psaledas, Co-Editors 



Athletics as education. From the beginning, 
of time, athletes have aspired to be the best 
of the best, learning to endure pain, pressure, 
criticism, and glory which surrounds the sports 
arena. BC athletes are no exception, with high 
standards set for their academic abilities. They 
learned the valuable lessons of balancing humble 
victories on the basketball court with the dignified 
defeats on the football field. The spirit and the 
attitude which the students displayed represents 
BC's excellence on and off the field. 



Shawn T. Mead 




Sports 177 













flfcttM| 








".. 




I 




End Over End 



Although Coach Henning declared the '95 
season as a "disappointment," the Eagles, according 
to quarterback Matt Hasselbeck, "have kept 
expectations high, and we are still ready to meet any 
challenge." Regardless of the disappointments, they 
still show the sparks of a first class football team. 

Led by senior co-captains, offensive tackle 
and All-American Pete Kendall, and the cornerstone 
of the Eagle's offensive line Tim Morabito, the 
team began the season with a tough loss in the 
Kickoff Classic to Ohio State on August 27. The 
1 995 football season immediately bounced back 
with a 20-14 win over Virginia Tech. Injuries 
plagued the team as they faced two more 
consecutive losses to Michigan and Michigan State. 

"We've got to get back to the drawing 
board," Henning stated, and the team responded as 
they pounced on Pittsburgh with a win of 17-0. 
Quarterback Mark Hartsell made an excellent 
showing and the defense shined with three sacks. 

The next two games proved to be difficult 
losses once again, but perhaps the greatest 
disappointment of the season was the 20-10 loss to 
Notre Dame in South Bend. According to offensive 
line backer Markell Blount, "We hung in the game 
the whole time, and had a chance to beat them..." 
Hasselbeck agreed. "No one really gave us a chance 
to beat ND - we were more physical and we 
dominated offensively. We were in a position to 
win but we couldn't pull through." 

The '95 season has, according to Henning, 
"been an overall disappointment. But, the team has 
played hard and worked hard... we need to run the 
ball more successfully, and become more of a threat 
with the ball in the air." 

There have been at least thirteen players 
injured, and many of the freshmen players had to 
step up and "solidify things," stated Henning. Key 
players such as running back Justice Smith, and 
wide receiver and special teams standout Kenyatta 
Watson missed a large part of the season, both due 
to injuries. 

Overall, the season was one of high 
expectations and many disappointments. However, 
Coach Henning is still looking forward to a very 
positive future, and he added, "I just wish that the 
future was now..." 



"[We] have kept expectations high, and we are 
mil ready to meet any challenge. " 

- Matt Hasselbeck 



180 Football 





Below: Coach Dan Henning 
anticipates an Eagle victory over Pitt. 

Left: Quarterback Mark Hartsell 
searches for an open receiver. 







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Opposite Page - 

Top: Mark Hartsell calls out the play to his linemen. 

Middle: Free safety Billy Gustin tackles an Ohio State offensive lineman. 

Bottom: The defensive line rests during a time out. 

This Page - 

Above: Running back Mike Cloud runs for a touchdown. 

Left: The Eagles celebrate their victory over Pittsburgh. 



Football 181 



Fighting 



The Irish 



Amidst a season of disappointment, BC 
faithfully pledged its continued support, as over a 
thousand dedicated fans made the long trek to South 
Bend to wage our annual war with our storied rival 
Notre Dame. The Eagles entered the contest at perhaps 
the lowest point of the season. Following a loss to 
West Virginia and an embarrassing 49-7 home defeat 
at the hand of Army, hopes were not high for BC. 
Entering the contest as heavy underdogs, few could 
expect a close game, but the contest would prove more 
interesting than expected. 

ND received the opening kickoff and proceeded 
to drive the ball 70 yards in five plays, resulting in a 17 
yard touchdown pass to Marc Edwards. The Eagles 
then responded with perhaps their most impressive 
drive of the season. Sparked by solid passing from 
quarterback Mark Hartsell, and highlighted by a reverse 
play to Kenyatta Watson, BC knotted the score at 
seven as Omari Walker dove in from the two yard line. 

The Eagles trailed the Irish 1 0-7 at the half, but 
fell behind 17-7 early in the third quarter. Dan 
Mcguire's 41 yard field goal made it 17-10. Cheering 
BC fans grew vigilant as the team mounted an 
impressive drive and took the ball to the ND 15. With 
BC faithfully cheering on the Eagles in hopes of a third 
straight win, Hartsell dropped back, hesitated, then 
fired the pass towards Dennis Harding, who was 
positioned inside the Irish 5 yard line. BC hopes were 
dashed as the pass was picked off by Tyrone Cobbins, 
and the Irish responded with an eighteen play, 83 yard 
drive yielding a 26 yard field goal. The Eagles mounted 
a final drive, but as Hartsell' s final pass floated out of 
the end zone, the clock expired and victory belonged 
to ND. 

Although the Eagles could not earn a victory, 
the effort showed the team' s heart. Coach Dan Henning 
put things into perspective, "We didn't win, but our 
football players played hard and wanted it... it's no 
secret that our players and our school consider this a 
big football game, and they played accordingly..." 

While the season as a whole has been seen as 
somewhat of a disappointment, the very nature of the 
game revealed the team's character, the fans' 
dedication,our ability to rise to the occasion, and a 
determination to return to excellence. 

- Wes Holmes 



"It/s no secret that our players and our school 
consider this a big football game... " 

- Coach Dan Henning 




Becc 

Top - The faithful fans show ND what it means to take cheering for the t 

seriously. 

Bottom - True tailgaters never let something as insignificant as bad we; 

or several state lines spoil their fun. 



182 Football 




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Top - Unfortunately, these goal posts 
did not give the same view in '95 as 
they did in '93. Of course, there's 
always '97, back at Notre Dame 
Stadium. 

Middle - A rivalry of this caliber 
demands no less than a relocation of 
Shea Field to South Bend. 

Bottom - Notre Dame may have had 
more fans in attendance, but it was 
hard to tell based on the sound of the 
BC crowd. 



Football 183 



Ending On A Positive Note 



After working all season to get back on track, 
the team showed signs of life during a few of their last 
games. BC remained competitive for the entire Miami 
game, nearly pulling off a big upset. For their last 
home game, against a team that was fighting for the 
Big East Title and was nationally ranked by the end of 
the season, the Eagles showed a great deal of heart in 
their incredible fourth quarter comeback. After scoring 
twice, the offense drove down the field one last time in 
hopes of taking the lead. On the fourth down, Coach 
Henning made a hard call against going for it, and they 
attempted a game-tying field goal. It missed, and they 
fell just short of the victory, but more importantly, 
they surprised the Hurricanes with a much better fight 
than had been expected. 

In the final game of the season against Rutgers, 
the Eagles were able to push for that extra yard, and 
cameback from ten points behind with about four 
minutes left. The drive was successful, and set up a 
game winning situation. With less than a minute and 
a half left, Mark Hartsell completed to Todd Pollack 
for his fourth touchdown pass. Hartsell' s performance 
was reminiscent of his solid season last year, and 
earned him the Player of the Game award. Rutgers' 
attempt at a final touchdown, with eight seconds left, 
was foiled by senior Rob Clifford' s interception of the 
ball in the end zone. 

BC had a tough season, full of injuries to key 
players which required many freshman to make the 
step up to college ball much quicker than anyone 
expected. However, next year all those freshman will 
be sophmores with valuable experience. This season' s 
end showed the Eagles have the talent and the heart to 
be a contender in the Big East; next year they will 
prove it. -Jennifer Jagodnik and Cathleen O ' Malley 









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184 Football 









Opposite Page - 

Top: Sophomore wide receiver 
Steve Everson prepares for the 
snap. 

Middle: The defense is lined 
up to hold Michigan back. 

Bottom Left: The Eagles take 
the field fortheirHomecoming 
game, to the roar of the crowd. 

Bottom Right: Running back 
Omari Walker finds a hole and 
makes the play. 



This Page - 

Left: The team celebrates after 
a touchdown. 

Below: Great blocking allows 
sophomore quarterback Matt 
Hasselback time to find his 
receiver. 



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Score 


board 


Overall Record 4-8-0 






Opponent Score 


Opponent 


Score 




Kickoff Classic 


West Virginia 


L 19-31 




vs. Ohio St. L 6-38 


Army 


L 49-7 




Virginia Tech W 20-14 


Notre Dame 


L 20-10 




U Michigan L 13-23 


Temple 


W 10-9 




Michigan St. L 21-25 


Miami 


L 14-17 




Pittsburgh W 17-0 


Syracuse 


L 29-58 






Rutgers 


W 41-38 



Football 185 



Exceeding All Expectations 

With seven new freshmen, and the loss of five 
starters, the field hockey team was not expected to 
perform as well this season. They had to start off the 
season by learning to play together. "When you lose 
five starters on a field of eleven players, you have to 
start by filling holes in the field," explained senior 
Robin Rozycki. 

Before the season, the team established three 
goals. The first was to improve everyday in order to 
reach the point of playing as a team by the end of the 
season. "We always strove to be better. We grew to 
like each other, and wanted to see each other improve 
day to day," Rozycki stated. Head coach Sharon 
Grannies added, "We had a great season. All three 
seniors, Robin Rozycki, Alexi Siglin, and Rachel 
Mott had the best seasons of their careers here at BC. 
They stepped up a level, and forced the underclassmen 
to play up to this level." 

The second goal was to beat a top ten team. The 
win against UConn fulfilled this goal. Beating UConn 
also solidified BC's spot for the Big East playoffs. 
Moreover, they were the first team to defeat UConn on 
their home field in '95. BC also played well against 
fifth ranked Northeastern. "We would like to play 
Northeastern again, now that our team is together. We 
played them in the beginning of the season before we 
were ranked. Now we are a completely different 
team," commented Siglin. 

The final goal, to be ranked in the top twenty, 
was reached with a twelfth place ranking, higher than 
last year. At the Big East Championships, Anne Marie 
Ambros was named Rookie of the Year; Alexi Siglin 
and Andrea Durko were named to the Big East First 
Team; and Marion Fitzgerald and Sara Egnaczyk were 
named to the Big East Second Team. - Sheila Carroll 



"We always strive to be better. We. ..wanted to see 
each other improve every day. " - Robin Rozyck 




Bk-Ft/L-R: H. Coach Sherren Granese, Trainer Sheila Griffen, Janis 
Cornwell, Joy Romsbotham, Rachel Mott, Alexi Siglin, Erin 
McLaughlin, Nicole Statuta, A.Trainer Leanna Mills, A.Coach Jen 
Bouchie, A.Coach David Sculley , Michelle Labonge, Alexis Froelich, 
C.Robin Rozycki, Marion Fitzgerald, Gabrielle Bieg, Kendra 
Medville, C.Sarah Egnaczyk, Jessica Sinco, Anne Marie Ambros, 
Bonnie Larity, Andrea Durko, Katie Gentile, Elizabeth Hays 




Left: Robin Rozycki runs downfield as 
she evades her opponent. 

Center Left: BC players come face to 
face with the opposing team. 

Bottom Left: The girls take the field 
for the game. 

Below: The team listens to a pre-game 
pep talk from the coach. 





S c o 


r 


e 


boa 


r 


d 


< 


Dverall Record 12-7 






Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 


Michigan 


W 


2-1 


Connenticut 


W 


1-0 


U-Mass Amherst 


L 


0-1 


California- 


W 


3-1 


Miami of Ohio 


W 


4-0 


Berkley 






Northwestern 


L 


0-1 


Harvard 


W 


3-1 


BU 


L 


1-5 


Holy Cross 


W 


3-0 


Villanova 


W 


2-1 


Maine 


W 


1-0 


Northeastern 


L 


1-3 


New Hampshire 


W 


2-0 


Providence 


W 


1-0 


Rutgers 


L 


0-2 


Syracuse 


L 


0-1 


Big East 


L 


1-2 


Ball State 


W 


2-1 


Championships 






Rhode Island 


W 


2-1 









Field Hockey 187 




Top: The Lady Eagles dive after the loose puck in an attempt to score. 

Above: The tough BC offense keeps the ball far from their opponent' s 
reach. 

At Right: i he team huddles before their last showing, at the Big East 
Championship. 



188 Field Hockey 



Marc Samale 






Left: Bonnie Larity battles her 
opponent for the puck. 

Bottom Left: The team preps for 
their charge. 

Bottom Right: Jessica Sinco breaks 
away while her teammate looks on 
from across the field. 




Field Hockey 189 



Minutes Away 



The Men's Soccer Team's defeat over Syracuse at 
their opening game in the Big East this year set the 
pace for the rest of the season. Their successes continued 
right through to the end, when the men brought home 
their first ever regular season Big East title. 
Unfortunately, this precedent did not carry over into 
the tournament and to a Big East Championship, but it 
was close. 

The Big East Tournament began with BC as the 
number one seed. This was the third consecutive trip 
to the tournament for the men. The win in the 
quarterfinals overthe University of Connecticut proved 
the Eagles' skill and determination. Sophomore 
midfielder Anthony Buckley cinched the win with a 
nine-yard goal against Connecticut goalkeeper Robb 
Myers. Buckley was the second highest scorer for BC 
this year with seven goals and eight assists in the 
regular season. 

Other outstanding players for the season were Marc 
Bala, Paul Keegan, and newcomers Mat Dunn, Chris 
Lynch, and Keith McDonald. Bala, the senior 
goalkeeper who was ranked number one in the Big 
East, was a Big East defensive player of the week three 
times this season, and gave the team seven shut-outs. 
Keegan came to Boston from Dublin as a senior 
forward. He became the career leading scorer with an 
assist in the tied game against Rutgers. Buckley, Bala, 
and Keegan all also made the Big East First Team. 
Additionally, Tim Lavin made the Big East Second 
Team. 

After the step up to the semi-finals in the Big East 
tournament, BC missed making the final game by just 
under eight minutes. Brian Lahon scored early in the 
first half to give the Eagles an early lead over St. 
John's. Lahon was assisted by Lavin. St. John's did 
not score until there were just under eight minutes left 
in the game. They then scored the winning goal in the 
remaining time. BC did have opportunites to turn it 
around, but they were folied first by the St. John's 
defenders, then by an official call that Paul Johnston' s 
goal, with only forty seconds left, was offsides. 

Despite the result of the tournament, BC had a great 
season. Moreover, next year looks just as good. As 
Head Coach Ed Kelly stated in the Heights, "we will 
only lose three to graduation... so the future is bright 
for the team." - Beverlv Mather 



"We will only lose three to graduation... so the future is 
bright for the team." - Coach Ed Kelly 



190 Soccer 








Opposite Page Top: BC breaks 
away with the ball. 

Bottom: Anthony Buckley heads 
the ball over his opponent. 

This Page Top: The Eagles 
successfully keep the ball out of the 
opponent's reach. 

Bottom: High scorer Paul Keegan 
makes a break away. 




| S c o 


r 


e 


boa 


r 


d 


| Overall Record 11-5-2 






Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 


American 


L 


1-3 


Seton Hall 


W 


1-0 


Virginia 


L 


2-3 


Connecticut 


L 


1-2 


Northeastern 


W 


1-0 


Villanova 


W 


2-0 


Hartford 


w 


3-1 


Harvard 


T 


0-0 


Syracuse 


w 


2-0 


West Virginia 


W 


4-0 


Boston University 


L 


1-2 


Providence 


w 


3-0 


Notre Dame 


W 


3-2 


Rutgers 


T 


1-1 


Pittsburgh 


W 


1-0 


Big East Tourn. 


W 


2-1 


Georgetown 


W 


3-1 


vs. Connecticut 












Big East Tourn. 


L 


2-1 


,| 






vs. St. John's 







Soccer 191 



One Step At A Time 

The Women's Soccer team, in a tough Big East 
conference, found themselves forced to step up to a 
whole new level of play this year. The women had no 
problem with the challenge, and "proved themselves to 
be true competitors, who play an intense, exciting style 
of soccer," according to Coach Terez Biancardi. 

As always there were those players who shone 
through. Senior Capt. Jessica David, junior Jennifer 
Kelley , and senior Melissa Wolf all proved themselves to 
be truly outstanding. Junior April Parker, who was the 
top scorer for BC, was also one of the top twenty scorers 
in the Big East. After the surprise loss of the senior 
keeper, sophomore Valerie Daniel made the move up to 
the starting position with ease, and proved herself as a 
true leader. 

Biancardi praised her team, saying, "They have 
a lot of talent, and whenever they were determined and 
put their minds to winning, they were capable of it." 
Their minds were certainly on the Harvard Invitational 
Tournament, which they won, after tying for first place 
with Harvard last year. The women also displayed their 
exciting offense with shut-outs over Providence, Central 
Connecticut, and Loyola. 

After losing the '94 Big East Tournament in the 
finals, the '95 team missed qualifying for the tournament 
by one game with the disappointing loss to Seton Hall. 
With two more teams joining the conference next year, 
BC, will have to take yet another step up in order to be one 
of the four teams who make the '96 Tournament. "It is 
, extremely important for us to be more committed to 
I excellence, and to demand more of each other so that we 
can reach success and make the Big East Tournament 
next year," stated Biancardi. - Beverly Mather 



'... true competitors, who play an intense, exciting 
style of soccer. " - Coach Biancardi 




Back to Front/L-R:Head Coach Terez Biancardi, Jill Kislia, Christine 
Safriet, Megan Shaughnessy, Kate Forgiano, Kelly Cross, Leigh 
Cofran, Kiera McKeon, Asst. Coach Kristine Eckert, Kerin SikorsRi, 
Megan Burns, Darlene Sliva, Deidre Byrnes, April Parker, Jennifer 
Kelley, Anne Schneider, Alex Chamberlain, Valerie Daniel, Kristina 
Szczepansk, Capt.Jessica David, Capt. Kara Nance, Capt. Allison 
David, Melissa Wolf / Missing: Asst. Coach Amy Coakley, Trainer 
Jennifer Baxter 















Opposite Page - 

Top Right: Senior midfielder 

Melissa Wolf shoots for a goal 

Middle Right: A powerful kick 
shows BC's intensity against 
Harvard. 

Bottom Right: Deidre Burns fights 
for a go at the ball. 

This Page - 

Right: Captain Jessica David steals 

the ball away from her opponent. 

Bottom Left: BC dribbles down field 
for a goal. 




S c o 


r 


e 


boa 


r 


d 


Overall Record 9-7-2 






Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 


Central Connecticut 


W 


5-0 


Harvard 


L 


1-6 


Rhode Island 


T 


2-2 


St. John's 


W 


2-0 


Villanova 


W 


2-1 


Providence 


w 


4-0 


Hartford 


L 


0-2 


Seton Hall 


L 


0-3 


Georgetown 


W 


3-0 


Dartmouth 


W 


2-1 


Rutgers 


L 


0-3 


New Hampshire 


T 


1-1 


Connecticut 


L 


0-4 


Brown 


L 


0-1 


Harvard Tournament 


W 


3-2 


Notre Dame 


L 


1-3 


Vs. Monmouth 






Loyola 


W 


6-0 


Harvard Tournament 


W 


2-0 








Vs. Columbia 













Women's Soccer 193 



Coming Together As One 



Hard work, determination, and perseverance 
are some of the many qualities that can be associated 
with the 1995 Men's Cross Country team. In 
preparation for the Nationals meet, these young athletes 
began in June and trained ten to eleven times per week, 
under the guidance of Head Coach Randy Thomas. 
Despite the many obstacles they were forced to 
overcome, such as various injuries and illnesses in the 
beginning of the season, the team managed to unite 
and compete as one. In the end they agreed that their 
season was strong and that as a whole they performed 
well. 

Although the NCAA recognizes track as an 
individual sport, Cross Country is in many ways a 
team sport. In each meet, the top five runner's scores 
from each team are calculated, and the team whose 
score is the lowest wins the meet. This year' s team was 
predominately composed of upperclassmen; seniors 
Chris Georgules, a two time All American, Eric 
Blanchard, John Waessaner, and junior Darren Keenan 
were all great assets. 

Blanchard was able to return this season after 
suffering from an achilles injury last year which 
prevented him from competing. He stated that it was 
wonderful to be able to "run to potential, and be a 
factor of the team once again." Waessaner, who recently 
recovered from surgery, believed that overall the 
season went well. He commented that "this year's 
team had the pieces to become a top 10 team in the 
nation, but no one had time to put the puzzle together." 

-Jen Colette 



This year s team had the pieces to become a 
top ten team in the nation. " -John Waessaner 





Bk-Ft/L-R: A.Coach Jackie Adams, A.Coach Walter Curry, Tom 
Marx, Brian Lavelle, Jason Elliot, Darren Keenan, Brendan Murray, 
Head Coach Randy Thomas, A.Coach Kathy Franey , Chris Georgules, 
Jason White, Eric Blanchard, Sherod Cozart, David Meyers. John 
Wassenaar, Tom Hunt, Pete Simons, Brendan Ring, Matt Blecha, Eric 
Shaughnessy, Joe O'Conner 
194 Men's Cross Country 




Men's Cross Country 195 



For 



The 



Record 



The 1 995- 1 996 Men' s Winter Track team felt 
that the season went extremely well due to the 
experience of the runners as well as the coaches. The 
team is maturing and working together with the close 
individual attention given by their two assistant coaches 
and this could be the reason for their record breaking. 
Assistant Coach Jackie Adams spent her summer at 
camps enhancing her knowledge of jumping and multi- 
events. Adams brings her youth and her experience 
from running the heptathalon at Central Connecticut 
State University to her coaching. Coach Walter Curry 
also brought his expertise to the field, based on his own 
past experiences at Iowa Sate University as a hurdler. 

Junior Sam Raia broke BC's record for the 
javelin with a 199' 11 3/4" throw in the IC4A 
Championship in '94-'95. This season he is 
concentrating on the javelin and the 55 meter hurdles. 
He came in second in the The New Enland Challenge 
and took first at the Greater Boston Open. Twins, 
Mark and Sean McGehearty, both have All- American 
recongnition. Mark is a two -time outdoor All- 
American in the hammer throw, which he has improved 
to 218' 1", another BC record. Sean captured a first 
place finish in the 35Tb weight competition at the 
Greater Boston Open in 96' with a 66' 3" throw which 
qualified him for NCAA. Senior Co-Captain Tom 
Hunt qualified for IC4A in the 800 meter (1:53.2). 
Sophomore Eric Shaugnessy qualified for IC4A in 
two events, the 800 meter (1:53,3) and the 500 meter 
(1 :05.2). Eric Blanchard and Brenden Ring qualified 
for IC4A in the 3000 meter (8:29.4 and 8:27.3). The 
record setting team had a lot to be proud of and will be 
sure to continue excellence in the future . -Liz Vilardi 



"The season went extremely well due to the 
experience of the runners... " - Sam Raia 





















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Elena 


K. Vizvary 



196 Men's Winter Track 








Top Opposite Page: 

BC runner manages to 
outkick his opponents 
at the finish line. 

Bottom Left 
Opposite Page: This 
BC runner prepares to 
pass the other runners 
around the last turn. 

Bottom Right 
Opposite Page: In 

relays, every second 
counts during a 
handoff. 

Left: BC sprinter 
awaits anxiously for 
the sound of the gun. 

Bottom: These 
teammates push each 
other to the finish 
line. 



Elena K. Vizvary 








S c o 


r e 


boa 


r d 


Overall Record (2-1) 






Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 




Harvard 
NewEng.Challenge 

Cup Trials 
NewEng.Challenge 

Cup 
Terrier Classic 
Harvard Select 


L 65-79 
3 rd of 5 

l sl of 9 

NTS* 
NTS* 


UNH 

Vermont 

Big East Champ. 

New Eng. Champ. 

IC4A Champ. 

NCAA Champ. 


W 86.5-60 

W86.5-34.5 

11 th of 13 

N/A 

N/A 
N/A 








*No Team Scoring 



Men's Winter Track 197 



The 1995 Women's Cross Country team began 
the season with high goals, which included ending the 
season with a trip to the NCAA's in Ames, Iowa. "We 
were hoping to place fourth in the Big East meet, and 
become one of the top two New England teams at the 
ECAC Championships in order to earn a trip to the 
NCAA," stated head coach Randy Thomas. Thomas 
also hoped to place in the top twelve at the national 
meet. 

Thomas' high hopes were well grounded by the 
caliber of his runners. Five of the girls made it to the 
Nationals last year. Thomas was confident that these 
five would be even stronger this year due to their 
increased experience and maturity. 

The 1995 team was led by junior Co-Captains 
Amy Lyman and Caroline Pimblett. Additionally, 
sophomore Angie Graham, who was out last season due 
to an injury, became a three time All American during 
the course of this season. The top seven was rounded out 
by senior Susan Pothier, sophomores Jodie Lake and 
Ann Baldelli, and freshman Meghan Dwyer. 

The team fulfilled their goals by not only 
qualifying for the Big East Championship, but also by 
placing fourth. The Lady Eagles were only beaten by 
the second, third, and fifth teams in the nation. Graham 
and Lyman both earned spots on the All Big East Team 
for their performances. Graham placed 3rd, in 17:47, 
and Lyman placed 10th, in 17:59. The stellar work of 
the team, as a whole, at the championship brought them 
up to the ranking of seventeenth nationally. 

-Jodi Bandola 



"We were hoping to... become one of the top 
two New England teams. " - Coach Thomas 

















Bk-Ft/L-R: A.Coach Jackie Adams, A.Coach Walter Curry, Darby 
Rice, Sara Mulligan, Lynn Boksanske, Kim Landry, Jodie Lake, 
Angie Graham, Jennifer Long, Head Coach Randy Thomas, A.Coach 
Kathy Franey, Ann Baldelli, Sandra Nagy, Nicole Esposito, Ann 
Nicholson, Fran Spaulding, Erika Schlomer, Caroline Pimblett, Allison 
Phears, Katie White, Renee Gorski, Christine Thibault, Amy Lyman, 
Johanna Greenberg, Megan Gayman 



Top: Angie Grahm pushes forward to the finish line ahead of 

her opponents. 

Above: Coach Randy Thomas advises a runner before the 

beginning of a race. 

Opposite Page Top: Every second counts as this runner 

attemps to finsh first. 

Opposite Page Bottom: Two runners pose with a spectator 

after the finish of another exhausting race. 




Scoreboar 


d 


Overall Record 

Opponent Score 

Michigan L 20-38 
Murray Keating Invitational 2 nd out of 8 
NCAA 5 th out of 22 
Big East Championship 4 th out of 13 



Women's Cross Country 199 



Depth 



and 



Talent 



The 1995-1996 Women's Track team began the 
season with much promise. Head Coach Randy Thomas 
held the high aspirations of qualifying many runners 
for the NCAA Championships in March. With the 
guidance of a multitude of coaches, each with his/her 
own area of expertise, the team had no trouble fulfilling 
their self-set high goals. 

At the New England Challenge Cup the Lady Eagles 
blew away the competition with a first place finish and 
an overall score of 216 points. Senior Andrea Melton 
had an exceptional day, winning both the 55m hurdles 
in 8.37 and the long jump with 18'4". Sophomore 
Jodie Lake took the first in the 800m with a 2:17.33. 
Two other firsts were by juniors Any a Maurer in the 
high jump with a jump of 5'4" and to Amy Lyman in 
the mile for a 5:02.85. 

The women went on from this standout showing to 
in the New England Track and Field Championships, 
held at Bowdoin, where they tied for second place with 
UConn, behind Northeastern. Melton again won the 
55m hurdles with a time of 8.09. Lyman won the 
1000m run with a 2:52.44. Sophomore Angie Graham 
won the mile in 4:44.37. Other first place finishes 
came in from the 4x800 to Lyman and Graham. 
Melton also received the Athlete of the Week award 
from BC, for the week ending January 22. 

According to Thomas, the three girls, Lyman, 
Graham, and Lake, qualified provisionally for the 
NCAA Championships in the mile run at the end of 
February. Thomas also believed that the distance 
medley relay team could finish in the top eight in the 
country at Nationals. - Jodi Bandola 



Women's Winter Track - 1995-1996 




Elena K. Vizvary 



200 Women's Winter Track 




Kerry Girvin I 




Opposite Page - 

Bottom Left: This Eagle's runner prepares to explode out of the blocks 

when the gun is fired. 

Bottom Right: BC runner glides by her opponent after a hand-off in the 

relay. 

Left: Once again, the Lady Eagles lead the way to the finish line in many 

of their races. 

This Page - 

Bottom Left: Determination is the key to this runner's success as she 

nears the end of her race. 

Below: BC runner passes her opponent as they round the corner to the 

finish line. 




Elena K. Yiz\ ar\ 



Women's Winter Track 201 



Kerr)' Gin' in 



Playing Up To Par 



The 1995 Men's Golf Team has, according 
to senior Captain Stephen Shunk, "continued the 
BC tradition of having a good time and playing 
some good golf." The team was ranked fourth in 
New England this season, under head coach Peter 
Bigham. The placed consistently well throughout all 
tournaments during the fall season, with their most 
impressive showings in the Yale Invitational 
(seventh out of twenty-seven), and at the ECAC 
qualifier (fifth out of twenty-two). 

The team was led by Co-Captains Shunk, 
senior Matthew Stanchek, and senior Shane Dooley. 
Shunk added, "It has been great to compete for four 
years with the other Co-Captains... we have 
definitely grown together." 

The team has definitely grown together, and 
had a well rounded roster in the '95 season with 
four seniors, two juniors, three sophomores, and 
two freshmen. The men's golf team is looking 
forward to an even more successful season in '96 
when the underclassmen will have gained more 
experience on the courses. 

- Mistie Psaledas 



"[We've] continued the BC tradition of having 
a good time and playing some good golf, " 
- Co-Captain Stephen Shunk 




s 


core 


b 


oar 


d 




Overall Record (1-0) 






Opponent 




Score 






Yale Invit. 




7 th of 27 






Holy Cross 




W 392-423 






New Hamp. Invit. 




11 th of 15 






Big East Champ. 




6 th of 9 






ECAC Qualifier 




5 th of 22 






Dartmouth Invit. 




12 lh of 16 






ECAC Champ. 




NoTeamScore 






New Eng. Champ. 




N/A 





:02 Men's Golf 





)p: The women's golf team pose for a picture before they begin another 

und of competition. 

pposite Page: A few team members pose in front of a tournament 

urse. 

bove: The lady golfers smile as they await their next stroke. 



Overcoming Adversity 



"Our team has heart, but it has been a frustrating 
season... We 're still growing, and we've got a really 
young team," said sophomore Rhodora Freyvogel. 
The BC women's golf team struggled through a tough 
fall season - a season which included a short team for 
three of the tournaments. 

The team of six golfers was led by junior 
captain Gretchen Kattke. Kattke boasts that their coach, 
Natalie Galligan, is "geared toward golf - she just 
wants the team to get out there and play!" Kattke also 
added in about her teammates, "Katie Shields has been 
a key attribute... at first it was hard for her to fit in as a 
freshman competitively, but she really did fit in well. 
Rhodora also has a great first season." 

The lady golfers scheduled a total of five 
tournaments. Two of those, however, they could not 
enter as a team because there were not enough golfers. 
"It's frustrating when you can't enter a tournament 
with a full team, but you have some of us that are there 
ready to play," stated Kattke. 

At the Dartmouth Invitational, the girls placed 
10th out of 14, 12th out of 16 at the Yale Invitational, 
and 11th out of 15 at the ECAC Championships. 
Tournaments are played during the weekends and 
require the team to stay "mentally focused" stated 
Freyvogel. She also added, "We need to stay positive 
- now we've seen the courses we will play next year, 
and we've become more knowledgeable." 

- Mistie Psaledas 



■ 






"Our team has heart, but it has been a 
frustrating season... " - Rhodora Ft 



- Rhodora Freyvogel 



Scoreboa 



r d 



Opponent 

Dartmouth Invit. 
Yale Invit. 
Rutgers Invit. 
Mt. Holyoke Invit. 
ECAC Champ. 



Score 

10 th of 14 

12 lh of 16 

No Team Score 

No Team Score 

11 th of 15 



Women's Golf 203 



All Weather Fans 

Imagine you are an intrinsic part of game day. 
Part of your job is to smile, and to be genuinely 
excited, no matter what, all the way to the end. The 
other part is to pump up the crowd. This is normally 
accomplished with daring feats, namely standing on 
top of someone, who is on top of someone else, while 
clapping and yelling "Go BC!" Or perhaps by holding 
up a girl in one hand then tossing and catching her. Or 
by flat out throwing someone twenty or so feet up so 
that they can spin through the air. This may sound 
crazy, or it may sound like a lot of fun. Maybe it is a 
little of both, but it is absolutely much more work than 
the Varsity Football and Basketball Cheerleading 
Team, made it seem. 

These fourteen men and women learned, above 
all else, the value of honest teamwork. Perhaps it was 
the very real danger involved with what they did, but 
conceivably more so than any other team, they became 
one entity. "After spending so much time together, we 
became a family in the truest sense. There were good 
times and bad times, but at the end of the day there was 
no choice but to trust, and to look out for each other," 
commented Co-Captain Jim Bolen. 

The time which they put in is impressive to say 
the least. Their season is eight months long. 
Additionally, unlike many other major universities, 
our Cheerleaders do not receive scholarships. Senior 
Keith Jaret explained their dedication by saying, "Even 
though we do not get scholarships, and therefore most 
of us shuffle working in addition to school work, 
practicing, and traveling time, we act as though we do. 
We rise to the same level as every other team out 
there." 

-Beverly Mather 



"We became a family in the truest sense. " 

- Jim Bolen 










Beverly Mather 



Top/ L to R: Steve Giordano, Sam Shiroff, Tomen Tse, 
Capt. Jim Bolen, Rob Kvamme, Keith Jaret, Rob Antha 

Bottom/ L to R: Gina Perry, Jen Brodeur, Ellen Jackman, Capt. 
Beth Armstrong, Amber Trudel, Tamatha Baker, April Young 

Missing: Coach Steve Sillito 

204 Cheerleading 




Elena K. Vizvary 



Top: Amber Trudel reaches for the sky. 

Bottom: They don't mind getting tired when each push-up means another 

point. 




Beverly Mather 



Top: The team starts off the season as enthusiastically as 

ever at the Kickoff Classic against Ohio State. 

Bottom Left: Practice for Gina Perry and April Young 

requires nerves of steel and complete trust in their teammates 

on the floor; there are no mats at the Plex. 

Bottom Right: The Cheerleading season extends right into 

the winter with a move from Football on Alumni Field to 

Basketball in Conte Forum. 



Cheerleading 205 



digging Deep 

The 1995 Women's Volleyball team was 
strong; unfortunately, their record of 12-24 did not 
reflect the effort and committment that the players put 
into this season. At their home tournament, the women 
played their best in the five game, three hour win 
against Providence. Co-Captains Christine Morelli 
and Deanna Herman had hoped for a better season, but 
they thought that they played well when they went to 
Georgia to compete with nationally ranked teams 
Georgia Tech and Clemson. 

The senior players of the team are Morelli, 
who "is a consistent defensive and right side player," 
Herman, "an all around consistent player," and Kristen 
Roberts, "the key middle blocker," as described by 
Coach Nadine Lilavois. Another vital player on the 
team is quarterback, Karen Trine, a junior. Coach 
Lilavois also stated that, "the team is looking forward 
to the fall knowing that next season will be better 
because of the girls' talent and determination." 

- Beverly Mather 



"Next season will be better because of the girls ' 
talent and determination. " -Coach Lilovais 




Courtesy of Sports Information 

Bk-Ft/L-R: Asst. Coach Andy Mather, Natalie Scott, Kristen Roberts, 
Cathleen Carpenter, Capt. Deanna Herman, Head Coach Nadine 
Lilavois, Mng. Frantz Trouillot, Eileen Broderick, Capt. Christine 
Morelli, Karen Trine, Trainer Lisa Milani, Katie Tortoello, Amy 
Laurence, Courtney Grubb 




Top: Kristen Roberts and Karen Trine go up together to block the shot by 

St. John's. 

Bottom: Karen Trine prepares her powerful serve. 




Hidcki Azuma 




Top Left: Courtney Grubb sails into the air for a sure Ace. 
Bottom Left: Kristen Roberts attempts to spike over her opponent. 
Below: Amy Laurence drives her shot to the Huskies' side of the court. 




J_i. 



W I 




Hidcki Azuma 




Hideki Azuma 









Hidekj Azuma 






















S c o r 


e 


boa 


r 


d 


Overall Record (12-24-0) 








Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 




Rhode Islandlnvit. 






Hofstra Invitational 








vs. Delaware 


w 


3-0 


vs. Cal-St. Sac. 


L 


0-3 




vs. Rhode Island 


L 


0-3 


vs. Illinois State 


L 


0-3 




vs. Mississippi 


L 


0-3 


vs. Hofstra 


L 


1-3 




vs. Delaware 


L 


1-3 


vs. Cent. Conn 


W 


3-0 




Jacksonville 


W 


3-1 


Siena 


L 


0-3 




Eagle Classic 






Providence 


L 


1-3 




vs. Harvard 


L 


0-3 


UMass-Amherst 


L 


0-3 




vs. Hartford 


W 


3-1 


Syracuse 


L 


1-3 




vs. Northeastern 


W 


3-1 


Pittsburgh 


L 


0-3 




vs. Providence 


w 


3-2 


Yale 


L 


1-3 




Georgia St. Classic 






St. John's 


L 


0-3 




vs. Georgia Tech 


L 


0-3 


Connecticut 


L 


1-3 




vs. Georgia State 


w 


3-1 


Georgetown 


L 


1-3 




ACC-Big East Chal. 






Villanova 


L 


0-3 




vs. Clemson 


L 


0-3 


Brown 


W 


3-0 




vs. Georgia Tech 


L 


0-3 


Rutgers 


W 


3-1 




Drexel Invitational 






Seton Hall 


L 


0-3 




vs. MD-Baltimore L 


0-3 


Central Connecticut 


W 


3-2 




vs. Drexel 


W 


3-2 


West Virginia 


L 


1-3 




Virginia 


W 


3-1 


Notre Dame 


L 


0-3 



Volleyball 207 



The fall season went fairly well for the Men's 
Tennis Team this year. Considering the youth of the 
team, the wins against the University of Connecticut 
and Central Connecticut University were achievemnets 
to be proud of. The only four players who returned 
from the ' 94 season were Co-Captains Jonathan Wright 
and Stephen Murray, David Huck, and Rominder 
Varma. 

Coach Nigel Bentley stated that "the team is 
everything a coach could dream for because there is so 
much enthusiaism and committment from the players. 
They have strong tennis knowledge, which will help 
the team rebuild itself." 

Although this season's performance heavily 
relied on the seniors, the other team members also 
contributed to their achievements. However, the best 
years of college tennis lie ahead for the underclassmen. 
Hopefully the expected successes for the future will 
begin with the Spring Season in 1996, which Bentley 
is quite optimistic about. 

- Beverly Mather 



"This team is everything a coach could 
dream for... " - Coach Nigel Bentley 




Elena K. Vizvary 



208 Men's Tennis 





Opposite Page - 

Top: Good teamwork is shown in 
a doubles match. 

Middle: BC player volleys the ball 
with ease. 

Bottom Left: The team takes a 
break in between sets. 

Bottom Right: BC team member 
shows good form moving to reach 
the shot. 

This Page - 

Top: Doubles member plays the 
net while his partner serves. 

Bottom: Eagle player reaches back 
for a powerful serve. 



Elena K. Vizvary 












Scoreboar 


d 


Overall Record (2-1-0) 






Opponent Score 






Connecticut W 5-2 
Central Connecticut W 5-2 
Boston University L 2-5 
Cornell Classic No Team Scoring 
ITA Individual No Team Scoring 





Men's Tennis 209 



E 



ONFIDENCE ON THE COURT 



The Women's Tennis team is looking forward 
to a great spring season in 1996. Last year, they were 
ranked third in the Big East, and in the top sixty 
nationally. Although West Virginia and Notre Dame 
will be added to the Big East this year, coach Mark 
Burns feels "confident that the team will do well, 
because this fall the girls are motivated to do even 
better." 

The team had wins over top schools Yale, 
Brown, and Dartmouth this fall. These victories, 
together with the team effort of all the girls, helped 
them live up to all expectations. Co- Captains Hope 
McAndrew and Sarah Malone are also excited about 
the tournament in Miami where they will be playing 
against Miami University, North Carolina, and the 
University of Georgia this spring. The highlight of the 
season, however, will be the spring break trip to 
Hawaii. 

McAndrew and Malone are two of the top six 
players for the Lady Eagles. The six is finished by 
Christina Malone, Shannon Bryne, Kara Swanson, 
and Carey Ann DeNefrio. 

-Beverly Mather 



"This fall the girls are motivated to do even 
better." -Coach Mark Burns 



210 Women's Tennis 





Opposite Page - 

Top: Lady Eagle follows through on a backhand. 

Bottom: BC woman makes an easy volley. 

This Page - 

Left: BC player readies herself for the shot. 

Below: Team member keeps her feet moving, and makes the 
difficult return. 

Bottom Left: Eagle player reaches up to return a high lob. 



Kerry Girvin 







s 


core 


b 


oar 


d 






Overall Record (3-0-0) 








Opponent 




Score 








Syracuse Invitational 




No Team Scoring 








Yale 




W 5-4 








Harvard Invitational 




No Team Soring 








Brown 




W 5-1 








Brown Invitational 




No Team Scoring 








ITA Team Champ. 




7th out of 8 








Dartmouth 




W 5-4 








ITA Invitational 




No Team Scoring 





Women's Tennis 211 



Coasting Into National Rankings 



Last year" s Sailing team was an inexperienced, 
unranked, one. However, the year together paid off to 
the fullest possible extent. This year, the young group 
of sailors returned on the warpath. They fulfilled their 
hopes of improving over last year's performance, and 
doing the best they could as a team, exceptionally 
well. 

This season was said to be one of the best ever. 
They were ranked the highest in their history: fourth in 
the country. This ranking came off of the win at the 
New England Championships. 

For the first time ever, this team, of Pete 
Spaulding, Chris Murray, Jenn Rovengo, Liz Connoly, 
Ted Grayson, and Sarah Skie, won the Shell Regatta, 
a regatta with sixteen teams from all over the East 
coast, which qualified them for the Atlantic Coast 
Championships. The Eagles put in an excellent 
performance, finishing 6th overall. 

The team is looking forward to their spring 
season, for which their goal is qualifying for the 
National Championships. Looking at the fall season, 
they should anticipate a great chance. 

When talking about the team, they were 
rightfully excited about the fall season. Looking back 
at her career with the sailing team, Liz Connoly said 
"This was one of the best things that ever happened to 
me at B.C." The coaches also played an important role 
in the outlook that the entire team maintained. Connoly 
stated "Coach Reid is phenomenal." The coaches 
should be commended for their concern with each 
member as an individual, and their encouragement of 
a high morale; their tactics obviously worked. 

- Cathleen O'Malley 



"This was one of the best things that ever happened 
to me at B. C. " -Liz Connoly 






Below: The Eagles sail off as the royalty of the waters. 





Courtesy of the Sailing Team 



Above: BC pulls out ahead of the competition. (The boats 
are supplied by the hosting team for each race.) 

Right: The race is close as the boats come to the first turn. 



212 Sailing 




Courtesy of the Sailing Team 

Top: It's smooth sailing for the Boston College boats. 

Directly Above: BC women work together on this leg of their 
journey. 



Courtesy of the Sailing Team 



Sailing 213 



Making Waves 



The 1 995 Water Polo season will go down in the 
minds of the coaches and the players as a transition year 
highlighted by many outstanding individual efforts. 
Overall, the team placed 6 th out of 1 0, with a record of 7- 
14, in the Eastern Water Polo Assc. North Conference. 
Although the year was described by coach G. T. Ladd as 
"dissappointing," many important milestones were set 
by individual players. Also, one must keep in mind that 
they played one of the toughest schedules on the East 
Coast. 

Amongst the distinguished efforts was that of 
Senior Co-Captain Marcus Williams. In addition to 
being the team' s Most Valuable Player and the Offensive 
Player of the Year, Williams was named to the All-East 
Team at the position of driver for the second consecutive 
season. This year, he led the team with 39 goals, 90 
attempts, 13 assists, and 60 points. The team record for 
steals was broken by freshman Eric Malzone, with 52 
takeaways. Malzone also earned the titles of Rookie of 
the Year, and Defensive Player of the Year. Additionally, 
Sophomore Steve Yap set a new mark for two-point 
goals, with seven for the year. 

Coach Ladd was enthusiastic about the potential 
the team has in the next few years. This year' s team was 
very young, with 5 of the 7 starting players being 
underclassmen. As this is Ladd' s third year as coach, he 
is beginning to see the positive results of a stong recruiting 
effort in the past couple of years. According to The 
Heights, if the team continues to get "top-notch recruits," 
everyone "will realize what a great sport this is." 

- Mark Sekula 



"Everyone 'will realize what a great 
sport this is. ' " -The Heights 





4y*' 







Elena K. Vizvary 



S c o 


r e 


boa 


r d 


Overall Record (7-13-0) 




Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 


Cambridge Inv. 




MIT 


W 21-14 


vs. JohnsHop. 


L 7-15 


Brown 


L 6-23 


vs. MIT 


W 14-8 


UMass- Amherst 


L 6-21 


St. Francis 


L 10-14 


Merch. Marine 


W 21-11 


Fordham 


W 26-10 


Harvard 


L 11-13 


Harvard 


L 9-13 


EWPA Playoffs 


L 1-20 


MIT 


W 13-11 


vs. Queens 


W 14-6 


UMass-Amh. 


L 6-20 


vs. MIT 


L 8-11 


Iona 


W 25-15 


vs. Harvard 




Queens 


L 15-29 






UMa-Amh.Inv. 








vs. Navy 


L 11-23 






vs. Queens 


L 11-18 






vs. Richmond 


L 4-14 








Elena K. Vizary 

Top: BC team member shows that Eagles deserve as much respect in the< 
water as in the sky. 

Middle: The team takes a time out to re-plan their strategy. 

Bottom: BC player passes to his teammate around the opponent. 





The River Wild 

Crew at Boston College has been referred to as 
the club which is a sport. Between the sheer athletic 
skill and the grueling practices at four or five in the 
morning, the title was well earned by these impressive 
men and women. 

The 1995 fall season was a successful and 
exciting one for both varsity squads. The women's 
varsity team, lead by Co-Captains Courtney Standish 
and Amy Cooper, won the Head of the Connecticut. 
They also placed 24 th in the Head of the Charles, 
beating their arch rivals UMass-Amherst, Navy, and 
UMichigan. They were the second fastest Division II 
boat overall. They were also the 1995 defending 
champions of the Points Trophy, which is awarded to 
the best Division II Crew team in the country. 

The men's varsity and lightweight teams both 
placed 1 st in the Lowell Textile River Regatta. At the 
Head of the Charles, the lightweight team placed 12* 
out of 40, and were the fifth fastest nationally. Coach 
Dave O'Neil believed they were so successful because 
"...for the past couple of years the teams have had a 
family atmosphere where everyone cheers for one 
another." -Jessica Violette 



"...The crew teams have had a family 
atmosphere where everyone cheers for 
one another. " - Coach O 'Neil 



: The Lady Eagles pull away in their appearance at the Head of the 

les. 

die: The men's team displays the perfect synchronization required 

I a contender. 

om: BC takes part in one of Boston's greatest athletic traditions. 




Above: The women's team huddles before their race in the Head of 
the Charles. Crew 215 




Courtesy of Carl Wolf Studios 



Courtesy of Carl Wolf Studios 



"A Young Team Shows 



216 Basketball 



Opposite Page - 

Top Left: Mickey Curley goes up for 

the dunk. 

Top Right: Andy Bedard looks for a 

receiver. 

Bottom Left: Assistant Coach Paul 

Biancardi reviews plays on the sideline. 

Bottom Right: Pat Bosworth dribbles 

down-court looking to score. 

This Page - 

Left: The Eagles get psyched up before 

the game. 

Bottom Left: Danya Abrams blocks 

his opponent's shot. 

Below: Granger and Abrams watch as 

the team adds two more points to their 

score. 

Bottom Right: Keenan Jourdon 

watches the signals for their next play. 




ts Strength 



Courtesy of Carl Wolf Studios 



Basketball 217 



Above And Beyond 



There were no seniors on the 1996 Men's 
Basketball team. They were ranked last in the pre- 
season polls. So how was it that they became one of the 
Top 25 in the nation? Perhaps the team was so good 
because each member was so good. 

Abrams had another amazing season, winning 
the Big East rebounding title and All-Big East First 
Team honors. He also ranked 10 th on BC's career 
scoring list, beating his coach's record. Penn showed 
a poise rarely seen in rookie players. He also became 
one of our most consistent scorers, dazzling the crowd 
with NBA range three-pointers. He earned Big East 
Rookie of the Year, and a place on the league's All- 
Rookie Team. Jourdon was not only a key defensive 
player, but also came out as more of an offensive force 
than ever before. He scored a career high 19 points in 
the win over Pitt in the first round of the Big East 
tournament. Granger was the same dynamic offensive 
player we saw last year, and rounded out his game by 
becoming more consistent on defense. He was 2 nd on 
the team for three-pointers and notched his 1 8 th double- 
double in the second tournament game. Woodward 
continued to show the calm leadership he showed last 
year, while becoming a more aggressive player, scoring 
in the double figures eleven times. Thomas stepped up 
to become one of the starters by the end of the season, 
shooting at least 50% in 9 of the last 12 games of the 
season. Curley showed more maturity and confidence 
this season, becoming a monster on the court and 
leading the team in blocking. Christianson proved 
himself as one of the best passers around, making no 
lookers that would baffle the pros. Bedard showed 
great potential especially when filling in for Woodward 
while he was injured. Bosworth, Fox, and Piwerka 
showed the depth of the team by consistently replacing 
the starters with finesse. Finally, two walk-ons joined 
the Eagles: Kostas Manglos from Athens, and Greg 
Bartoli from Colgate. Manglos came off the bench in 
the Hartford game and scored 1 2 points after spending 
only two days at BC. Bartoli did not see any playing 
time this season. 

To say that Big East Co-Coach of the year Jim 
O'Brien was pleased by his team is an understatement. 
He stated, "we are coming together as a team and 
going beyond all the expectations set forth in the 
beginning." It means so much to surprise the skeptics 
and the pessimists who misjudged the potential of a 
team which brought itself into another stratosphere. 

- Bev Mather 



"We ore... going beyond all the expectations set 
forth in the beginning. " -Coach Jim O'Brien 



18 Men's Basketball 




Shawn T. Mead 




Top: Sophmore Duane Woodword displays why Basketball is 

considered an aesthetically pleasing sport. 
Bottom: Bevan Thomas cuts in front of his opponent in his drive to the 
hoop. 




Shawn T. Mead 



Top: Freshman super star Scoonie Penn proves yet again that being a 

little guy does not have to matter in basketball. 
Bottom Right: Danya Abrams. a marquee player for BC. brings the ball 

around a Holy Cross guard during his rush to the basket. 
Bottom Left: Junior wing Bevan Thomas shoots right around his 

opponents' attempt to block. 

Men's Basketball 219 




Courtesy of Carl Wolf Studios 

Top Left: Antonio Granger makes a jump shot over his opponent. 
Top Right: Andy Bedard awaits a pass on the court. 
Bottom Left: Bevan Thomas streches to reach the net. 
Bottom Right: Captain Danya Abrams concentrates on his foul 
shot. 



220 Basketball 





Courtesy of Carl Wolf Studios 



Courtesy of Carl Wolf Studios 

Top Left: Nate Fox dunks the ball. 

Top Right: Duane Woodward looks for 

an open teammate. 

Bottom Left: The team discusses their 

strategy during a time out. 

Bottom Right: "Scoonie" Penn dodges 

his oponnent while looking to receive a 

pass. 



Basketball 221 



The Best Of The Best 



On the way out of the more than intense BC- 
UMass game at the Fleet Center, an anonymous BC 
fan was heard to say, "Now we know that BC can play 
with any team in the country." This statement summed 
up what was the most exciting, and for some, the most 
surprising aspect of this year's basketball team. We 
had a very young team. Over and over, however, the 
extensive talent of our team shone through their 
inexperience. 

The run of exciting play against national 
contenders began with the win over Louisville. At the 
time, Louisville was ranked nineteenth. BC was 
unranked, having only played two regular season 
games prior to this meeting. Notably, BC did not just 
win this game, they dominated. The match-up ended 
in an 81-67 stomping of the Cardinals. 

Next, came the game against UConn. UConn 
is annually a top ten team. This year, they were ranked 
ninth when BC met them. BC was still not ranked 
within the top twenty-five. With Danya Abrams, 
usually the go-to-guy, out for the last minutes because 
of foul trouble, things should have been bleak for the 
Eagles. However, they only lost by one point. One 
point is a foul shot, or in this case, scoring a two pointer 
instead of a three. Either way, it is close, much closer 
than BC "should have" come. 

However, it was in the most highly publicized 
college basketball game in Boston's recent history, 
BC vs. UMass, that silenced any remaining doubts of 
the Eagle's potential. In the mind's of many it was no 
contest, UMass would blow BC away. Instead, the 
game was one of the best anyone in Boston has seen in 
a long time. BC led through much of the game, 
including a thirteen point lead in the first half. The play 
on both sides was clean and dynamic. The game was 
tied with only 1 :24 left to play. For the sellout croud at 
the Fleet Center, it felt like an NCAA Tournament 
game instead of a season game between two supposedly 
mis-matched teams. Even Coach Jim O'Brien stated 
to the media, " This may have been the single best 
atmosphere for a game that I've been involved in." 

The Eagles went on to earn a place in the 
NCAA Tournament, a goal which was not even a 
consideration for the "realists" at the beginning of the 
season. Welcome to the Eagles' reality everyone, as 
they say "Always believe in BC!" 

- Bev Mather 



Now we know that BC can play with any team 
in the country. " -Anonymous 



222 Men's Basketball 





Courtesy of Sports Information 



Top-Bottom/L-R: Assc. Head Coach Rick Boyages, Admin. Asst. 
Tom Devitt, Asst. Coach Dave Spiller, Keenan Jourdon, Mike Piwerka, 
Team Capt. Danya Abrams,Mickey Curley, Nate Fox, Manager Larry 
Hare, Asst. Coach Paul Biancardi,Manager Adam Nelson, Manager 
Sean McDonnell, James "Scoonie Penn",Andy Bedard, Antonio 
Granger, Head Coach Jim O' Brien, Bevan Thomas, Brad Christianson, 
Duane Woodward, Manager Marques Williams . 
Not pictured: Pat Bosworth, Kostas Maglos, Greg Bartoli, Trainer 
L andy Shrout 



Left: Louisville watches in dismay as the ball literally slips out of their 
lingers thanks to the imposing BC defense. 

Opposite Page - 

Below: BC uses techniques like double-teaming to give nationally ranked 
teams something to think about. 

This Page - 

Below: Junior Danya Abrams added the Jam to his repertoire this year. 
(Much to the dismay of his opponents.) 




Shawn T. Mead 

















S c o 


r 


e 


b o 


a r d 


Overall Record (18-10) 






Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 




Buffalo 


W 


89-49 


St. John's 


W 91-78 




Holy Cross 


w 


97-60 


Syracuse 


L 73-88 




Louisville 


w 


81-67 


Providence 


L 75-76 




UConn 


L 


62-63 


W. Virginia 


W 84-63 




Pittsburgh 


w 


55-53 


Miami 


W 62-58 




UMass Amherst 


L 


57-65 


Georgetown 


L 63-66 




Maryland-BC 


W 


78-56 


Providence 


W 70-68 




Hartford 


W 


106-67 


W. Virginia 


L 89-108 




Long Island 


W 


116-81 


Georgetown 


L 64-67 




Vanderbuilt 


W 


90-74 


Villanova 


L 71-76 




Rutgers 


W 


95-67 


Rutgers 


W 73-72 




Villanova 


L 


77-94 


Big East Tourn. 






Notre Dame 


W 


72-57 


vs. Pitt 


W 70-66 




Seton Hall 


W 


83-80 


vs. Syracuse 


L 61-69 



Men's Basketball 223 



Coached by Cathy Inglese, this year' s Women' s 
Basketball team surpassed all the odds and expectations 
which were set for them. Although the team was 
unusually young, consisting of five freshman, three 
sophomores, two juniors, and five seniors, they 
successfully ended up on top. Inglese was pleased 
with their improvement and growth, and believed 
their winning season could be attributed to hardwork, 
determination, and unity. Within the season, these 
fifteen dedicated athletes came together and worked 
as a whole, they "gelled very well, this team was a 
great mixture of young kids." 

The women began their season by hosting the 
first annual Reebok Women's Basketball Classic, 
making them the first collegiate team to play in the 
new Fleet Center, where they broke records for the 
number of spectators at a women's basketball team. 
They precedent of packing in the people was then 
continued during the regular season. 

Lead by seniors Teri McCormick, Cecillee 
Campbell, and junior Holly Porter, the season ended 
with an increase in wins due to successfully keeping 
turnovers down, and increasing the amount of points 
scored. This season they averaged 65 points a game, 
and against West Virginia they came out winning with 
82 points, an all time high for the team. This season 
also marked the Lady Eagles highest ever field-goal 
shooting percentage in a Big East game with a 56.3% 
accuracy. 

Porter, the leading scorer and rebounder, was 
the key player this season. Her exceptional talent was 
showcased by her ranking of 28 th among the NCAA 
Div. I in scoring. Porter also hit the 1,000 point and 
500 rebound mark this season, once again establishing 
herself among BC's elite athletes. Campbell, the 
starting center, is second in team scoring and 
rebounding, averaging 30.2 minutes per game. 
Freshman Amanda West was also a powerhouse for 
the team. West reached the fifth-best single-season 
performance in long-range field goals, an 
accomplishment never before attained by a freshman. 
Her performance earned her the honor of being the 
only rookie to rank in the Big East's three-point 
shooters; she ranked sixth at the end of the regular 
season. 

-Jen Collett 



...This team is a great mixture of young 
kids... " - Coach Inglese 




224 Women's Basketball 




Dan Shomaker 



Bk-Ft/L-R: Asst. Coach Cherly Aaron, Asst. Coach Sue Johnson, 
Kim Beezer, Aimee McGuire, Kinzer Cohen, Allison Booth, 
Whitney Steele, Paula Bacso, Amy O'Brien, Mng. Alan Rosero, 
Strength Coach Lee Anthony Glass, Asst. Coach Kerry Curran, 
Audrey Bowersox, Jennifer Passonno, Angela Crowder, Holly 
Porter, Head Coach Cathy Inglese, Teri McCormick, Cecilee 
Campbell, Toya Squair, Amanda West 

Women's Basketball 225 



Right: Sophomore Kinzer 
Cohen reaches up to pass 
above her opponents. 

Bottom Left: Aimee 
McGuire cuts in to the 
hoop despite the efforts 
of the opponent's 
defense. 

Bottom Right: The effort 
to block this shot is 
written all over these 
players' faces. 




226 Women's Basketball 




Left: Allison Booth launches a free throw. 

Bottom Left: Junior Toya Squair shows why she made the move up to 
starting point guard for the Lady Eagles. 

Below: Kinzer Cohen reaches way back to gain control of the ball. 






S c o 


r e 


boa 


Dan Shomaker 

r d 




Overall Record 






Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 




Reebok Classic 




Villanova 


L 64-74 




vs. Ohio State 


L 40-62 


Pittsburgh 


L 69-72 




Holy Cross 


W 65-57 


Miami 


L 59-60 




W. Virginia 


W 75-65 


Providence 


L 56-63 




St. John's 


W 76-61 


Syracuse 


W 74-63 




Colgate 


W 77-49 


UConn 


L 65-87 




Dartmouth 


W 65-44 


Seton Hall 


L 57-63 




New Hampshire 


L 64-67 


Rutgers 


W 59-50 




Harvard 


L 50-79 


Providence 


L 56-83 




Lady Gator Classic 




Villanova 


L 63-72 




vs. George Wash. 


L 67-70 


Georgetown 


L 53-68 




vs. UMass 


L 63-73 


St. John's 


W 




Rutgers 


L 63-79 


Big East Tourn. 


N/A 




Notre Dame 


L 51-80 








Georgetown 


W 70-64 








W. Virginia 


W 82-77 







Women's Basketball 227 




Laura Kerenyi 



"Our hope for this year is to dominate the 
division. " - John Peltonen 



~W 



c§ J% 







Bottom: The men's and women's team pose for a picture before a match. 
Below: Hadj Matsukata stands ready to face his opponent. 



The fencing team has come along way since 
first becoming a varsity sport six years ago. Their first 
year, they finished last in the New England 
Championships. However, under the guidance of 
Coach Syd Fadner both the men and women have 
made huge strides. Fadner has brought an emphasis on 
skills and speed training, rather than on straight power 
moves. Judging from the results, her approach seems 
to be right in target. 

Last year, the men' s team won the New England 
Championships. With seven seniors, the men had the 
manpower to repeat their performance and bring home 
the first again this year. Senior Keun Ok lead the men 
with a 72% varsity win record and a 74% league win 
record. Ok was also a serious contender for the advance 
to the NCAA Nationals. 

The women's team also did very well this 
season. After placing sixth in the New England's, they 
looked to the NCAA Regionals. Last year, they were 
first alternate at the NCAA Regionals. This year "Our 
hope for this year is to dominate the division," stated 
team Co-Capt. John Peltonen. With the help of team 
leader in the foil, Leah Larson, this goal was a real 
possibility. Commented Co-Capt. Mike Waring, "two 
years ago we qualified one person for the NCAA 
Regionals. Last year, six qualified." This year an 
outstanding fifteen fencers qualified for the regionals. 
As qualification for the NCAA' s is based on individual 
records, the fact that half of the team qualified speaks 
wonders for how far they really have come. 






















S c o 


r e 


boa 


r c 


Men'; 


5 Overall Record ( 8-12 ) 






Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 




Army 


W 15-12 


Yeshiva 


W 17-10 i 




Vassar 


W 21-6 


Columbia 


L 5-22 j| 




Johns Hopkins 


L 9-18 


Rutgers 


L 3-24 




Brandeis 


L 9-18 


Penn State 


L 1-26 




St. John's 


L 3-24 


Brown 


W 14-13 




Brown 


L 11-16 


UMass Amherst 


W 17-10 




MIT 


L 10-17 


BU 


W 17-10 




BU 


W 16-11 


Tufts 


W 14-13 I 




UNH 


L 13-14 


New Eng. Champ. 


N/A 




Dartmouth 


L 13-14 


NCAA Regionals 


N/A 




Brandeis 


L 11-16 


Eastern Champ. 


N/A 




MIT 


L 9-18 


NCAA Champ. 


N/A 



228 Fencing 




rop: Doug Duffin and his opponent compete heavily in their saber 

natch. 

Uiove: Michelle Yep lunges at her opponent. 

Vbove Right: Doug Duffin shakes hands with his opponent after the 

natch. 



..... 








S c o 


r e 


boa 


r d 


Women's Overall Record ( 8-12 ) 




Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 




Army 


W 23-9 


Northwestern 


L 12-20 




Vassar 


W16-16* 


Notre Dame 


L 4-28 




Johns Hopkins 


L 15-17 


UMass Amherst 


W 23-9 




Brandeis 


L 13-19 


BU 


W 21-11 




St. John's 


L 7-25 


UNH 


W 28-4 




Brown 


L 13-19 


Tufts 


L 8-8* 




MIT 


L 14-18 


Brown 


L 14-18 




Wellesley 


L 14-18 


Hunter 


N/A 




BU 


W 23-9 


Bard 


N/A 




Dartmouth 


W 27-5 


New Eng. Champ. 


N/A 




Bates 


W 26-6 


NIWFA Champ. 


N/A 




MIT 


L 15-17 


NCAA Regionals 


N/A 




Cornell 


L 15-17 


NCAA Champ. 


N/A 



Fencing 229 



Beyond The Expectations 



Senior wrestlers such as Co-Capt. Alex 
Tsianatecs and Mike Colleran knew just how far BC 
has come since their freshmen year. Colleran stated 
that the "team has made huge improvements over the 
past four years". He also added, "the competition has 
gotten tougher but we've gotten better and better." 

These improvements could not have been 
possible without all the teamwork that went into them. 
Tsianatecs believed that "because we practiced eleven 
times a week for six months, our team got pretty 
close." The team did lifting workouts on Monday, 
Wednesday, and Saturday mornings, and practiced 
every afternoon, except Saturdays. Furthermore, they 
spent most of the weekends together in tournaments. 

About coach, Rod Buttry, Colleran commented 
that "he is considered by elite wrestlers as one of the 
best coaches," and that "he knows wrestling backwards 
and forwards." Buttry, on his end, was very satisfied 
with how the team turned out this year. In his ninth 
year of coaching at BC, he knew exactly how 
competitive the schedule, in a new East Coast Assoc, 
was. His only goal was that "they work toward [their] 
motto, 'What I'm Going To Be I Am Now Becoming'." 

It seems that' s exactly what the players strived 
for. The season started off with placements in both of 
the first two tournaments. Senior Mike Odiotti 
especially stood out, placing second in the East 
Stroudsburg Tournament. 

As the only Division I team in its conference 
without scholarships, BC is working hard to be one of 
the best. As Tsianatecs stated, "Walk tall or better not 
walk at all." -Heidi Lee 



'What I'm Going To Be I Am Now Becoming 
-Team Motto 



Top: A few pointers are always appreciated by the wrestlers. 
Middle: The beginning of a match can be a critical lime to move to an 
offensive position. 

Bottom: Although the opposing teammember seems to have the 
advantage, with the right leverage move, he could end up on his back. 




S c o r 


e 


boa 


r d 


Overall Record (2-9 ) 




Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 


Cent. Conn. Tour. 


NTS* 


Bridgewater 


W 31-21 


E. Strousburgh Tour. 


NTS* 


Wilkes 


L 6-46 


Coast Guard Tour. 


NTS* 


Plymouth St. 


4 th of 8 


E. Invit. Tour. 


NTS* 


BU 


L 4-29 


Sunshine Tour. 


NTS* 


Cent. Conn. 


L 6-40 


Millersville Tour. 


NTS* 


UMass Lowell 


L 7-34 


Harvard 


L 9-39 


Buffalo 


L 6-34 


Army 


L 3-36 


ECWA Tour. 


N/A 


Wagner 


W 22-19 










*No Team Scoring 



230 Wrestling 




Elena K. Vizvary 




Courtesy of the Rughy Te^m 



'"op: The Lady Eagles rush to defend their player who carries the ball. 
Middle: The men gathered for a team shot after another win. 
;*ottom: The throw in of the ball is awaited during a women's game. 
U Right: The women's team gathers for an informal team picture. 



The Power To Win 

The Rugby teams at Boston College fall under 
Club Sports rather than Varsity. To the dedicated men 
and women who made the 1 995 season so exceptional, 
this was simply a title. They played as hard and 
enjoyed as much success as every other team out there. 

The Men's Rugby team had an outstanding 
season, only losing two games. According to senior 
Greg Guarneri, "Youth conquers all - they are truly 
tremendous players." Guarneri's statement refers to 
the fact that this was a very young team, mostly 
consisting of sophmores and juniors. Guarneri added, 
"Those underclassmen are gaining experience... By 
their senior year, they will be able to contend for a 
national title." With this vote of confidence on their 
side, the men are anxiously awaiting next season. 

The Women's Rugby team, with 1994 All 
American Jennifer Belafiore, also had an outstanding 
season. Two of their biggest accomplishments were 
the defeats of UConn 23-0 and Dartmouth 5-3. Coach 
Ken Daly believed they had a chance to go to Nationals 
as "the team is well balanced, and has a desire to win." 
Unfortunately, this was not possible due to the loss to 
Yale in the semi-finals of the New England 
Championships. Despite this disappointment, the 
women's rugby team was happy with the season, and 
are looking forward to 1996. -Mistie Psaledas 



" Youth conquers all - they are truly tremendous 



players. 



-Greg Guarneri 




Rugby 231 



Coming off last year's winning season, Coach 
Tom Groden relied on individual talent and team spirit 
to cruise through this season. The young Swimming 
Team with twenty-one returning sophomores got off 
to just that super start. The Eagles started swimming 
up to their potential and proved they can be a challenge. 
Although not a single record was broken during last 
year's season, freshman swimmer Sarah Guerena has 
changed that. In her first five meets at Boston College, 
she has broken three school records, including taking 
sixteen seconds of the 1000 meter freestyle. Guerena 
also qualified for the NCAA tournament, becoming 
the first BC swimmer since 198? to qualify. 

Coach Groden was impressed with this year's 
team, and anticipated one of his better seasons in a few 
years. He said the team was exceptional and "the 
performance and attitude is the best it' s been in five to 
six years." All of the freshman fit in well, and 
contributed their part, and the upperclassmen pulled 
together as a team. 

The Lady Eagles especially have brought 
themselves to new heights this year, under the 
leadership of Co-Captains Megan Lammon and Amy 
Dunleavey . Freshman Patty Schoenhaus broke a record 
for the 200m backstroke with a time of 2:08.34. 

The New England Championships are always 
a test for the lady swimmers, and this year they pulled 
through without a scar. Finishing third overall, the 
team broke three more school records, including a 
relay record that had been set in 1986. Coming off last 
year's season where they did not win an event in the 
meet, this year the team showed its expertise and came 
out on top in five events. The New Englands also came 
as the fourth of a nine meet winning streak for the Lady 
Eagles. 



.cont. pg. 234 




"...the performance and attitude is the best it's 
been in five to six years! " - Coach Groden 



I Swimming and Diving 













Marc SamaJ 


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liop: As one women's diver falls through the air, another prepares 
j for her next dive off the board. 

Ifottom: The BC men pull ahead of the opposing swimmers. 



This Page 



m 




Elena K. Vizvary 



Top: A Lady Eagle begins to inch ahead of her competition during one 
of the relays. 

Bottom Left: The Women's Diving Team poses for a team shot. 

Bottom Right: Swimmers on both sides prepare for their legs of a team 
relay. 



Swimming and Diving 233 



...cont. from pg. 232 

The men's team did not have the exceptional 
season which the women had. However, the men also 
lacked the strong experience the women had. Last year 
the men graduated four of the best swimmers in BC 
history. In order to recover from that loss, they 
necessarily had to concentrate on rebuilding this year. 
The team was primarily composed of underclassmen. 
While this made for a tough season this year, it also 
means a stronger team with more depth not only for 
next year but for the next few years. The talent 
certainly was in place this year to make the future look 
bright. As a case in pont, nine of the top twelve men's 
swimmers were freshman. 

Many changes have taken place in the diving 
division of Boston College Athletics. Joe Chirico, the 
former diving coach for Northeastern, has recently 
become a member of the Boston College community. 
He intends to make a great impact on the team. Last 
year, the team consisted of zero men and only one or 
two women. This year, the numbers have changed 
dramatically to two men and seven women. The talent 
and spirit which have appeared made Coach Chirico 
much happier than he anticipated. He raved, "the 
divers are performing better and improving on a weekly 
basis." They were a team entirely made up of freshmen 
working together this season, whereas before only a 
few individuals dominated. Athletes like Mary Beth 
Weston and Melissa McNamara, along with B J Coakley 
and Jon Shapiro were just a few of the oustanding 
contributors to this team. "This group marks a very 
good foundation for the years to come... the talent's up 
at the point where we can challenge new teams across 
the country," boasts Chirico. Among the many meets 
the divers participated in, the results of the Northeastern 
face-off looked especially promising. Though early in 
the season, the Eagles went up against the best team in 
the region. They dove great, making it a close turn-out 
even though it was one for the loss column. Chirico is 
excited over the promise of the future where the team 
will be on their way to being recognized on a national 
level. 



Cathleen O' Malley and Beverly Mather 



...the talent s up at the point where we can 
challenge new teams across the country. " 

- Coach Chirico 



Below: BC men's diver concentrates before he leaps off the board. 





o 



o 



Men's Overall Record (2-8) 



Opponent Score 



Opponent Score 



Notre Dame 

Seton Hall 

Providence 

Miami 

UNH 

New England 

Champ. 

Springfield 

Rhode Island 



L 64-234 
L 113.5-180.5 
L 114-179 
L 88-205 
L 128-172 
7th of 9 

W 188-104 
L 124-175 



Cent. Conn. 

Maine 

BU 

UConn 

Big East Champ. 

NCAA Zone 

Diving Meet 
NCAA Champ. 



133.5-126.5: 
162-136^ 
91-1501 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 

N/A 



Swimming and Diving 







d 






•WtjN<|M'«^M|m|| 





Marc Samale 



Top: The Men are ready for the gunshot. 

Jottom Left: One women's diver executes a back tuck, while the next 
competitor awaits her signal. 

Sottom Right: Coach Joe Chirico poses with two of his divers. 



5 c o 


r e 


b o 


arc 


Women's Overall Record (11-2) 


Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 


Notre Dame 


L 104-196 


Springfield 


W 169-129 


N. Michigan 


W 154-146 


Rhode Island 


W 207-93 


Seton Hall 


W 189-109 


BU 


W 184-116 


Providence 


W 189-111 


Maine 


W 169-129 


Miami 


L 138-161 


UMass Amherst 


W 190-110 


Northeastern 


W 169-129 


UConn 


N/A 


Army 


W 179-120 


Big East Champ. 


N/A 


UNH 


W 187-113 


NCAA Zone Diving N/A 


New England 


3rd of 9 


Meet 




Champ. 




NCAAA Champ. 


N/A 



Swimming and Diving 235 



The Comeback Kids 



BC Hockey Coach Jerry York began the 1995-1 996 
season with newfound fire in his eyes. With the 
stability and reputation returning back to the program, 
he was ready to win. In the early stages of the season, 
York said that he "noticed marked improvement and 
is extremely excited about the future". 

The team brought in December with a three game 
winning streak against St.Lawrence, Harvard, and 
UMASS Lowell - all impressive teams. The Eagles 
followed this accomplishment by ending January with 
a five game winning streak, including a 6-2 trouncing 
of UMaine in Conte Forum. BC went on to the always 
exciting Beanpot to play an old-fashioned rough-and- 
tumble game against BU. Although the Eagles 
proceeded to the Consolation round, many watching 
the first round felt like they were watching a 
professional game rather than a college one due to the 
speed and physical nature of the game. 

Captain Dave Hymovitz has led his class in scoring 
for the past three years and continued to do so this 
season. Captain Don Chase was also a potent offensive 
weapon. It earned him the 1993-1994 John A.Kelley 
Award as the player who best typifies Boston College 
Hockey. "Together," said York, "the two have proven 
to be leaders on and off the ice." 

Tom Ashe, a solid two-way player, will forever be 
remembered for his game winning overtime goal in a 
Beanpot Championship against Harvard. Junior 
goaltender, Greg Taylor, finished last season fourth on 
the B C career save list with 1915 stops, and was named 
the number one goal-tender on the College Sports Ice 
Dream Team. This season Taylor had an 89% save rate 
overall. Yet, the future of BC hockey lies with freshman 
Marty Reasoner, who led the team in assists. Reasoner 
and Hymovitz were both Ail-American candidates for 
this season. 

So, with such a promising future, what did York 
plan to focus on the most? "I want to improve all facts 
of our game and upgrade our recriuting. But, most 
importantly, I want to solidify BC hockey and restore 
its historic high standard of excellence." Well, Jerry, 
it looks like you're on your way. 



-Aimee Desrosiers 



'.../ want to solidify BC hockey and restore 
its historic high standard of excellence... " 

- Coach York 












236 Men's Hockey 



Shawn T. Me 

Top : Junior goalie Greg Taylor makes an oustanding glove save again:' 
the opposing team. 

Above: Junior David Wainwright clears the puck out of Boston 
College territory. 




Shawn T. Mead 



|'op Right: Freshman Andy Powers attacks his opponent with an 

'ggresive stick check. 

iottom Right: Senior co-captain Don Chase squeezes one by Maine 

•oalie. 

Vbove: BC defends its goal successfully. 



Men's Hockey 237 




Shawn T. Mead 





"■SI -cf^ 



O- 



Top: Senior forward Don Chase scores over the futile attempts of the 

opposing goalie. 
Bottom Left: Junior goalie Greg Taylor goes for the save. 
Bottom Right: All Hockey East player David Hymovitz brings the puck 

around the back of the net with the opposing defense in hot pursuit. 



238 Men's Hockey 








Top Right: The Eagles celebrate 
after another goal. 

At Left: Callahan makes a pass 
to BC All-Timer Hymovitz. 



Men's Hockey 239 



■ 






I ^^ 



r^»N^ 



— vl 








Shawn T. Mea-. 




240 Men's Hockey 




Opposite Page - 

Top: Hockey East Rookie of the Year Marty Reasoner scores in the 

home blowout over UMass. 
Bottom: The tough BC offense takes the action in much to close for the 

BU goalie's comfort. 
This Page - 

Left: Forward Toby Harris takes the puck to the other side of the rink. 
Below: Senior David Hymovitz shoots past the UMass defense. 
Bottom Center: The team forms its pre-game huddle in preparation for 

another win. 








Shawn T. Mead 



Scoreboard 



Shawn T. Mead 




Overall Record (16-17-3) 

Opponent Score Opponent 



Score 



Tournament 

vs. Michigan St. L 2-5 

vs. Miami L 1-7 

Notre Dame W 7-5 

Providence T 3-3 

Providence L 3-4 

Northeastern W 5-4 

Northeastern L 2-5 

Maine L 0-5 

Maine L 0-4 

Clarkson L 2-4 

St. Lawrence W 10-4 

Harvard W 2-1 

UMass Lowell W 6-5 

UMass Lowell L 3-8 

UNH W 5-4 

UNH L 2-3 
US Air Tourn. 

vs. Dartmouth L 1-3 

vs. Vermont T 1-1 

Merrimack W 7-5 

UMass Lowell L 4-6 



BU 

BU 

UMass Amherst 

UMass Amherst 

Merrimack 

Merrimack 

Maine 

Beanpot 

vs. BU 
Providence 
Beanpot 

vs. Harvard 
Northeastern 
UNH 
UMass 
BU 
Hockey East 

Quarterfinals 
vs. Providence 
vs. Providence 



T 
L 
W 
W 

w 
w 
w 

L 
L 

W 

W 

L 

W 

W 



L 

L 



4-4 

3-10 
8-2 
5-3 
5-3 
4-2 
6-2 

1-4 
1-4 

6-2 
3-2 
0-10 
7-3 
3-1 



2-5 
2-4 



Men's Hockey 241 



Making A Mark In Division I 



Being successful was not enough for the 
Women's Hockey team; they were determined to be 
the best. In their second year of Division I competition, 
they were intent on making the national playoffs for 
the first time. Senior Co-Capt. Kristen Gray said, 
"This was the first year I've been here when losing 
close wasn't going to be good enough. We were going 
into every game with the chance to win." 

This team was a good mix of experience and 
youth, with about half of the team made up of 
upperclassmen and the other half consisting of what 
Coach O'Malley called "the best freshman class in the 
country." Most of the newcomers came from top level 
prep, programs, five are former captains, and three 
took places in the national development camp for 
Olympic team invitees before coming to college. With 
upperclassmen like Gray and fellow senior Co-Capt. 
Tobin Dominic to follow, these young skaters should 
develop into outstanding players. 

Although the Lady Eagles played with only 17 
players, what they didn't have in numbers, the made 
up for in heart. Gray said, "Of my four years here, this 
was the best feeling I've had about people's attitudes 
regarding wanting to be here and what it will take to 
win." O'Malley was also optimistic about the current 
team, describing them as a "solid team that always 
gives their all and has a great attitude". 

With the motivation and talent of this year's 
team, as well as a successful recruiting program, 
women's ice hockey will be exciting and competitive 
for many years to come. O'Malley stated, "This 
program is the team of the future in college women's 
hockey. BC is academically an outstanding school, 
and the women's hockey program is definitely on the 
way to the top." - Jennifer Jagodnik 



"This program is the team of the future in college 
women 's hockey. " -Coach O 'Malley 





ill 



UOLD 




Opposite Page - 

Bottom: Erin Magcc takes the puck in towards the net. 

At Left: High sticking by the opponents doesn't stop our Lady Eagles. 

This page - 

Bottom Left: Freshman Caroline Miller knocks over the goalie and 

scores for BC. 
Below: Carroll McCaffrey passes around her oncoming opponent. 




DajiShomaker 















S c o 


r e 


boa 


r d 




Overall Record (4-8-2) 






Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 




Providence 


L 2-8 


Middlebury 


W 5-2 




Colby 


L 2-3 


Wesleyan 


W 10-2 




New Hampshire 


L 2-7 


Northeastern 


L 1-4 




Dartmouth 


L 5-6 


Harvard 


L 1-3 




Brown 


L 1-7 


St. Lawrence 


W 4-3 




Bowdoin 


W 7-1 


Cornell 


L 1-3 




Middlebury 


W 4-3 


Beanpot Champ. 


L 3-4 




Yale 


T 2-2 


Brown 


L 2-3 




Cornell 


L 3-5 


Providence 


L 0-5 




St. Lawrence 


W 10-5 


Bowdoin 


N/A 




Colby 


L 2-7 


Princeton 


N/A 




Harvard 


L 4-6 


Yale 


N/A 




Northeastern 


T 4-4 


ECAC Qualifier 


N/A 




RPI 


W 14-1 


ECAC Semifinals 


N/A 




Dartmouth 


L 3-5 







Women's Hockey 243 



A Diamond in the Rough 

Coach Maloney feels that there were a "lot of 
lessons to be learned" from the 1995 Baseball season. 
The first being to "get off to a better start." The season 
began with a lot of injures, a record of 2 and 12, and a lot 
to learn. However, Maloney was very impressed with the 
players and their attitude. "They didn't give up. We 
bounced back and we played very well towards the end 
of the year." 

By the begining of May, the team had a record of 
19 and 22. The season came down to the last four games. 
Had they been able to win those four, the season would 
have ended with a winning record. Unfortunately, that 
did not happen. They played well, but could only win two 
I out of the four games. However, the season still ended 
with a record of 21-24-0, much better than the previous 
year. 

The season, while not perfect, was filled with 
many highlights. Coach Maloney has vivid memories of 
the last game of their winning streak against St. John's. 
Curt Romboli pitched for 10 innings for a final score of 
2 and 1. The year ended with Romboli and Brian Sanky 
being named All Big East. Kevin Penwell was named All 
North East and led the Big East in hitting. Romboli was 
also drafted by the Boston Red Sox. 

Although the '95 season was improved over '94, 
the team has a way to go. Coach Maloney summed it up 
best when he said "To me, the highlights are not over yet. 
The learning process of what we did last year, the ups and 
the downs, I want to carry into this year. Maybe this year 
will be the highlight of what happened last year." With a 
little work and a lot of heart maybe this year will end up 
being that highlight. 

- Laura Kerenyi 



To me, the highlights are not over yet. " 

- Coach Maloney 




* **: !? 





The 1995 Men's Baseball Team 



Top: A BC player makes a hit. 

Above: #5 stays alert as the opponent tries to steal a base. 



Baseball 




Below: BC outfielders watch as the ball is hit towards them. 
Bottom: Marc Bettencourt throws another strike. 





S c o 


r 


e 


boa 


r 


d 


Overall Record 21-24-0 






Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 


North Dakota State 


L 


1-2 


Georgetown 


w 


5-1 


1 Missouri - St. Louis 


L 


5-10 


Brown 


w 


19-1 


Southern Illinois 


W 


2-1 


St. John's 


w 


2-1 


Winona State 


L 


9-10 


St. John's 


L 


2-3 


Hofstra 


L 


6-5 


St. John's 


L 


2-5 


1 Pittsburgh 


L 


3-13 


Harvard 


W 


12-3 


1 LaSalle 


W 


11-0 


Northeastern 


L 


3-7 


[ Fairleigh Dickinson 


L 


3-9 


Villanova 


L 


2-3 


Hofstra 


L 


11-7 


Villanova 


L 


9-12 


Rhode Island 


L 


5-6 


Villanova 


L 


6-7 


Providence 


L 


0-8 


Tufts 


L 


7-9 


Providence 


L 


3-4 


Northeastern 


W 


13-10 


j Providence 


L 


5-15 


Brandeis 


W 


5-3 


] Massachusetts 


L 


6-12 


Seton Hall 


L 


0-5 


Hartford 


W 


9-7 


Seton Hall 


W 


2-1 


Bentley 


W 


5-4 


Seton Hall 


L 


0-11 


Connecticut 


W 


11-9 


Holy Cross 


W 


8-3 


Connecticut 


W 


10-5 


Harvard 


W 


7-5 


Connecticut 


W 


7-6 


New Hampshire 


w 


6-5 


| Boston University 


W 


11-2 


Pittsburgh 


w 


13-2 


j Boston University 


W 


10-0 


Pittsburgh 


L 


3-4 


I Georgetown 


L 


4-5 


Pittsburgh 


L 


12-15 


! Georgetown 


W 


5-2 









Baseball 245 



Reaching For Goals 



The Men's Lacrosse team began their 1995 
season with a goal. The goal was to be able to compete 
with other men' s lacrosse teams in the top twenty-five, 
with the hope of breaking into the top twenty-five 
ranking. The team set off to achieve this goal through 
hard practices and team building. 

The high point of the men' s season was making 
it to the ECAC finals. This game, against Yale, was the 
toughest of the season. Boston College came back 
from one goal behind, with thirty seconds left in the 
final quarter, to tie up the game. Although BC lost in 
overtime by one, they were pleased to have played so 
well against a top team. 

Overall, the season went well. They had a 
number of nail-biters against top twenty-five teams. In 
addition to playing well against Yale, BC was 
competitive against Holbart (another top twenty-five 
team). Furthermore, the team developed their playing 
skills considerably throughout the season. The defense 
especially should be commended as there were many 
injuries and several defense players graduated the year 
before. 

During the fall season, the new freshman 
impressed the upperclassmen on the team with their 
ball skills, speed, and stick work. Since there were 
only a few graduating seniors last year, the outlook for 
the '96 season could not be better. 

- Mark Sekula 








"The goal... breaking into the top twenty- 
five ranking. " -Mark Sekula 




Shawn T. Mead 



246 Men's Lacrosse 





Left: BC player hunts down his opponent. 

Opposite Page - Bottom Left: The defense springs into action and blocks 
the goal. Bottom Right: An Eagle watches for the pass. 

This Page - Bottom Left: Sprinting neck and neck with his oppnent, BC 
team member watches the play closely. Below: A check disrupts the Boston 
College breakaway. 




Shawn T- Mead 















S c o 


r e 


boa 


r d 


Overall Record (5-10-0) 






Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 




Brown 


L 9-19 


Vermont 


L 5-n 




Harvard 


L 10-20 


Providence 


W 18-11 




Cal-Berkley 


W 17-9 


Hartford 


W 18-7 




Massachsetts 


L 4-13 


Rutgers 


L 6-10 




Holy Cross 


W 13-2 


Heet Lax Invit. 


L 8-10 




Georgetown 


L 5-23 


vs.Hobart 






New Hampshire 


W 15-14 


ECAC Div. I Tourn. 


W 14-13 




Michigan State 


L 8-13 


vs. Canisius 


L 14-17 




Yale 


L 11-12 


vs. Colgate 





Men's Lacrosse 247 



MAKING A PITCH FOR 
THE BIG EAST TITLE 

With a record of 26-16, and a second place 
finish in the Big East, last year's softball season was a 
resounding success ! The season' s successes culminated 
with a third place finish in the Big East tournament. 
Moreover, there were several individual achievements 
as well. Kelly Cross, returning this year to play first 
base and as Co-Captain, led the team with a .347 
batting average (.333 in the Big East). Deb Mastika 
made First Team All-Conference for the infield, and 
Alexis Beckman was a pitcher on the All-Conference 
Second Team. 

The two starters who graduated last year have 
achieved success off the field as well. Julie Veras, is 
in training for physical therapy at the University of 
Nebraska, and Sue Corwin is consulting with a major 
financial firm. 

With most of the team returning and an almost 
entirely new set of coaches, led by former Providence 
Head Coach Jennifer Finley, the '96 team is having 
fun and excited about playing again. Said Beckman, 
"The new coaches have brought a lot more enthusiasm 
back into the game for all of us. They bring the 
knowledge and coaching ability with them that' s going 
to improve all of us as players." 

BC is expected to finish 5th in the newly 
expanded Big East, but the team believes they have the 
ability and the desire to surprise everyone. Cross 
stated, "The main goal for '96 is definitely to win the 
Big East and to go on to the NCIIA championships... 
The new coaching has brought a greater appreciation 
for the game... It has done this team a world of good." 
Outdoing '95 will be quite a challenge, but with their 
combination of talent and enthusiasm, they have a 
great chance! - Jennifer Jagodnik 



"The main goal for '96 is... to win the Big East and to go 
on to the NCIIA championships..." - Kelly Cross 



AAA 



r^s*»i??jnr^tft"i 



Oi 



VI 



WAV 




Bk-Ft/L-R: A.Coach Kelli Weaver, Mng. Jen Sheehan, Stacy 
Ambrose, Karen Emma, Laura Thompson, Rachel Peterson, Crista 
Corpening, Melissa Maikos, Lindsay Migliero, Kelly Houchin, 
A.Coach Steffany Bender, H.Coach Nancy McGuire, Deb Nasitka, 
Julie Obear, Diane Croff, Kelly Cross, Sue Corwin, Liz Walker, 
Marcie Cornell, Kate Giardi, Alexis Beckman 



Top: BC women know the play is not over just because the ball reaches t j! 
outfield. 

| 
Bottom : Number eight swings away. 





op Left: A good eye and a powerful swing add up to a base hit every 
ne. 

op Right: Kelly Cross starts to jog after hitting the ball out of the 
sider's reach. 





Peter Mams 






Peter Manis 








S c o 


r 


e 


boa 


r 


d 




Overall Record 29-23-0 








Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 




Evansville 


L 


1-2 


Boston University 


L 


0-3 




Holy Cross 


W 


10-3 


Providence 


W 


1-0 




St. Joseph's 


L 


1-3 


Providence 


W 


3-1 




Ferris State 


L 


2-3 


Hofstra 


W 


8-6 




La Salle 


L 


6-7 


Hofstra 


L 


0-2 




East Carolina 


L 


3-17 


Harvard 


W 


9-0 




Pennsylvania 


W 


6-3 


Harvard 


L 


5-6 




Holy Cross 


W 


9-0 


Villanova 


L 


2-6 




Holy Cross 


W 


4-3 


Villanova 


L 


1-5 




Yale 


L 


0-1 


St. John's 


W 


5-3 




Yale 


W 


10-1 


St. John's 


w 


8-2 




Maine 


L 


3-5 


Connecticut 


L 


0-3 




Maine 


W 


10-0 


Connecticut 


W 


7-1 




Connecticut 


W 


1-0 


Hartford 


L 


0-2 




Connecticut 


L 


0-1 


Hartford 


W 


5-0 


Providence 


L 


0-3 


Rhode Island 


w 


10-2 


Providence 


L 


0-8 


Rhode Island 


w 


4-0 




St John's 


W 


7-3 


Seton Hall 


w 


5-2 




St. John's 


W 


13-6 


Seton Hall 


L 


5-6 




Fairfield 


W 


9-1 


UMass-Amherst 


L 


0-1 




Fairfield 


W 


3-0 


UMass-Amherst 


L 


1-2 




Brown 


W 


2-1 


Big East Tourn. 


L 


0-5 




Brown 


W 


8-1 


vs. Providence 






Villanova 


W 


6-0 


Big East Tourn. 


W 


5-1 


Villanova 


W 


2-0 


vs. Villanova 






Seton Hall 


W 


6-5 


Big East Tourn. 


L 


1-5 


Seton Hall 


W 


4-0 


vs. Providence 








Boston University 


L 


0-2 









ottom: The baseman makes the play. 



Softball 249 



Growing Strength 



"Our 1 995 season was considered to be a re-building 
year," stated junior Kelley Mclntyre of the Women's 
Lacrosse team. She added, "it was one of our strongest 
freshmen years ever - seven out of twenty-two members 
were playing in their first season." 

Under Head Coach Sheren Granese and the strong 
efforts of juniors Tobin Dominick, Beth Signori, 
Mclntyre, and sophomore Megan McElvogue, the 
women ended their spring season with a record of 5- 
8. Although many of the team members were 
disappointed with that result, Mclntyre stated, "We 
are ready to turn the program around. We have a lot of 
talent which will be utilized in our next season." 

The '95 spring season was the last one under Coach 
Granese. The women are looking forward to the new 
guidance of Coach Maryanne Foley. Foley commented 
" The team is ready to grow into the program. Our hard 
work during the pre-season for 1 996 will help us to 
turn this program around into a highly successful 
one." 

Additionally, Mclntyre views the future coaching 
of Foley as a great asset. "She has a lot of energy, and 
the whole team can identify easily with her." The rest 
of the team agreed that despite the best efforts which 
were given by Coach Granese, Foley' s style of coaching 
will be better suited to this team. 

During their rebuilding year, despite their record of 
5-8, the team was very satisfied with many of their 
matches. Although Villanova was not considered an 
outstanding team, the girl' s felt like they "clicked" and 
all played well together. Additionally, the match 
against Dartmounth proved to be a team success, as 
well as their efforts against Yale, their biggest rival. 

Overall, the women's lacrosse team is looking 
forward to the benefits of a rebuilding year, a strong 
freshmen class, and new coaching under Foley. 

-Bev Mather and Mistie Psaledas 



'We are ready to turn the program around. ' 

- Kelley Mclntyre 



Top: Gaffney McGrath runs downl'ield in anticipation of a pass. 
Bottom: Doubleteaming by the BC defense ruins their opponent's plans. 






250 Women's Lacrosse 





Women's Lacrosse 251 




252 Seniors 





mw& 



Lara Farrell and Amy Snyder, Co-Editors 



As inexperienced freshman, the class of 1 996 
entered the gates of Boston College with 
high expectations of greatness. Throughout the 
past four years, we've celebrated good times 
with the best of friends and lent a hand through 
the rough ones. Senior year brought new 
experiences and the first glimpses of life beyond 
the Heights. Senior portraits, tickets for Senior 
week, resumes, interviews, and applications for 
graduate school added to the already hectic life of 
a soon-to-be graduate. The year was filled with 
many lasts- last football games, last parties, but 
most of all, memories that will last forever 



Photo Courtesy of John Comisky 




Seniors 253 



'There is nothing worth the 
wear of living but the 

laughter and love of friends. 

Hilaire Belloc 





Seniors 255 



// 



Good friends are hard to find, 
harder to keep 
and 
impossible to forget." 




Seniors 257 



258 



Class 






'A friend may well be 

reckoned the 

masterpiece of 

nature." 

Ralph Waldo Emerson 







-.,;. ;*w* ■ 






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Seniors 259 



''True happiness consists not 

in the multitude of friends, 

but in the worth and choice." 

Ben Johnson 





Seniors 261 



Life is to be fortified by many 
friendships. To love and to be loved 
is the greatest happiness of 

existence. 

Sidney Smith 




Seniors 263 



These are the times to remember, 
'cause they will not last forever. 

Billy Joel 




Seniors 265 



Faisal Abbasi 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance 



Michael J. Abbate 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Christie J. Abbiss 

School of Management 

Computer Science/ 
Marketing/Info. Systems 



Charles A. Abdella Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Rula Abdelrazek 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Karen E. Abele 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




David S. Abraham 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 





Lina Abirafeh 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Kelley M. Adams 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed./ Mod. Special 
Needs/ Early Childhood 




Scott D. Adams 

School of Management 
Marketing 

266 Class of '96 



Stephen M. Adams 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Thomas E. Adams 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Lussy D. Adikoesoemo 

School of Management 

Finance 
General Management 



Holly C. Adorno 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Samir Agarwal 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christina M. Ahlberg 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Economics 



Christian E. Albertson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kate Aldrich 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jai M. Alexander 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 





*A*k 





rshall P. Alexander 


Reagan B. Alexander 


Rehan H. Ali 


Nunzio N. Alioto 


Julie S. Allen 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


English 


Philosophy 
Psychology 


Finance 


Political Science 
English 




Michael C. Allen 


Caroline E. Allison 


Brooks D. Altshuler 


Marysol C. Alvarez 


Rachel E. Alves 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Accounting 


Human Development 


Political Science 


Marketing 


Elementary Education 


Finance 


Biology 




Finance 


Human Development 




Nicole M. Amadori 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Michele K. Amatangelo 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kim E. Ambrosini 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michael J. Anciello 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Alexander F. Anderson 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 267 





David S. Anderson 

School of Management 
Finance 



John M. Andrews 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Nuria Angles 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Communications 



Jeffrey J. Anthony 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Tessa S. Antoine 


Bryen S. Aoyama 


Monica C. Arango 


Maria T. Argimon 


Michele M. Armand 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Science 


Sociology 


Computer Science 


Finance 


Information Systems 


English 
Sociology 




Beth A. Armstrong 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 


Jennifer L. Armstrong 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 


Katharine J. Arnold 

School of Management 
Finance 


Mari Ines Arroyo 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 


John C. Ashe 

Arts & Sciences 
English 


268 Class of 96 











Amber Jean Atkinson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jennifer L. Atwood 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Michelle L. Aubin 

School of Management 

General Management 

English 



Francesca M. Auricchio 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Steven A. Aviles 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Hannah M. Ayer 

School of Management 

Marketing 

English 



Christine L. Ayotte 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Hideki Azuma 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Mathematics 



Kathryn A. Bach 

School of Management 
Finance 



Marissa E. Bachman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Allison L. Bacon 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Robyn J. Baker 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Dahlia Badawi 

Arts & Sciences 
French 




Stephen E. Baker 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Seniors 269 



"Tell me and Til 
for get... involve me and I'll 
understand. 

-Native American saying 





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Seniors 271 



Alphonse A. Bakhit 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Carmen S. Baksh 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Marc A. Bala 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer L. Baldwin 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Mary F. Bannerman 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Gina M. Barbieri 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Mauri A. Barlas 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Edward T. Barnaby 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Christopher E. Barnowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Stephen V. Barreca Jr, 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Physics 




Gabriel I. Barreneche 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



Michelle A. Barreto 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Andrew Bartkus 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Christina S. Bartning 

School of Management 
Economics 



Robert A. Bateh 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Francis R. Bates 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Marie R. Baudouin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Brian C. Baumann 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Biology 



Francisco Xavier Bay 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Jennifer G. Beach 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



272 Class of 96 



Sean M. Beagan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jonathan Beatty 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Brigitte M. Beaudoin 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



John Patrick Becher 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Katherine A Becker 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Matthew J. Beekman 

Arts & Science 
Physics 



Monica C. Belanger 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer L. Belfiore 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Alexander L. Belknap 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Joseph P. Belotti HI 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Seniors 273 



Jessica M. Bender 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 



Aimee G. Benedetto 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Helene K. Benedict 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Andrea E. Bennett 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Marci E. Bennison 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




James T. Bentley 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Jeffrey S. Berg 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 





Stephen P. Berasi 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Erin M. Bergin 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 




Sacha Beriro 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

274 Class of '96 



Peter R. Berlinghof 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jeannie Bermudez 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



Michelle Bernard 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 



Paul D. Bernardin 

School of Management 

Finance 
Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 




Julie C. Berns 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer J. Berryman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Michael V. Berryman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Christopher P. Bertoldo 

School of Management 
Finance 



Amelia C. Betancourt 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Christina M. Bethoney 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 
Communications 



Vincent M. Bettes 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lauren A. Bianchi 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Maria Bianco 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Catherine V. Bickford 

School of Management 
Human Resource Mamt. 




Jason A. Bieber 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Philosophy 



Kara S. Bieling 

School of Management 
Finance 
French 



Robert J. Bierwirth 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Nicole L. Bieryla 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Susan M. Biggs 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 




Carlisle Bindoo Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Eric D. Blanchard 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Patricia A. Blanchette 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Julian J. Blazewicz 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Seth M. Blee 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Seniors 275 







Keith D. Bloom 


Christian P. Bolanos 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Biology 


Finance 




Mathematics 




Laurel A. Bomely 

School of Management 

Finance 

Psychology 



Mm* 



Eric J. Bordenkircher 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Keith T. Borge 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Gabriel S. Borthwick 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 



Sinjita Lisa Bose 

School of Management 
Economics 
Marketing 



Jennifer L. Bosworth 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kendra A. Botelho 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Lynn A. Bottari 


Juan C. Bou 


Martin J. Boudreau 


Rafael Bouet 


Patricia E. Bourke 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Finance 


Finance 
Philosophy 


English 


Biology 


Early Childhood Educatioi 
Human Development 


Class of '96 











Stephen H. Bowen 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Katherine H. Bowie 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Catherine M. Bowler 

School of Management 
Finance 



Patricia A. Boyle 

School of Management 
Accounting 



John R. Boyt 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Maria J. Bozzotto 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Terrance Breen 

School of Management 
Finance 



Mary-Alice Brady 

Arts & Scences 
Political Science 



essica A. Brechtl 


Ian W. Breen 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Spanish 


Biology 



Mary E. Brennan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Nicholas A. Brady 

Arts & Science 
Political Science 



Ryan J. Brady 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Colleen M. Brandes 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 






Seniors 277 



278 



Still crazy after all 
these years" 

-Paul Simon 









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Seniors 279 





Michelle C. Brennan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Moira D. Brett 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kerri A. Brickley 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Special 

Needs/Human Dev. 



Craig L. Bridge 

School of Management 
Finance 




Dan M. Brillman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Conni S. Brinkman 

School of Management 
Finance 



Karen F. Brocklesby 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jennifer L. Brodeur 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Diane Lynn Bronowicz; 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Theater Arts 




Pamela C. Brooks 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 
Communications 

280 Class of 96 



Brian F. Brown 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kerri A. Brown 

School of Management 
Economics 



Amy C. Bruckner 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Carl A. Brugnoli 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christian S. Bruno 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Regan L. Buckley 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kenneth Brush 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 



Alison S. Bryan 

School of Management 
Accounting 



J. Andrew Bryceland 

School of Management 
Computer Science 



Nicole E. Buckley 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Early Childhood 

Child in Society 




David R. Budka 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Tho-"Tara"T. Bui 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Roy O. Bulleri 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jason M. Bunge 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Michael V. Buonaspina 

School of Management 

Economics 

Finance/Marketing 



Travis J. Buonocore 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



James D. Burchetta 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Courtney L. Burdick 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Susan J. Burgess 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Martin S. Burke 


Michael W. Burke 


Patricia Burke 


Ryan S. Burke 


Heather A. Burnap 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Secondary Education 


Psychology 


English 


Political Science 


French 


Mathematics 






Seniors 281 



Maria Isabelle R. Bustria 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Christina M. Butler 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Mark H. Butler 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 



Nicholas D. Butovich 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Bronson Byi 

School of Management 

Finance 
Marketing/Info. Systems 




Jahaneen Byramjee 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Joann Byrne 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Paul Jeffrey Byrne 

School of Management 

Finance 

Theatre Arts 



Keith A. Byron 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Anne Byun 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 





Christopher A. Cabalu 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Christina Cacioppo 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Brian M. Caddigan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer Caira 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed. /Mod. Special 

Needs/ Human Dev. 



Cristin H. Callaghan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Julie M. Callahan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

282 Class of '96 




Jennifer L. Calonita 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Don Luis A. Camacho 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Aleeca N. Campbell 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 



Brian Campbell 

Arts & Science 
English 



Cecilee M. Campbell 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Christopher J. Campbell 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Timothy F. Campbell 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Matthew J. CampoBasso 

Arts & Sciences 

Classical Civilization 

Economics 



Christine F. Cannon 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 





Judith Cantallops 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Management 




Anthony F. Caporrino 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Economics 



Michael S. Cappiello 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Michelle M. Cappon 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./ 

Mod. Special Needs 

Human Dev. 



Michael W. Cardamone 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Jennifer L. Carlberg 

School of Management 
Finance 



Elizabeth A. Carlstrom 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Seniors 283 



Chad M. Carlton 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Michelle H. Carpentieri 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Social Work Admin. 



Steven P. Carreiro 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Nick M. Carriello 

School of Management 
Finance 



Lisa Carrier 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Kimberly S. Carroll 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Sebastian M. Cartade 

School of Management 
Economics 
Marketing 





Robert J. Carroll 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Science 




Chayane P. Carter 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Communications 




Kerriann M. Carthy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Juan M. Casellas 

School of Management 
Economics 
Philosophy 



Matthew C. Casey 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Peter M. Casey 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Brian T. Cashin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



284 Class of 96 



Kara A. Cassesse 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Corine L. Casterline 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Bryan G. Castro 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Carol I. Castro 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Cari J. Caulway 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Christopher M. Cavallo 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Finance 



Damien J. Cave 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mark S. Cedorchuk 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Caroline A. Cerullo 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



James C. Cesarano 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Sunil Chadda 


Jaime E. Chamorro 


Do W. Chan 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


General Management 


Biology 



Yuen H. Chan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Chantala Chanthasiri 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 




Christi L. Chaplis 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Psychology 



Dawn L. Chapman 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Melanie J. Chapman 

School of Management 

Human Resource 

Management 



% 

Alexander J. 
Charalambides 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
History 



Justin D. Charest 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Seniors 285 




£1^ 




'There is so much more to see, why 
stay behind when you could go on 
with me? 

-Edie Brickell 




Seniors 287 




Vivian W. Chin 


Michael A. Chipman 


Elizabeth H. Chiriboga 


Dan J. Chivas 


David D. Cho 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Finance/Info. Systems 


Finance 


Biology 


Political Science 


Philosophy 


Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 










Jin-Hyung Cho 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

288 Class of '96 



Yongsang Cho 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Eric M. Chodkowski 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Political Science 




M*M 



David J. Choi 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Hyung-Tae E. Choi 

School of Management I 
Accounting 




Paul M. Christen 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jessica H. Chun 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Economics 



Edward K. Chung 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Soyon Chung 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Justin C. Chura 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Joseph A. Ciampa 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Marco A. Ciampa 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Kelley A. Ciampi 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Karyn E. Ciappa 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Alessandra M. Ciardello 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Christine M. Ciardi 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Cherilyn K. Cimeno 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Linda Marie Cinguina 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Management 



Thomas J. Cirino 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Marianne D. Civiletto 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 




Erin L. Clancy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Daniel J. Clark 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Justin P. Clark 

School of Management 
Finance 



Ryan G. Clark 

School of Management 

Operations & Strategic 

Management 



Kevin M. Clarke 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 289 



Christine L. Clavelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Darcie E. Coleman 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



Rachel A. Clough 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



David K. Clune 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Frank J. Colagiovanni 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Theodore M. Coleman 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Maureen P. Coley 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Anna L. Colletta 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Eric F. Colandrea 

School of Management 
Finance 




Brendan W. Collins Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscienct 




Michelle M. Colucci 


Melinda G. Comary 


James A. Comer 


John M. Comiskey 


David A. Condon 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Accounting 


Mathematics 


History 


Economics 


Finance 




Psychology 


Sociology 


Philosophy 


Military Science 




Devin C. Condron 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Dana M. Coniglio 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Gina M. Coniglio 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Matthew B. Conine 

School of Management 
Finance 



Catherine M. Connelrjl 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



290 Class of '96 



Patricia J. Connelly 

School of Education 
rly Childhood Education 
Human Development 



Danielle P. Connolly 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Melissa S. Conover 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael R. Consiglio 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 




Amy Cooper 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Economics 



i_ 

Catherine E. Copeland 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jl 

Jonathan D. Copper 

School of Management 
Finance 



Doug S. Cook 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Susan M. Cook 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Wendy Anne Cook 

School of Nursing 
Nursina 




Marci L. Cornell 

School of Management 
Finance 



Scott D. Cornick 

School of Management 
Finance 



Seniors 291 



: 



If we weren't all crazy we 
would go insane 1 /' 

Jimmy Buffett 




292 Class af '96 






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Seniors 293 






i trfi 



Diane M. Correia 


James A. Cosentino 


Mary Beth Cosgrove 


Kevin M. Costello 


Timothy A. Costello 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Psychology 


Finance 


Economics 
English 


History 


Accounting 
Finance 




AMI 



Chad D. Cote 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Matthew Coughlin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Sean J. Coughlin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Chris H. Couillard 


Holly M. Couture 


Karyn B. Coviello 


Colleen M. Cowhard 


Edward M. Cox 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Communications 


Biology 


Biology 


English 


Accounting 


294 Class of 96 











Christopher Coxen 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kimberly Dawn Cozza 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Lucy J. Craig 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Bradley J. Crane 

School of Management 
Finance 



John R. Craven 

Arts & Sciences 
History 





fc^ifc 




Kimberly C. Cressy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Timothy Creutz 

School of Management 
Economics 



Aaron W. Cringan 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Brian M. Criscuolo 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Brenda L. Croce 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Brian A. Cromwell 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Katharine S. Cronin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Scott T. Cronin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kelly M. Cross 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Angela M. Crowder 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Julie A. Crowley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Melissa L. Culkin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Danielle M. Culp 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kara C. Cumberland 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Brendan J. Curley 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Seniors 295 





Daniel M. Curley 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Maya Currimjee 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



Joseph M. Curran 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Sean P. Curtin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Paul A. Curtis 


Paul W. Cusack 


Rebecca L. Cyr 


Timothy W. Czech 


Adam D'Angelo 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Political Science 


Elementary Education 
General Science 


Biology 


Philosophy 


Accounting 
Philosophy 




Shannon K. Daley 


Linda M. Dallamoa 


David M. Daly 


Jon M. Daly 


Joseph Daly 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


English 


History 


Computer Science 


English 
Philosophy 


296 Class of 96 











) 



Lynn M. Damigella 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Parthena Dandis 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kimberly J. Dandreo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jessica A. Danehy 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Steven J. Dani 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 




Antanas Danys 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Nele Danzig 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Erin C. Daoust 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Erik Davey 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Allison Leigh David 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 




Jessica Paige David 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Christen L. Davis 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Michael J. Davidoff 

Arts & Sciences 
Biophysics 




Courtney L. Davis 

School of Management 
Accouting 




Seniors 297 



"How were you to know that 

you would be the lucky one... 

ain't it funny how time flies 

when the best was yet to 

come." 

-Bryan Adams 



298 



Class 



of 96 





Seniors 299 



Gina C. Davis 


Valerie L. Davis 


Sarah E. Dawgert 


Jennifer L. Dawson 


Kathleen M. Day 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


French 


Human Development 


Accounting 
Economics 


Economics 



Vy M. Deal 

School of Management 

Finance 



Kristin N. DeBisschop 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Lisa R. DeCastro 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Mathematics 



Wendy R. Decker 

Evening College 
Business Administration 







William Degan Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Neil C. Deininger 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kevin M. Delaney 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Danielle M. Dell 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Julie Dematteo 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./ Mod. Special 

Needs/ Human Dev. 



Gregory J. DeMelo 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 




Joey Lynn DeMeo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Lawrence H. DeMeo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Jason A. Demerjian 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Heidi A. Demeter 

School of Management 
Finance 



Molly E. Demianczyk 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



300 Class of '96 




John K. Dempsey 

School of Management 
Finance 



Paula DeNiemeyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Alicia M. Dennehy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Maura P. Dennehy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christie M. Dennis 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Celestino L. DePina 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Sociology 




Tricia M. DePodesta 

School of Management 
Accounting 





James H. DeRonck 


Michael R. DeRosa 


Gina V. DeSantis 


Monique A. Desmarais 


Sean T. Desmond 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sceinecs 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


English 
Spanish 


Political Science 


Secondary Education 
English 


English 

Seniors 301 



: 



"I forget what I was taught. 

I only remember what I have 

learnt. 

-Patrick WJiite 



302 






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Seniors 303 



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Megan P. Devers 


Elizabeth A. Devin 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Theatre Arts 


Nursing 


English 






Kathleen Devin 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Gregory W. Devlin 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Karen L. Devoe 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



■ 
Brad D. Dexter 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 



Angela M. Dibacco 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Antonio M. DiBenedetto 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Donna K. DiBona 

School of Management 
Finance 




Matthew J. Dickson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Martin W. Dietrich 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



James C. Digney 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Economics 



Richard A. Dilorio 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Peter Dimattia 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



304 Class of 96 



^ 




Lisa M. DiRocco 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Sociology 



Danielle DiSpena 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Sylvia C. DiVasta 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




&4* 



Daniel R. Dobbins 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christian A. Doheny 

School of Management 

Economics 
Oper. & Strat. Mgmt. 




Brigid H. Doherty 

chool of Management 
Finance 



Kristen L. Doherty 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Richard M. Dohoney 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Tobin T. Dominick 

School of Management 
Info. Systems/General 
Education/Human Dev. 



Joseph A. Donahue 

School of Education 

Elem.Ed./ Mod. Special 

Needs/ Mathematics 




Michael J. Donahue 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Amy E. Donnell 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Human Development 




Brendan D. Donohue 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kathleen K. Donovan 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Seniors 305 




Seniors 307 





Lotus J. Donovan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



David E. Dopf 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Linda Dorcena 

School of Management 
Business Management 



Walter J. Dorgan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Mathew A. Dorment 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History 



Megan L. Doughty 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Alyssa Dorrie 

Arts & Sciences 
English 
French 



Erin E. Dorsey 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Karen E. Dorsey 

School of Managemnent 

Accounting 
Human Resources Mgmt. 



Kristin L. Doton 

School of Management i 
Accounting 




Craig M. Douglas 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kimberly Dovin 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Sara E. Dowling 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Shawn J. Downes 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



308 Class of 96 



Michael Downs 

Arts & Sciences 
History 
Spanish 



Catherine E. Doyle 


Kathleen M. Doyle 


Brad G. Drabant 


Matthew J. Drap 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Scinces 


Nursing 


Sociology 


Biology 


Political Science 




Kristen L. Drayton 


J. Craig Dreves 


John P. Drew 


Karen M. Driscoll 


Karen M. Driscoll 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Evening College 


Early Childhood 


English 
Political Science 


English 


Elem. Ed./ Mod. Special 
Needs/ Child in Society 


Business Management 




Christopher G. 


Christopher P. Duane 


Silvia E. Duenas 


Joanne M. Duffy 


Michael A. Duffy 


Drozdowski 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Sociology 


Business Administration 


History 


Philosophy 








Spanish 




John R. Dufour 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

History 



Matthew R. Duggan 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Courtney B. Dumas 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Danielle M. Dupre 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jennifer K. Durka 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Seniors 309 



■ .: 



Danea D. Dutton 


Cathleen M. Dwyer 


James A. Dwyer 


David J. Dyer 


Stephanie F. Earls 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


English 


Human Resource 


Accounting 


English 






Management 


Finance 






Collin H. Earnst 


Marcy K. Eason 


Michael P. Eaton 


Gretchen L. Ebeler 


Naoki Ebisawa 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Sociology 


Environmental 
Geosciences 


Sociology 


English 
History 


Finance 




John O. Edmunds 


Katherine C. Edwards 


Brian W. Egan 


Rebecca M. Egan 


Katharina A. Eggmann 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Sociology 


Philosophy 
Psychology 


English 
Sociology 


Communications 




Justin J. Egoville 

School of Management 
Accounting 

310 Class of 96 



Christopher L. Eklund 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Sociology 



Kate A. El-Hillow 

School of Management 
Accounting 



David C. Elsaesser 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



ToddM. Emerick 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Kara V. Emerson 

Arts & Sciences 
Music 



Kate W. Emery 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Christen M. English 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Mark A. English 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Leiko Enseki 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 








Robert W. Erickson 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 




Angela A. Esmilla 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Damian J. Esparza 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Monica A. Espinel 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Jessica C. Esposito 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Marybeth D. Esposito 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Matthew D. Essick 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Economics 



Seniors 311 



Maria M. Estarellas 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Joseph N. Evangelista 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Alex C. Eykman 

Evening College 
Social Sciences 



Mathias M. Eykman 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



Eleanore F. Eyster 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Alicia Fabe 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 




Amy E. Fahey 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 





'**'* M 




Mark A. Faggiano 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 




James T. Faletra 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Political Science 




Craig R. Fallon 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

312 Class of 96 



Glen A. Fandetti 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kathryn M. Fanous 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Debra A. Farea 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Lara M. Farrell 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



John P. Farricy IV 


Nathan W. Fay 


Ramy Fayed 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Economics 


Economics 


Biology 



Amy Federline 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



James D. Feeley 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 




Flizabeth R. Feldman 


Jason R. Felipe 


Andrew C. Fellingham 


Alisha T. Fenton 


Sabato Ferrante 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Psychology 
Theater Arts 


History 


Sociology 
History 


Psychology 




4 hdiM 




Jeffrey M. Ferranti 


Richard J. Ferraro 


Victoria L. Ferraro 


Susan S. Ferrel 


James S. Ferris 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Biochemistry 


Biology 
Philosophy 


Marketing 


English 
History 


History 




Patrick M. Ferry 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Andrew L. Fetherston 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Sylvain C. Fey 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Political Science 



M 
David Ficociello 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Benjamin J. Figgie 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 

Seniors 313 





Michele L. Figueiredo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Meghan K. Finley 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Nicole N. Filiault 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Katie A. Finn 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Kettj A. Fiorenza 

Arts & Sciences 
Italian 
Spanish 



Daniel J. Fitzpatrick 

School of Management 
Finance 

314 Class of 96 



Jeb D. Fiorita 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Allyson A. Fish 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Nathaniel D. Fisher 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Grady O. Fitzpatrick 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lee C. Fitzpatrick 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 
Political Science 



Deirdre A. Fleming 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Anna M. Fitzgerald 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Patricia M. Fleming 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Robert C. Florek 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



James A. Flynn 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Mary Ellen Fogarty 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Melissa Foley 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Sarah M. Foley 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 




Mark A. Forand 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Michael W. Ford 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Theresa M. Forgach 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Susan L. Foster 

School of Management 
General Management 



Michael A. Fraczek 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 




Timothy R. Fradette 


Jessica E. Francis 


school of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


English 


Philosophy 







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Nicole K. Franconere 


LoriAnn Freda 


I School of Education 


School of Management 


Elementary Education 

i 


Marketing 




Seniors 315 



■■' " ■ ■■' 









Vs 



The days that make us happy make 
us wise. 

-John Masefield 




Seniors 317 



Albert R. Frederick 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Scott E. Freeman 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Claus C. Freyinger 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

French 



Shari L. Fries 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kendra E. Frisbie 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Alyssa C. Fritz 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Edward A.Fruscella 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Aaron Frutman 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Kathleen M. Frye 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Noriko Fukushima 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Christina M. Gabriel 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Marketing 



Kathleen M. Gaden 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Christina Gabrieloglou 

School of Management 
Marketing 



William J. Gaffney III 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lisa M. Gagliano 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 




Timothy R. Gagne 

School of Management 
Finance 

318 Class of 96 



Katie M. Gain 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jacqueline Gainer 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Computer Science 




Diane M. Galiano 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jeremiah R. Gall 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kerri E. Gallagher 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Mary Eileen Gallagher 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Thomas Q. Gallagher 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Steven M. Gallaway 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Thomas Gallen 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 





Kimberly C. Galligan 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History 




Sara A. Gammell 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./ Mod. Special 

Needs/ Psychology 




Suzie Ganhao 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Kerri B. Gannon 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Victor Ganson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Tamsen E. Garber 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmt. 

Marketing 



Aidan P. Garcia 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Marketing 



Seniors 319 



A friend is a person who 

knows you., but likes you 

anyway! 



320 



Class 



rf'96 





Seniors 321 




Alfredo G. Garcia 

School of Management 
Finance 



Angela M. Garcia 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Randi L. Garman 

School of Management 
Marketing 






Sara J. Garofalo 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Rachel B. Garvey 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Peter J. Gasparrini 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Brendan J. Gaughan 

School of Management 
Marketing 



ft 




Sean M. Gavin 

School of Management 

Finance 
Oper. & Strategic Mgmt. 

322 Class of 96 



Stephen J. Gawlik 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Chris M. Gay 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Gregory S. Gay 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Michael A. Gass 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 




Matthew J. Gavin 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Danielle L. Gdowski 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michael J. Geary 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Economics 



Suzanne M. Geden 

School of Management 

Marketing 

International Studies 



Brette N. Geiselman 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



m a 

Aleksandr Gekht 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 



Sara Genevich 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Mary F. Gens 

Evening College 
j Business Management 




Elizabeth A. Gentile 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Eric M. George 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 



A 

Michael A. Geraci 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Amy F. Gerardi 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Jill O. Gerety 

School of Management 
Accouting 



Tiffany E. Gerlt 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Fernando Giachino 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Joseph Giacona 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Nicole K. Giampapa 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




fl«AtB 



Jennifer M. Giampietro 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Penelope Giannakopoulos 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Rebecca L. Giersch 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Christopher J. Giglia 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Philosophy 



M. Todd Gilbert 

School of Management 
Economics 



Seniors 323 




o» 



T 




M. Todd Gilbert 

School of Management 
Economics 



Eamonn G. Gill 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Laurie A. Gilligan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Elizabeth M. Gilliland 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Sciences 




Jennifer A. Gilo 


Tracey S. Gilroy 


Alexandria E. Gionfriddo 


Mark W. Giovanniello 


Andrew A. Girardi 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Finance 
Communations 


English 


Accounting 


Communications 




Rebecca E. Gird 


Neil M. Giugno 


John S. Giuliano Jr. 


Nora C. Gleason 


Dennis M. Goett 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


Geology 


Accounting 
Finance 


Biochemistry 


Nursing 
Psychology 


Finance 


324 Class of 96 











f* < J 





Michael S. Goldberg 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Julie E. Goldman 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Theater Arts 



Stephen J. Goldner 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Timothy F. Golier 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

English 



Jennifer Gonzalez 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 




Magda Gonzalez-Marques 


John Goodrich 


Alana B. Gooley 


Wendy A. Gordon 


Sara N. Gottman 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Art History 


Finance 


English 


Communications 






Accounting 


Theater Arts 


Psychology 




Justin J. Gould 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Liane M. Gouthro 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Alexandra R. Govatsos 

Arts& Sciences 
Biology 



Stanley J. Grabish 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Seniors 325 






i fc *f i 



David M. Graham 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Mark Granada 

School of Management 
Finance 




Sara E. Grant 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jeffrey M. Grassi 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Sean M. Greene 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Michael J. Gregorski 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Gretchen M. Greisler 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Marissa Greve 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Keith M. Grier 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 




Andrea L. Griffin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Daniel V. Grillo 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Christine T. Grubert 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Gregory Guarneri 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



326 Class of '96 



Jeffrey L. Gubitosi 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Elisa M. Guerra 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Tara S. Guertin 

Evening College 
Art History 



Karen A. Gump 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Rakhi Gupta 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kristina D. Gustafson 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Todd Gustin 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Christian J. Gutkowski 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



David C. Gutkowski 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kari J. Guttman 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English 



Matthew J. Gwiazdoski 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Erik R. Habres 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Valerie Haese 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Matthew D. Haff 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Amy E. Hajjar 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Charles M. Haley 

Arts & Sciences 

Classics 

Mathematics 




Michael K. Haley 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Gregory S. Halstead 

School of Management 
Finance 



Tania Hamilton 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Siobhan V. Hammer 

Arts & Sciences 

Spanish 

International Studies 



Vera A. Handojo 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Chemistry 

Seniors 327 



— — — 



"And if I had the choice, ya- 
rd always want to be there. 
Those were the best days of 
my life." 

-Bryan Adams 






Seniors 329 




Jennifer L. Hanford 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Brendan M. Hanley 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Amy D. Hanrahan 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brian J. Hanson 

School of Management 
Finance 



1 




Lawrence R. Hare 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 




Heather M. Harnois 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Poppie E. Harris 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 





Ryan A. Harper 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Eileen H. Hart 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Psychology 




Mark F. Hartsell 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Cara Harvey 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Christopher J. Harwick 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Ari N. Haseotes 

School of Management 
General Management 



Karima A. Hassan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



330 Class of 96 



Daniel K. Hayhurst 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



John C. Healey 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



James A. Hazard 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Maura A. Hazelton 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Mark D. Hazlin 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



Brian J. Healey 

School of Management 
Finance 
English 




Aileen Healy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Laura M. Heaps 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Pamela J. Heffernan 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Gregory F. Hegerich 

School of Managagement 
Accounting 




flBriif^S 




Mary E. Heller 


Ricardo Hellmund 


Krista B. Helmetag 


John C. Helriegel 


Christopher E. Henderson 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


History 


Economics 


English 


Finance 
Psychology 


Finance 




Diane C. Henderson 


Kelley R. Hendricken 


Jonathan R. Henkin 


Lisa A. Henneberry 


Molly G. Hennessey 


Arts & Sciences 


Atrts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Psychology 


Economics 


Political Science 


English 


Sociology 


Sociology 


Oper. & Strategic Mgmt. 


Communications 


Seniors 331 




Jenifer M. Henry 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Erica K. Herberg 

School of Management i 
Accounting 




Robert J. Herbstzuber 

Arts & Sciences 
Geophysics 



Robinson Hernandez 

School of Management 
Finance 



Austin T. Herndon 

School of Management 
Finance 



Colette E. Hertel 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Brad G. Hickey 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Lenore M. Hickey 

School of Management 

Finance 
General Management 

332 Class of 96 



Maura A. Hickey 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Brooke W. Higgins 

Arts & Sciences 

Spanish 
Communications 



Dennis P. Higgins 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 
Economics 



Jason D. Hill 

School of Managemen 

Finance 

Economics 



.^^ 




Stephanie A. Hillstrom 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Music 



Robert E. Hines 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 



Kraig J. Hitchcock 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Lorena Ho 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



•1 



Thomas J. Hobbs 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Theodore A. Hodan 


Tammy M. Hodges 


Emily J. Hodgins 


Robert D. Hoffman 


Gloria E. Hofilena 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Scineces 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


History 


Biopsychology 


Communications 


Biochemisty 




Michael J. Hofman 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jennifer L. Hogan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




John P. Hogan 



Arts & Sciences 
History 



Melissa A. Hogan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Seniors 333 






"Some people, they're 

looking for paradise, others 

they're looking for inner 

light, me, I'm just having 

the time of my life." 

-Bryan Adams 





334 Class of '96 




Seniors 335 





Emma Holden-Hindley 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kevin M. Holmes 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Michael P. Hong 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Colleen M. Horan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Matthew R. Horan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



David A. Horn 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Vanessa L. Hosein 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ryan T. Hough 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Gregory M. Howe 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Gregory L. Howells 

School of Management 
Economics 

336 Class of '96 



Hollie K. Hromoho 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Arthur J. Hsu 

School of Management 
Finance 



Heidi E. Huber 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed./Mod. Special 
Needs/Child in Society 



David R. Huck 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



John R. Hughes 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Marketing 



Kevin A. Hughes 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael C. Huha 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Philana Hui 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Catherine A. Hull 

School of Management 
Human Resources Msmt. 




Diane M. Hull 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Thomas M. Hunt 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Michael G. Hurley 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Richard P. Hurley 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Stacey A. Hurley 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Dayna M. Hutchins 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Child in Society 



Yun S. Hwang 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



David M. Hymovitz 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Doreen E. Hynes 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Elizabeth M. Hynes 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 





Susan L. Iacono 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Steven M. Ialuna 

School of Management 
Computer Science 



Fiorentino F. Iantosca 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Economics 



Gina M. Iassogna 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Erin M. Igoe 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Seniors 337 



Ivan M. Ulan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Julian S. Inclan 

School of Management 
Economics 



Amy E. Inlow 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Makoto Isawa 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Ella A. Iszczyszyn 

School of Management 
Finance 




Jeffrey W. Ittel 

School of Management 
Marketing 



David A. Jagolinzer 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Dana E. James 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Joseph F. Janezic III 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Santiago E. Jaramillo i 



School of Managament i 

Gen. Mgmt./Finance 

History 




Keith C. Jaret 


Boris Jaskille 


Cynthia K. Jenner 


Anna-Lea Jenny 


Catherine Sarah Jensei 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


History 


Economics 
Spanish 


Elementary Education 
Human Development 


Sociology 


Nursing 




John C. Jensen 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Jennifer L. Jerutis 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Carlos E. Jimenez 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Josef K. Jindra 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Jennifer M. Johns 

School of Managemen' 
Marketing 



338 Class of 96 



Brendan J. Johnson 


Elizabeth A. Johnson 


Kevin M. Johnson 


Melissa B. Johnson 


Lissa M. Jolivert 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Mathematics 


English 


Nursing 


English 


Oper. & Strategic Mgmt. 













Elizabeth S. Jones 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Leah C. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Robert A. Jones 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Shawn S. Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Stephen Jones 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kieran M. Jordan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mark N. Jordan 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Psychology 

Seniors 339 



Albert G. Jovel 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 



John Ashley Judge 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 
Computer Science 



Trina L. Juliani 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Communications 



Samuel Juliao III 

School of Managment 

Finance 

Accounting 



Christina A. Jung 

School of Management 

Marketing 

French 




fc^fji 



J. Ryan Kane 


Jamie J. Kane 


Norah E. Kane 


Chong-Min Kang 


Grant A. Kaplan 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


General Management 


Nursing 


Sociology 


English 


Theology 
History 


340 Class of 96 












Preeti Kapoor 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Sarah A. Karaian 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Christopher T. Kardos 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Steven J. Karidas 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Travis A. Kassay 

School of Management 
Finance 
English 




Lambros Katsoufis 


Lauren J. Kaulback 


Jennifer L. Kavanaugh 


William J. Keane 


Timothy J. Kearns 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Operations & Strategic 


Psychology 


English 


Accounting 


History 


Management 


Sociology 










Kerry A. Keegan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Paul M. Keegan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



David J. Keeney 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Teresa Kefalogiannis 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Breiner E. Keil 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 




Matthew E. Keis 


Jennifer L. Keith 


Mary F. Kelleher 


Sara McGady Kelleher 


Kristine M. Kelley 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


Accounting 


Sociology 


English 


Elem. Ed./Early Childhood/ 


Nursing 


Finance 






Child in Society 


Seniors 341 



r 



' Why not' is a slogan for an 
interesting life." 

-Mason Cooley 




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342 



Class 



of 96 





Seniors 343 





William C. Kelley 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Psychology 



Dominic C. Kemps 

Arts & Sciences 
International Studies 



tV9\ ^^* 




Jonathan Kemmerer 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Peter T. Kenn 

School of Management 
Finance 




Peter T. Kennealey 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



M 

Joshua T. Kennedy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Shannon A. Kennedy 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Brendan P. Kenney 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



f 



• 



Kelly E. Kenny 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs | 




Rebekah Kenworthy 

School of Management 
Finance 

344 Class of '96 



Amanda P. Kenyon 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 



Janis E. Kersten 

School of Management 

Finance 
Oper. & Strategic Mgmt. 



Matthew P. Keswick 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Leila Kettani 

School of Managenemenr 

Marketing 

Finance 



George T. Khalil 

School of Management 
Finance 



Lina K. Khouri 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kimberly Khoury 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Sociology 



Ji Sue Kim 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Julie Kim 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 




Vincent J. Kim 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Young T. Kim 

School of Management 
Finance 



Hilary M. Kimblin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Gerard E. King 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



/I 

Gregory B. King 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




John W. King 


Susan E. Kingston 


Carolyn A. Kirk 


Alexander G. Kiss 


4rts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Geology 


History 


Economics 



Erika B. Klausz 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 




JeffKlecak 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Ann E. Kleven 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Katarzyna Klimek 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Ryan N. Kling 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Rebecca S. Knapp 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Philosophy 

Seniors 345 




Jennifer A. Knoll 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



Aimee E. Knott 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Matthew S. Knox 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Eric L. Knudsen 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 



Viggo A. Knudsen 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 




Nora T. Kochian 


Dane R. Koepke 


Melissa J. Kokoszka 


Jeffrey Kongthong 


George J. Konidaris 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Sociology 


Human Resources Mgmt. 
Psychology 


Biology 


Mathematics 


Biology 




Michael J. Konig 


Winston W. Koo 


Sudabeh Koochekzadeh 


Stephanie J. Kord 


Matthew R. Kosiorek 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Marketing 


English 


History 


Mathematics 
English 




Marie E. Kouba 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Psychology 

346 Class of '96 



Annie Kouyoumdjian 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Drew M. Kovalsky 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Richard S. Kranz 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kimberly G. Krentzmar ' 

Arts & Sciences 
French 




Amy S. Kress 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Malti R. Kripalani 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Studio Art 



Matthew D. Kroh 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jason A. Krom 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Melanie B. Kroungold 

School of Management 
General Management 





Kelly M. Krpata 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 




Jennifer L. Krueger 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Biology 




levin A. Krueger 


Argiroula M. Krypotos 


Lisa M. Krzastek 


Tara B. Kuehnle 


Eric Kung 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Spanish 
Sociology 


Communications 


Marketing 


Psychology 

Seniors 347 



'There is a magnet in your 

heart that will attract true 

friends.. 

-Paramahansa Yogananda 





Seniors 349 



Chia-Yin Grace Kuo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Juli A. Kuo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kristin M. LaBelle 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Katherine C. Lacoste 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 



Katherine A. Ladetto 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Kris Lynn Lamarre 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

350 Class of '96 



Megan A. Lammon 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Nicole M. Lamore 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Joanna Landivar 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brian P. Lane 

School of Management 
Economics 



Christopher R. Lane 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Jessica C. Lane 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Psychology 



John K. Lang 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Sociology 



Melissa A. Langley 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Andrew J. Lanik 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Alicia Lankester 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

General Science 



Richard J. Lannen 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Sandra J. Lanphear 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Kenneth R. Larason 

School of Management 
Finance 



Carol N. Lau 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Michael F. Laudati 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Ann Lauria 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Human Resources 



Heather N. Lavers 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Brian M. Lawler 

Evening College 
Business Management 



Erin M. Lawler 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Ricky H. Lawson 


Ania M. Lazarska 


Katharine D. Leahy 


Michael J. Lear 


Katherine M. Leary 




Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


School of Management 




Sociology 


Marketing 


Nursing 


Marketing 


Accounting 

Seniors 


351 









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<z? 



Elizabeth J. Lease 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Nicole L. LeBlanc 

School of Management 
Human Resources 




Sandra E. LeBlanc 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Communications 



Andrea M. LeBlond 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Mary E. LeBoeuf 


Gene W. Lee 


Michael R. Lee 


Victor Lee 


Winnie J. Lee 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Managemen 


Nursing 


Finance 


Finance 


Communications 


Accounting 




Eric D. Lefaivre 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

352 Class of 96 



Christopher J. LeFevre 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Melissa A. Leier 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Carl F. Leino 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kristy A. Leissle 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Jenna T. Lejeune 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Pascale E. Lemoine 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Anne Lent 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Christian H. Leon 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jessica J. Leonard 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Kerry A. Leonard 


Sarah Leonard 


Marisa A. Leonardini 


David Leong 


Maureen E. Lerz 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Art History 


Philosophy 


English 


Finance 


Accounting 
Finance 




John M. Lesher 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Altina F. Lester 

Evening College 
Business 



Megan J. Lessard 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Rachelle A. Letersky 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Seniors 353 




// 



The journey is the reward. 

~Tao saying 



n 




UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME 

_ founded by the ^^ 

| Congregat^pn <g| Holy Cross 






Seniors 355 




Melanie M. Letzring 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Carolyn S. Levy 

School of Management 
Finance 



Scott S. Licata 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Marisa J. Lidecis 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Matthew J. Liebmann 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theology 




Keith D. Lillis 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kris N. Limaye 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Xiao B. Lin 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Peter Y. Ling 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Brian Hanlon Linnihann 

School of Management [ 
Finance 




Erin E. Lippincott 


Scott Lisbon 


Chris D. Liscio 


Merrie M. Liu 


Antonio Lloves 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Accounting 


Sociology 


Finance 


Biology 
Psychology 




Joseph M. Lobozzo 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 

356 Class of 96 



Jacqueline M. Loehr 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Jason M. Loia 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Marc C. Lombardi 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



Suzanne S. Long 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Mariessa B. Longo 


Tracey M. Longo 


Patricia M. Looney 


Alexis C. Loper 


Todd D. Lopez 


School of Education 


School of Education 


School of Education 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Elementary Education 


Elem. Ed./English 


Elementary Education 


Elementary Education 


Finance 


Human Development 


Moderate Special Needs 


Moderate Special Needs 


Human Development 






Craig S. Louiselle 


Anne Katherine Lowry 


Anthony B. Lucarelli Jr. 


Patricia R. Luck 


David Luczynski 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Political Science 


Accounting 


Commuications 


Political Science 


Oper. & Strategic Mgmt. 




Finance 




Spanish 
Seniors 357 




Kristen A. Luebbers 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Nampeera A. Lugira 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Adilia L. Lugo 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Marius M. Lund 

School of Management 
Finance 





Christopher M. Lust 

School of Management 
Finance 




Sean F. Lynch 


Tara Lynch 


William J. Lyons 


Edward F. Macchi 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Sociology 


Philosophy 


English 


358 Class of 96 









Jonathan A. MacDonal 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscieni 






Shannon M. Mac Donald 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



William J. Macey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Jennifer M. Machado 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lindy C. MacKinnon 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Donald R. MacLeod HI 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 




Jon Macquarrie 

Arts & Sciences 
Politcal Science 



Joseph C. Maffei 

School of Management 
Information Systems 



Trevor H. Magee 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brian P. Maggiacom 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Brian Magovern 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Jennifer A. Mahoney 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Lesley A. Mahoney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Lynn M. Mahoney 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Dana E. Mainelli 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kevin J. Makati 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 




Kevin P. Maloney 

School of Management 
Finance 



Denise M. Malvinni 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Bryan B. Manahan 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Nicolette S. Manahan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Amy C. Mangiaracina 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 359 





Katherine B. Mannen 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kelly A. Mannion 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Michele L. Marallo 

School of Education 
Early Childhood 
Child in Society 



Joseph T. Marcelonis 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Vydas Marijoslus 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Kristin M. Markowski 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Elaine Marks 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 




Rebecca L. Marlis 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jeremy C. Marottolo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Tiffany Marr 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Laurie L. Marry 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Anne E. Marshall 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer R. Marshall 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Nancy A. Marshall 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt. 



360 Class of '96 



Christine Martin 


Karen F. Martin 


Marianne Martin 


Mariano E. Martinez 


Jennifer M. Martyn 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Marketing 


English 


Finance 


English 




Psychology 




Accounting 


Communications 




Thomas F. Marx 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Lisa A. Marzetti 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Timothy C. Mason 


Michelle A. Massiglia 


Peter J. Mastella 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Biology 


Economics 
Philosophy 




Ernesto A. Mathies Hill 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Kerrie A. Matson 

Evening College 
Psychology 



Michael D. Mathis 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Darren David K. 
Matsumoto 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Seniors 361 




''And your smile is fine, and it's 
just like mine, and it won't go 

away..." 

-Lowest of the Low 











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BBS 


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Seniors 363 




Anne K. Maxson 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Sociology 



Javier J. Maynulet 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Hope McAndrew 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Ayumi K. Matsunaga-Cooper 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Margaret C. Maupin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 



Shannon R. McBriar 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kimberly S. Mattson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Lisa M. Mauro 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Sarah K. McCandless 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Kathleen A. McCarthy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kathleen H. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
Classics 



Kathleen M. McCarthy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Kevin M. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Maureen E. McCarthy 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



364 Class of 96 




k 



Sheilah E. McCarthy 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kristen M. McClanaghan 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Spanish 



Christopher J. McCobb 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Economics 



Casey C. McComas 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

Biochemistry 



Joseph A. McCreesh III 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Katherine McCurdy 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Christopher P. McDevitt 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Daniel P. McDonald 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Noreen E. McDonagh 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Patricia M. McDonagh 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Sean F. McDonnell 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Brian J. McDonough 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Mary Croom McDow 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Trevor S. McGill 

Arts & Sciences 

Politcal Science 

Philosophy 



Juliet H. McGinley 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Kerry A. McGinn 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Marie Elena McGonigle 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Hispanic Experience 



Mary Elizabeth McGovern 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Patrick D. McGovern 

School of Management 
Finance 



Meredith A. McGrady 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Seniors 365 




366 Class 




Seniors 367 





Leigh C. McGrale 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



i. . 

life 

David H. McGrath 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Sociology 




Jennifer M. McGrath 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sean M. McGrath 

School of Management 

Finance 
Oper. & Strategic Mgmt. 



Heather J. McGuire 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Clifton A. McHale 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Moira M. Mcintosh 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 





John T. McHale 

School of Management! 

Finance 

Human Resources 




Kelley L. Mclntyre 

School of Management; 
General Management 




Michael S. McKeigue 

School of Education 
Human Development 

368 Class of 96 



Lori J. McKenna 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 



Seph S. McKenna 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Karen A. McKeon 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Lynne M. McKeown 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Katherine E. McKinley 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Kathryn K. McLaughlin 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Mary Ann McLaughlin 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Patricia M. McLaughlin 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Human Resources Mgmt. 



Thomas D. McLaughlin 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Tammy L. McLoughlin 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Philosophy 



Mark F. McManmon 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 



Naomi B. McManus 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Suzanne J. McMullen 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Amanda B. McMurtrie 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Special 

Needs/Child in Society 




Jennifer M. McNally 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Melissa M. McNamara 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Heather L. McNeil 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed. /Mod. Special 
Needs/Child in Society 



Tarez J. McNeil 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Torrance J. McNeil 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Catherine M. McParland 

I Evening College 



Katherine B. McSorley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



James P. McVety 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Angela J. McVey 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Tamara H. Meade 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Seniors 369 





Massiel P. Medina 


Cynthia M. Meglio 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Sociology 


Nursing 


Economics 






Nick R. Mehra 

School of Management 
Finance 



Amit Mehrotra 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 





Samuel S. Melei 


Jennifer A. Mello 


Andrea M. Melton 


Jocelyn C. Mendoza 


Jason A. Menendez 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


History 


Early Childhood Education 
Child in Society 


Communications 


Political Science 
Economics 


Marketing 




Maria Menendez 


Michael Mensa 


Kirk E. Merriam 


Michelle M. Messina 


Scott J. Michalman 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Finance 
Economics 


Finance 
Marketing 


Marketing 


English 


370 Class of '96 











I 





1 



M^i*4>M 




Matthew P. Michelman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Mark S. Mick 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Steven A. Migliero Jr. 

School of Management 
Finance 



Elizabeth M. Mignone 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Keith G. Milano 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Suzanne J. Milbauer 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Zebulon V. Miletsky 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Mark T. Milford 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Colleen E. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Laura A. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
Enalish 




Maureen P. Miller 

School of Management 

Computer Science 

Accounting 



Peta-Gaye M. Miller 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Thomas M. Mills 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Corrina G. Minnar 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Seniors 371 



: 



' I know it was wonderful, 
but I don't know how I did 
it. 

-Laurence Oliver 





^ 




Seniors 373 




Teresa Minus 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Computer Science 



Robin N. Mitchell 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Nelson F. Miranda 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Black Studies 



Eric C. Mirich 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



David C. Mitchell 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Erin E. Mitchell 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 




Yordiansyah Moelia 

School of Management 
Economics 



Chandra A. Mohammed 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Sunita Mohan 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Brian M. Monahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Kathleen Monahan 

School of Management 
Finance 



William T. Monahan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Elizabeth C. Mongoven 

Arts & Sciences 

History 

Economics 



John Christian Montes 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

International Studies 



Jeffrey J. Moohr 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Film Studies 




Cindy Moons 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 

374 Class of 96 



Kerry A. Moore 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lauren K. Moore 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Michaela S. Moore 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

History 



Melissa A. Moorehouse 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Erin E. Moran 


Elizabeth L. Moreland 


Christine M. Morelli 


Darwin Morency 


Ryan W. Morgan 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Nursing 


Accounting 


Biochemistry 


Psychology 


Politcal Science 
English 





Shayne Morgan 

School of Management 
Finance 




Tracey J. Morin 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Neil M. Morrison 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Thomas J. Morrison 

Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Biology 



Thomas B. Morse 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Rachel K. Mott 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Mary P. Moulton 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Seniors 375 



"Life is what you make it. 

Live it up! It's right there 

for you to take it I" 

-REO Speedwagon 






Seniors 377 



Marybeth Mount 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Meghan A. Mueller 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 



Lori A. Mulcahy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Megan E. Mulcahy 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Erin A. Muldoon 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 




Kathleen A. Mullen 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 

378 Class of 96 



Katie L. Mulligan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Sara Mulligan 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Darcy A. M ullin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Tony M. Mullin 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Mark T. Mulvoy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Kristen E. Mundhenk 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Nathan T. Munger 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Caitlin A. Murphy 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Karen D. Murphy 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Kevin Murphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Meeghan A. Murphy 

School of Management 
Finance 



Melissa A. Murphy 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 



Meredith C. Murphy 

School of Management 
Finance 



Joanna C. Murray 

School of Management 
Finance 




Stephen H. Murray 


Suzanne E. Murray 


Christine M. Musso 


Brian P. Nadeau 


Jennifer L. Nadeau 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Communications 


English 


Accounting 


Finance 


Marketing 




History 


Finance 




Human Resources Mgmt 




Candace T. Nakagawa 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Stephen H. Nakamura 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Azim Nakhooda 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Christina L. Nash 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Ed. 

Psychology 



John T. Nash 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Seniors 379 





Matthew R. Nash 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Raul Necochea 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Brian P. Negri 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jessica Negroni 

School of Education 
Elem. Ed./Mod. Special 

Needs/Music 




Lori A. Neill 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources Mgmt. 



Jean-Remy E. Neptune 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemisty 



Mychell A. Neptune 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Gregory Nerpouni 

School of Management 
Computer Science 



Paulo J. Neves 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 




Kristen D. Neville 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Dien V. Nguyen 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Hanh Nguyen 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Vilayphon Nhongvongsouthy 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Nancy S. Nicholson 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



380 Class of '96 



Michelle Niem 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Oliver C. Nivaud 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Lori Nizielski 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Mark L. Noferi 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Rachael E. Nokes 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Elizabeth J. Noone 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Mark F. Norkus 

School of Management 
General Management 



Kathryn A. Norton 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Christopher M. Novak 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Lisanna P. Novey 

Arts & Sciences 
Art History 




Melissa J. Nussbaum 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Sandra A. Nystrom 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kristen E. Nygaard 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 




Becky M. O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Seniors 381 




Kerry Ann O'Brien 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Mary Frances O'Brien 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Ronan M. O'Byrne 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Brian J. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



James J. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Kelly M. O'Connor 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

382 Class of 96 



Kristine A. O'Connor 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Theology 



Kristen E. O'Dell 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Maureen A. O'Doherty 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Kristin M. O'Donnell 

Arts & Sciences 
English 







Jennifer L. O'Dowd 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Peggy M. O'Keefe 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Claire P. O'Meara 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



James V. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 
Computer Science 



Jennifer A. O'Neill 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Kimberly A. O'Neill 

Schooi of Nursing 
Nursing 



Maura C. O'Regan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michael P. O'Reilly 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Daniel O'Shea 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Amy K. O'Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 




Justin M. O'Sullivan 


Alissa Ocasio 


Michael A. Odiotti 


James A. Odium 


Kristen D. Odium 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Economics 


Finance 


Finance 
Accounting 


Spanish 




Keun Byul Ok 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Diana M. Oliva 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lori A. Olmsted 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Tara Olsen 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Christopher J. Olson 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 383 



* 



And we'll drink, not to forget, but to 
remember instead, all our happy 
years. 

-Lowest of the Low 




Seniors 385 




William J. Olson 

School of Management 
romp. Sci./Info. Systems/ 
Oper. & Strategic Mgmt. 




Richard J. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Psychology 



Adrien Kian Yiong Ong 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Economics 



Angelita H. Ongcapin 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Joseph J.M. Orabona 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Emmanouel A. Orfanos 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Danielle C. Orland 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 




John B. Osborne 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Daniel J. Oriskovich 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Marilyn Ortiz 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Matthew A. Osborne 

School of Management 
Finance 



Divina L. Osmena 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Maye P. Ostowani 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Melanie G. Ouellette 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



386 Class of 96 



Michelle R. Ouellette 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

English 



Maurice D. Ouimet Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Leonardine Pacombe 

School of Management 

Accounting 
Human Resources Mgmt. 



Jodi C. Page 

School of Management 
Finance 



Lisa J. Pagliari 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Tharakesh Palanisaim 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Effie Panagiotakis 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Chris Papalilo 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer Paparteys 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



John Pappas 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Sociology 




Adriana C. Pardo 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Rob E. Pardue 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Marketing 



Heather M. Parillo 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Mansoo Park 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Susan Park 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Amy P. Parks 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Erin M. Parks 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Jennifer N. Passonno 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Shirali P. Patel 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Lynn M. Patterson 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Seniors 387 





Wendy A. Patterson 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Robert J. Paul 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Kristopher J. Paulsen 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Michelle L. Pavidis 

School of Management 
Economics 




Bryan W. Payne 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Matthew S. Pazaras 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Jeremy L. Pearlman 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Brooke E. Pearson 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Thomas D. Peeney 

School of Management 
Human Resources Mgmt. 




Jennifer R. Peffer 


John E. Peltonen 


Christine A. Pepe 


Annabell Perez 


Vianka S. Perez 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


English 


Biology 
Philosophy 


Biology 
Psychology 


Sociology 


388 Class of 96 











Laura E. Pernaa 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Aimee M. Perron 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Dejana M. Perrone 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Stephanie J. Perrotti 

Arts & Sciences 

French 

Philosophy 



tit 



Lia A. Pesce 

Arts & Sciences 
Italian 




Kristen M. Peters 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jessica L. Peterson 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Carla M. Petruccelli 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Biology 



Ryan Patrick Phair 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

FilmStudies 



Gregg A. Phillips 

Evening College 
Business Management 




Kristy M. Phillips 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael J. Piantanida 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mathematics 



Lindsay A. Phillips 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Psychology 




Cassia C. Picard 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 




Seniors 389 




Seniors 391 





Christopher C. Piccione 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Debra A. Piemonte 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Matthew T. Piersol 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Franco W. Pietri Leith 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 




Mihalis I. Piperakis 

School of Management 
General Management 



Eve M. Piscina 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Diana C. Pisciotta 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jamey A. Pittman 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Anna Pizarro 

Arts & Sciences 
English 





Michael D. Pizarro 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Anne P. Pizzuto 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



* 

Stephanie E. Planz 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Gregory M. Poehler 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Gerry Polyhronopouios 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



392 Class of 96 




V" •" 



Kristen A. Pomer 


Matthew J. Popalo 


Meena M. Popat 


John F. Popp 


Yolanda D. Poradowski 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Marketing 


Nursing 


Communications 


Biology 


Communications 












Alexandra J. Porter 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Tanisha L. Poteet 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kathleen M. Powers 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Special 

Needs/English 



Marc H. Poyant 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Paul Presti 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Tiffany K. Preston 


Jeffrey C. Previte 


Michelle D. Prewitt 


Christine C. Prokoski 


Matthew J. Prybylski 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Biology 


Environmental Geoscience 


Nursing 


Marketing 


Finance 




Brian J. Pryor 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Jeffrey F. Przech 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Erin E. Purcell 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kathleen M. Quackenbush 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Mod. Special 

Needs/Human Dev. 



John J. Queally 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 393 



Carolyn R. Quinn 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Edward P. Quinn 

School of Management 
Finance 



Heather C. Quinn 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Philosophy 



Michael E. Quinn 

Evening College 
History 



Michael T. Quinn 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

English 




■ dbfedf, 




Patrick G. Quinn 

School of Management 
Finance 



Robert Joseph Ragasa 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Ingrid I. Ramos 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Jonathan C. Quitasol 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 
Psychology 



Michael V. Rabuffo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Michael C. Radocchio 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nadia Ragab 

Arts & Sciences 
History 





^M* 




Maureen T. Raguso 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Debbie-Ann N. Ralston 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 



Michael Rambasek 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Todd M. Ramm 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 




Xiomara E. Ramos 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Matthew W. Rand 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychobiology 



Jeffrey Randazza 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Amy Raudenbush 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



394 Class of '96 



Kerry A. Rawdon 

School of Management 
Marketing 
Psychology 



Colleen D. Raymond 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Zed M. Reagan 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Mary R. Reardon 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 



Michelle L. Reardon 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Economics 




Shannon A. Reed 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Computer Science 



William D. Reed III 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Erin E. Reedy 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Doug Reepmeyer 

School of Management 
Finance 



Kacee R. Reese 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Seniors 395 



Susan E. Reeves 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael J. Regan 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Moira O. Regan 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Political Science 



Trisha L. Regan 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Theresa A. Regli 

Arts & Sciences 
French 




James M. Reichle 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 




Claire W. Reilly 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Moderate Special 

Needs/Human Dev. 




Joseph H. Reilly 

School of Management 
Finance 

396 Class of 96 




Scott D. Reinke 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Kimberly A. Reisinger 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Caitlin L. Remby 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Erik F. Reifenstahl 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




H. Marie Reilly 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Roberto B. Reyes Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 
Management 




M 



Alice E. Reynolds 

Arts & Sciences 
Classics 



Alison H. Reynolds 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Kate Reynolds 

School of Management 
Finance 



Joshua T. Rhodes 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Anthony E. Rich 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




4 fc 



Kirsten L. Richardson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Genna M. Ricotta 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer Riela 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 



Annmarie Riley 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 
Communications 



Patrick F. Riley 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Brendan A. Ring 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Michael G. Risbano 

Arts & Sciences 
Theology 



Joseph A. Ritchie 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Gena C. Rivera 

Arts & Sciences 
French 



Karen E. Rizzuto 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Melissa C. Robbins 


Kristen M. Roberts 


Weba Roberts 


Elizabeth Robinson 


Giles W. Robinson 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


arly Childhood Education 


Communications 


English 


Human Resource Mgmt. 


History 


Human Development 






Psychology 


Spanish 

Seniors 397 




Monica T. Robinson 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Paul A. Roche 

School of Management! 
Finance 




Alicia F. Rodgers 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Psychology 



Athena M. Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Carmen-Lucia Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Max E. Rodriguez 

School of Management 

Finance 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Yasmin Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Mary Rogers 

School of Education 
Intense Special Education 



Amy E. Rolinson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Sandra A. Rolston 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Debra J. Roman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Lisa A. Ronzoni 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



398 Class of 96 



Johanna M. Roodenburg 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Elizabeth C. Ros 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Victor F. Rosado 

School of Management 
Finance 



Megan K. Ross 

Aits & Sciences 
Economics 



James R. Roth 

School of Management 
Finance 




Emily Anne Rotondi 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Communications 



Jocelyne M. Rousselle 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Margaret L. Roy 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Patricia S. Roy 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Robin D. Rozycki 

School of Management 
Marketing 




Joseph Rubbo 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Brooke E. Ruberti 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Jacqueline A. Ruckel 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



James M. Ruel 

School of Management 
Finance 




Seniors 399 



Treat your friends as you do 
your pictures, and place 
them in the best light." 

-Jennie Jerome Churchill 






Seniors 401 



Prudence A. Ruelas 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Tellie C. Ruffin 

Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Kate T. Ruggieri 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Political Science 



Kerri Concetta Rupp 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michele M. Rusnak 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 




Judith B. Russell 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer L. Russo 

Evening College 

Psychology 

Business Administration 



David J. Ryan 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



John P. Ryan 

)1 of Manage 
Marketing 



School of Management 



Frank P. Rybinski 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Magathe I. Sagna 


Vivek V. Sailam 


Eric D. Sakalowsky 


Pablo J. Sala 


Susan E. Saliba 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Biology 


History 


Marketing 


Political Science 


Information Systems 












Anthony P. Salina 

School of Management 

General Management 

Sociology 



Thomas R. Salmen 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Patrick R. Salmon 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Jennifer L. Salvador 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Susan K. Sambora 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



402 Class of 96 



Beverly A. Sampson 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Eric S. Sampson 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 



Giannina M. Sanchez 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

French 



Pamela M. Sanchez 

School of Management 
Finance 




Brian M. Sankey 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Yousef Sarandah 

School of Management 

General Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Takeshi Sato 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 



Rose M. Sattler 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Adam M. Sandberg 

School of Management 
Finance 




Rebecca A. Sanford 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Ian Sangenito 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Jessie E. Saul 

Arts & Sciences 
Physics 



Seniors 403 



'Do not delay; the golden 
moments fly I" 

-Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 





Seniors 405 






M*lM 




Richard P. Sawchak 

School of Management 

Finance 

Theology 



Benjamin T. Sawyer 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Eric C. Scammons 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Cynthia Rose Scanned 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jennifer M. Scaring 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 




Eric B. Schenker 

School of Management 
Economics 




Jason Schermerhorn 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 






Stephanie K. Schepis 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Robert F. Scheu 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Erik D. Schietinger 


Jessica A. Schill 


Todd C. Schirmang 


Peter E. Schlampp 


Anna M. Schmid 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


English 


Psychology 


Biology 
Computer Science 


Geology 


6 Class of 96 











Charles M. Schneider 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Matthew T. Schneider 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Michael A. Schneider 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Amy R. Schoeffield 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Heather M. Schofield 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Erika L. Schonberg 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
Communications 



Thomas J. Schroeppel 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Suzanne M. Scott 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Matthew M. Scullin 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Stephen J. Scully 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Jennifer L. Scutt 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Erin R. Sebo 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael R. Segalini 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Aurencio S. Seguritan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Eric J. Seiler 

School of Management 
Finance 




Paul M. Selin 


Andrea L. Seminara 


Robert J. Separ 


Laura B. Sexton 


Julie M. Sforza 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Mathematics 


Finance 


Marketing 


Communications 


Spanish 


Philosophy 


Marketing 


Information Systems 


Psychology 


Seniors 407 





Jacquelyn M. Shaffner 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Vimal H. Shah 

School of Management 
Accounting 



\_y 



Janine Shaghalian 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Lauren Shannon 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 




Nicole C. Shapley 

School of Education 

Elem. Ed./Moderate Special 

Needs/Human Dev. 



Sally P. Sharkey 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



John W. Shea 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Bridget M. Sheehan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Susan A. Sheehan 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




Kathleen A. Sheridan 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Jason M. Shevland 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Fuzhen Shi 

Evening College 
Management 



Sha-Sha Shiau 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Sarah E. Shields 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



408 Class of 96 




Loretta C. Shing 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ari Shocket 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



James T. Shoukas 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Allison G. Shoule 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 



Marni Shreck 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 




^4, 

'"Mai's 




Danielle M. Shuckra 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Stephen B. Shunk 


Annie E. Siciliano 


Jennifer A. Sierveld 


Alexi Siglin 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


English 


Accounting 


History 
Sociology 




Aaron L. Silva 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 



Karen A. Silva 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Jeremy L. Silva 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




John M. Simoes 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 




Seniors 409 




Shawnna E. Sisca 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Erinn E. Skeffington 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Gavin Skillman 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



April D. Skou 

School of Management 
Finance 



Sarah A. Slattery 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




Christopher E. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 

410 Class of 96 



Christopher G. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Daphne M. Smith 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Derek D. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Gregory P. Smith 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Justice Smith 


Kellie P. Smith 


Kimberly M. Smith 


Linda A. Soave 


Paula Sobral 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


English 


English 
Theology 


English 


Political Science 




Stacey T. Sokol 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Amy B. Solomon 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Richard Kiwoo Song 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Jennifer Sotirion 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Spanish 




Robyn N. Spagnuolo 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Stacey E. Spall 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Frances A. Spaulding 

School of Management 

Finance 

Political Science 



Jeffrey P. Spear 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Heather M. Spellman 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 





Jennifer L. Spellman 


Scott C. Spencer 


Sally A. Spiegel 


Margo E. Spinale 


Kelly R. Spooner 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Evening College 


School of Education 


School of Education 


nvironmental Geoscience 


History 


English 


Elementary Education 
Human Development 


Elementary Education 
Spanish 

Seniors 411 



Hold a true friend with both 
hands. 

-Nigerian proverb 





Seniors 413 




Patrick W. Sprunger 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Vanessa J. Squitieri 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Farah N. St. Amand 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



John J. St. Germain 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 



Stephanie R. St. Onge 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 




Wilfredo C. Sta. Ana 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 




Jeff S. Staley 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 






Craig T. Stack 

School of Management 
Finance 




Matthew G. Stanchek 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




J.Courtney Standish 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English 



Richard P. Staropoli 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 



Robert P. Stefaniak 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Studio Art 



Karen A. Stein 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Political Science 



Robert W. Steinmetz 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 
Philosophy 



414 Class of 96 



Nicholas D. Stellakis 


Christopher T. Stephen 


Erin M. Stepno 


Chloe R. Stewart 


Travis J. Stewart 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Psychology 


Political Science 


Biochemistry 


Finance 


Human Development 




Jason C. Stillwagon 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Kira M. Stokes 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Keith E. Stone 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Susan E. Stravin 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 



Mary B. Stroiney 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 




Lucas M. Stuart 


Sanya Sukduang 


School of Management 


Arts & Science 


Finance 


Biology 



Brian T. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Germanic Studies 



Courtney K. Sullivan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Oper.and Strategic Mgmt. 



J. Colin Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



^1 ' §Bh 

Peter J. Sullivan 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 
Economics 




Sheri A. Sullivan 

Evening College 
Psychology 



William F. Sullivan 

School of Education 
Human Development 



Tini S. Sultan 

School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resource Mgmt. 



Kevin K. Sun 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Seniors 415 





Am^M 



Richard S. Sunden 

School of Management 
Finance 



George P. Suranyi 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Utami Suryaputri 

School of Management 
Finance 



Melissa W. Sutphin 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Kate Swalling 

School of Management 

Marketing 

English 



John A. Swanciger Jr. 

School of Management 
Finance 



John B. Sweeney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Paul F. Sweeney 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Nicole Sweeny 

School of Management i 
Marketing 




Caren Swift 


Margaret E. Swope 


Patrick R. Sylvester 


Andreas Szabados 


Mark D. Szal 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Nursing 


Political Science 


Biochemistry 
Mathematics 


English 
Philosophy 


Class of '96 











Kristina H. Szczepanski 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Scott M. Szczesny 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Sociology 



Tania W. Tahlawi 

School of Education 

Special Ed./Mathematics 

Computer Science 



Sahar Taleb 

School of Education 

Special Needs 

Psychology 



Maia N. Tamanakis 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Philosophy 




Marian T. Tanglaw 


Jeana B. Tavares 


Stephanie M. Taverna 


Jessica D. Taylor 


Renalyn F. Te 


>chool of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Accounting 


Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 


English 


Biology 


English 




Rhonda L. Terrill 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Aimee Teslaw 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Seniors 417 



Someday well find it- the Rainbow 
Connection; the lovers, the dreamers, 

and me. 

-Kermit the Frog 




; ; . J 



Seniors 419 



John D. Tessel 

Evening College 
Computer Info. Systems 



Brian P. Teter 

Evening College 
Management 



Molly M. Thilman 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Robin E. Thomaier 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Sarah C. Thomas 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 




James R. Thomasch 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Njeri M. Thompson 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Julie Thornton 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Deborah A. Tierney 

Evening College 
Communications 



Karen W. Y. Ting 

School of Management 
Accounting 








Anne O. Toal 


Nicholas F. Tocci III 


Doris B. Tom 


Tobin D. Tornehl 


Jose A. Torres 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Marketing 


Secondary Education 
History 


English 


Accounting 


Accounting 




Loyda Torres 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



Lauren K. Torrisi 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Guillaume C. Tourniaire 

Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 
French Literature 



Scott Tower 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Nicole M. Traficante 

School of Management 
Accounting 



420 Class of '96 







Melissa M. Trainer 


Joseph A. Tramazzo 


Michelle A. Tramonte 


Sebastien Tran 


Christiane D. Trani 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Psychology 


Finance 


Marketing 


Biochemistry 


Elementary Education 




Marketing 




Sociology 


Human Development 





Paul A. Traynor 

School of Management 
Accounting 




Trang M. Trinh 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 





James M. Troiano 


Marianne G. Troiano 


Anne M. Tropeano 


Amber J. Trudel 


Ivan P. Tse 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Economics 


English 


Nursing 


English 

Seniors 421 




Seniors 423 





Yuet Ying Tse 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 



James Kuang-Cheng Tsen 

Evening College 
Business Administration 





rf^Aifc 



Alexander Tsianatelis 


Shawn E. Tubman 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


English 


Communications 


Greek 


Marketing 




nthony J. Tullock 


John T. Tully 


James M. Tuminello 


Jane E. Tumminia 


Raymond M. Turek 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


History 


English 


Political Science 


Chemistry 




Joe N. Turmell 

School of Management 
Marketing 

424 Class of '96 



Louisa A. Turner 

Arts & Sciences 

Environmental Geosciences 

Spanish 



Cornelius T. Tyrrell 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Megumi Ueda 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Sean Uiterwyk 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Mark W. Ulrich 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Lyle M. Underkoffler 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Rusen Unsal 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Yolanda A. Urbanski 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Nathaniel F. Uttaro 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History 




Virginia Vaca 


Justin T. Valbert 


Leyla V. Valenick 


Robert S. Valenti 


Christine M. Valentine 


chool of Nursing 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Nursing 


History 


Biology 
English 


Finance 
Accounting 


Accounting 




John F. Valentino 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Roxanne M. Valentino 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 




Marianne Varhue 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 



Rominder S. Varma 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 




Seniors 425 



Michael J. Varoudakis 


Jacqueline C. Vasile 


Fidel E. Vasquez 


Vassiliki Vassiliou 


Catalina Vazquez 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Elemenatry Education 


Finance 


Psychology 


Biology 




Moderate Special Needs 


Marketing 


Communications 






Ryan P. Venditti 


Joel L. Vengco 


Kevin J. Veronneau 


Giannandrea Verri 


Nicole J. Vigna 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Biology 


Psychology 


Economics 


Biology 




Psychology 


Studio Art 




Sociology 




Paolo L. Villasenor 


Vincent D. Visceglia 


Anthony Visone 


Christine L. Vivo 


Frederick J. Voccola 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Biochemistry 


Sociology 


Finance 
Italian 


Biology 


Finance 




Nicolaus A. Von Gymnich David V. Von Klemperer 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Political Science Computer Science 



Lisa Wadland 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Wendy D. Wagner 

Evening College 
Business Management 



Mark O. Wainwright 

School of Management 
Finance 



426 Class of '96 



Shenan L. Wajda 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Elizabeth K. Walker 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Robert B. Walker 


Chris R.Wallace 


Kathleen B. Wallace 


;hool of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Psychology 


Environmental Geosciences 


Marketing 








Meridith L. Wallwork 

Arts & Sciences 
History 




Kellie A. Walsh 


Matthew D. Walsh 


Timothy P. Walsh 


Stacey A. Walthers 


James D. Ward 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Mangement 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Finance 


English 


Marketing 
Psychology 


Mathematics 

Seniors 427 





Laura L. Ward 


Matthew P.Ward 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Psychology 


Political Science 


Sociology 


French 







Patrick Ward 

Evening College 
Social Studies 



Yumitaro W. Watanabe 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Kimberly B. Watchmaker 

School of Mangement 
Human Resources Mgmt. 



Jason N. Webby 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Cheryl Ann Weber 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Michael T. Waring 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Erica L. Weber 

School of Management 
Finance 




William E. Weber 


Don S. Webster 


Heather D. Weed 


Jody L. Wenner 


Michael R. Wesolowski 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Psychology 


Marketing 
Environmental Studies 


Elem. Education/Early 
Childhood/ Child inSociety 


Biochemistry 


428 Class of 96 











Andrea M. Wessel 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



David P. Whalen 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Helen Marie Whitbread 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Spanish 



Jacqueline M. White 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kelley A. White 

Evening College 
English 




Rebecca L. Whitehurst 


Jeffrey P. Whitkens 


Sean D. Whitson 


Emily M. Wilcox 


James G. Willard II 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Sociology 


English 


Accounting 


History 


Information Systems 




Philosophy 








Kevin W. Wilier 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Michael S. Willet 

School of Management 
Finance 



Brett A. Williams 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Landen C. Williams 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Marcus P. Williams 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 




Mark D. Williams 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Renee L. Wisniski 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 



Alexander M. Wit 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Michael S. Wojkowski 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Melissa A. Wolf 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Seniors 429 



' A new moon leads me to 
worlds of dreams and I follow. 
A new world waits for me; my 
dream, my way. 

-Enya 




430 is of "96 




Seniors 431 




Hogan L.Wong 


Ingrid Wong 


Jennifer Wong 


Jennifer L. Wood 


Kristin M. Wood 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Finance 


Human Development 


Sociology 


Communications 


Finance 


Information Systems 








Marketing 




Christopher J. Woodard 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Kimberly A. Woodin 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Brian S. Woods 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Cristina M. Woods 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Keisha L. Wooten 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



432 Class of 96 



Jonathan L. Wright 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 



Sarah Wright 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Scott Wynne 

School of Management 
Finance 



Nicholas D. Xanthakos 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kenji Yamagata 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 




Diane Y. Yan 

School of Management 

Finance 
Information Systems 



Michelle A. Yap 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Fahmida M. Yasin 

School of Management 
Marketing 



Cindy K. Yee 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Kristen C. York 

Arts & Sciences 
English 




life 4 



David M. Young 


Jeffrey C. Youngquist 


Won J. Yu 


Jonathan M. Yusam 


Leze Zagreda 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Communications 


Economics 
Philosophy 


Marketing 


Psychology 




Erin E. Zagrubski 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Carolyn J. Zambelli 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Rebecca A. Zannini 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Deborah Zapolski 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Damon M. Zappacosta 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Seniors 433 



Alexander Zavratsky 

School of Management 
Finance 



Jennifer A. Zeinoun 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Carlos E. Zevallos Jr. 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 



Patrick Zilaro 

Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 



William E. Zima 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 




Anna Q. Zintl 


Bryan J. Zocco 


Richard G. Zoffinger 


Joseph C. Zucchero 


Eric S. Zupka 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


History 


English 
Communications 


Accounting 


Biology 


History 




Robin Flynn 


Hillary G. Leister 


John McDonough 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Marketing 


Secondary Education 
English 


Political Science 



434 Class of 96 




Seniors 435 







Class 0] 

Paulo Abu-Raya 


fl996 

Nathaniel Benally 


Abigail Cote Brown 






Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 






Economics 


Finance 


Nursing 






Elizabeth T. Akerley 


Kathleen Mary Blair 


Eileen P. Brown 






School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences- 






Secondary Education 


Communications 


English 






Spanish 


Vincent G. Blatney 


Farouk H. Brown 






Tania W. Al-Tahlawi 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 






School of Education 


Finance 


Sociology 






Elem. Ed./ Mod. Special Needs 










Math/Computer Science 


Matthew Blecha 

Arts & Sciences 


Shanna Bullock 

Arts &Sciences 






Joseph Michael Alden 


Economics 


Psychology 






Arts & Sciences 










Political Science 


Benedict A. Bodota 


Nicholas Buni 






History 


Arts & Sciences 
Biology 


Arts & Sciences 
English 






S. Jennifer Allen 










Arts & Sciences 


Stephen M Bourtin 


Lorraine T. Buschhoff 






Sociology 


Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 


Arts & Sciences 
History 






Gary Paul Amara 


History 








Arts & Sciences 




Ryan George Cable 






Psychology 


Audrey L. Bowersox 

School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 






Julie L. Ambler 


Elementary Education 








Arts & Sciences 


Child in Society 


Peter D. Callahan 






History 


Patrick Christian Bradley 


Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 






Janice M. Angeles 


Arts & Sciences 








Arts & Sciences 


Political Science 


Robert Emett Cambra 






English 


Communications 


Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 






Thomas Daly Ashe 


Shannon K. Bradley 








Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Kristin M. Canavan 






English 


Elementary Education 
English 


School of Education 
Early Childhood Education 






Michael Abraham Asseff 




Human Development 






School of Management 


Zackery A.C. Breen 








Accounting 


Arts & Sciences 


Jessica Capone 






Marketing 


Computer Science 


Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 






Edward Paul Baptiste 










Arts & Sciences 


Christopher M. Brennan 


Nibaldo J. Capote 






English 


Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 


School of Management 
Accounting 






Steven Joseph Bazyl 










Arts & Sciences 




Thomas P. Carpenter 






Computer Science 




Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 


436 


Class 


of 96 







Scott P. Carroll 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Susan M. Carroll 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 

Shannon M. Caulfield 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Cari Caulway 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Andrew J. Chandler 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 

Donald Reed Chase 

School of Management 
Finance 

Nisha Kishu Chatani 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Orlando Cherenek 

School of Management 
Finance 

Lisa Cherin 

Arts & Sciences 
Spanish 

John S. Chi 

School of Management 
Finance 

Hyun Bum Cho 

School of Management 
Economics 

Desmond C. Choong 

School of Management 
Finance 
English 



Peter R. Christensen 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Susan Marie Christian 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Doo-Jin Chung 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Chaney Edmund Cieck 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 

Marc A. Cima 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 

Heather Anne Clokey 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Clinton S. Coddington 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Jennifer L. Cole 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Stalin Colinet 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Michael A. Colleran 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Craig R. Collins 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Juan Concepcion 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

William A. Connelly 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Mathematics 



Richard K. Cooper 

School of Management 

Economics 

Info Systems 

Carlos A. Coutinho 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

Kristina E. Cristofoli 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

French 

Alvin D. Crocco 

Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 

Sean P. Cronin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Sean P. Crowley 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Philip M. Cziao 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

John M. Daley 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Bradley A. Daniels 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Lawrence K. De Meo 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 

Maria M. Delauri 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 

Djenann Devaris 

Arts & Sciences 
French 
History 



Cesare A. Di Cio 

School of Management 
Marketing 

David W. Dinardi 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Amy C. Dixon 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Cristina D. Domingues 

Arts & Scienecs 
Communications 

Shane D. Dooley 

School of Management 
Finance 

Ellen F. Dormitzer 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Ann Dotoli 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Renee Dubois 

School of Education 
Elementary Education 
Human Development 

Kyle M. Dunphy 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Khuong Duong 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

John Egan 

School of Management 
Finance 

Mouzaffar El-Ariss 

School of Management 
Economics 



Seniors 437 







Class c 

Tina G. Ellis 


)fl996 

Timothy E. Frangioso 


William T. Greene 






Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 






Commincations 


Mathematics 
Philosophy 


Chemistry 
Philosophy 






Kara Emerson 










Arts & Sciences 


Alina Fyros 


Palisa Guna-Kasem 






Music 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 






English 


Economics 


Economics 






James M. Falla 


Jacqueline M. Gecan 


Loemongga Hademasan 






Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 






Computer Science 


English 


Finance 






Barbara F. Feldstein 


Alexis C. Geier 


True X. Ha 






Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 






Spanish 


Sociology 


General Management 






Philosophy 


Biology 


Walter S. Hammond 






Anthony Ferrante 


Amy L. Gengler 


Arts & Sciences 






School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


History 






Accounting 


Economics 


Samer Hammoud 






Jonathan C. Ferrante 


Michael P. Gentile 


School of Management 






Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Economics 






Physics 


Finance 


Finance 






Timothy P. Fitzgibbons 


Katherine Giardi 


Stephen E. Handwerk 






Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 






Biology 


Secondary Education 
History 


Communications 






Rosemary E. Ford 




Charles M. Hannah 






Arts & Sciences 


Omar Gibson 


Arts & Sciences 






Communications 


Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 


Sociology 






Enrique M. Fortun 


Sociology 


Tara A. Hanratty 






School of Management 




Arts & Sciences 






Accounting 


Katherine M. Gilmore 

Arts & Sciences 


Communications 






Jennifer Fostel 


History 


John W. Higgins 






Arts & Sciences 




Arts & Sciences 






Art History 


Alberto Gonzalez-Gancedo 

Arts & Sciences 


English 






Jeffrey A. Fournier 


Computer Science 


Thomas A. Hohensee 






Arts & Sciences 




Arts & Sciences 






Biochemistry 


Alyssa C. Gotette 

School of Management 


Mathematics 






Hazel A. Franchette 


Accounting 


Napapan Hongladarom 






Arts & Sciences 




Arts & Sciences 






Sociology 


Kristin E. Gray 

School of Education 

Early Childhood/ Child in Society/ 

Elementary Education 


Economics 


438 


Class 


Df'96 







Eugene Y. Hsia 

School of Management 
Information Systems 

Min-Yin Huang 

Arts & Sciences 
Chemistry 

Randall J. Hutton 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 

Serina M. Imai 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Jason M. Insalaco 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Raffi Iskenderian 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Khalid Ismail 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Vanessa Jaszczerski 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Carly Jean Francois 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 

Marsha A. Jean Baptiste 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Jermaine K. Joseph 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Elizabeth A. Kaltofen 

Arts & Sciences 
French 

Sotirios S. Kanaras 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Richard W. Kane 

Arts & Sciences 
Geology 

Sopheap Khuon 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

Jane Kyong-Ja Kim 

Arts & Sciences 
Studio Art 

Sharon Kleinberg 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Christopher J. Knox 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Steven J. Knuesel 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

John G. Korsak 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 

Barbara G. Kougias 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 

Eric S. Koza 

School of Management 
Finance 

Todd S. Kraska 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Thomas M. Krentzin 

School of Management 
Economics 

Tae Yong Kyung 

Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Economics 



Gregg J. Lagambina 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Cara Lanza 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Glenn R. Lapointe 

School of Management 
Human Resource Management 

Marc R. Leduc 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 

Bernard Lee 

Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 
Computer Science 

Jin Woo Lee 

School of Management 
Finance 

Joseph H. Lee 

Arts & Sciences 

History 
Political Science 

Kuan You Lee 

School of Management 
Accounting 

Melinda L. Leight 

Arts & Sciences 
Biochemistry 

Juan P. Lopez 

Arts & Sciences 

Economics 
Computer Science 

Daniel K. Lotz 

Arts & Sciences 
History 



Carl E. Lovelace 

School of Management 

Finance 

Oper. & Strategic Mgmt. 

Economics 

Timothy J. Lowney 

Arts & Sciences 

English 
Communications 

William Luera 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Sciences 

Physics 

Ndumba Lutangu 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Joanna E. Lyma Young 

Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science 

Kevin Lynch 

Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

English 

Eileen A. Mac Kay 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 

Monica Kit Yee Mak 

School of Management 
Marketing 

Paul A. Margetis 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 

Amanda C. Martello 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Jessica Martin 

Arts & Sciences 
English 



Seniors 439 



: 







Class o 


fl996 








Lizabeth M. Martinez-Huet 


Shawina L. McLean 


Amy C. Napier 






Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 






History 


Psychology 


Accounting 






Aimee Marvin 


Tracey A. McNairn 


Elvi Yani Dewi Nasution 






Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 






Psychology 


Sociology 


Finance 






Kelly A. Mason 


Judith McPartlin 


Robyn Neitzschman 






Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 






Slavic Studies 


Political Science 


English 






Russian 


Kevin J. Meegan 


Vincent R. Nesi 






Scott R. Masse 


School of Management 


School of Management 






School of Management 


Accounting 


General Management 






Finance 










Accounting 


Creighton E. Mershon 

Arts & Sciences 


Jonathon B. Nettleton 

School of Management 






Megan C. Mastrandrea 


Communications 


General Management 






School of Nursing 


Sociology 








Nursing 


Ronald M. Minutello 


Diana L. Newkirk 

Arts & Sciences 






Andrea Mastrostefano 


Arts & Sciences 


English 






School of Management 


History 








Finance 


Zarak Mirza 


Matthew R. Newton 

Arts & Sciences 






Charles G. McCarthy 


School of Management 


English 






Arts & Sciences 


Economics 








English 




Richard Ng 






Spanish 


Antonio Molina Machargo 

School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 






Teri S. McCormick 


Finance 








School of Management 


Accounting 


Hoa T. Nguyen 






General Management 


Nicholas S. Mounier 


Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 






Robert J. McCready 


School of Management 








Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Mark A Nori 






Physics 


General Management 


Arts & Sciences 










English 




Colin P. McDermott 


Brian R. Moushegian 








School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Jonathon E. O'Brien 






History 


History 


Arts & Sciences 






Philosophy 


Political Science 


Biology 






Theresa J. McGovern 


Brian Murray 


George W. O'Connor 






School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 






Elementary Education 


Economics 


Marketing 






Human Development 


Kimberly A. Murray 


James E. ODonnell 






Joshua D. Mclnerney 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 






Arts & Sciences 


Nursing 


Finance 






Political Science 






440 


Class 


Df'96 







Stephen F. O'Neill 

Arts & Sciences 
Mathematics 

Jeremy Ojerholm 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 

Mark Omura 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Lisa A. Orlando 

Arts & Sciences 
Environmental Geoscience 

Margarita Papstafidas 

Arts & Sciences 
Communications 

Kipuda S. Park 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Michael P. Paska 

School of Managemenr 
Information Systems 

Alexander Pavlovich 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Elizabeth C. Perkins 

Arts & Sciences 

English 

Economics 

Linen J. Pok 

Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 

Melissa J. Previdi 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Gary M. Prodanas 

Arts & Sciences 
Biology 

Jason M. Purcell 

Arts & Sciences 
Philosophy 



Jack H. Pytel 

School of Education 
Human Development 

Mika O. Pyyhkala 

School of Management 

Human Resource Management 

Marketing 

David F. Quinn 

Arts & Sciences 
Economics 
Philosophy 

Kimberly A. Quinn 

School of Management 
Accounting 
Marketing 

Kimberly S. Rabold 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

English 

Dustin B. Rawlin 

Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 

Brian P. Redding 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 

Katherine M. Riddel) 

School of Management 
Human Resource Management 

Eliot Roberts 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Kristen Roberts 

Arts & Sciences 
History 

Holeen C. Rodrigues 

School of Management 
Accounting 



Domingo A. Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 

Michelle L. Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 
English 

Rafael R. Rodriguez 

Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 
Communications 



Chadwick Schroeder 

Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science 

English 

Robert M. Scott 

Arts & Sciences 
Sociology 

Scott A. Seremet 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



William D. Rodriguez 


Jennifer B. Sexton 


School of Management 


School of Education 


Marketing 


Secondary Education 




English 


Juan F. Rosas 




School of Management 


Melissa M. Seyfried 


General Management 


Arts & Sciences 




Sociology 


Kerri D. Russo 




Arts & Sciences 


Sara Callas Seymour 


Biology 


Arts & Sciences 




Art History 


James A. Ryan 




Arts & Sciences 


Matthew C. Sharp 


Economics 


Arts & Sciences 




English 


Timothy M. Ryan 


Philosophy 


Arts & Sciences 




Mathematics 


Beth A. Signori 


Economics 


Arts & Sciences 




Communication 


Marc Saccardo 




Arts & Sciences 


Aryo H. Soegiarso 


Finance 


Arts & Sciences 




Economics 


Virginia C. Saino 


Studio Art 


School of Management 




Finance 


Julissa Y. Soriano 




Arts & Sciences 


Dana M. Santangelo 


Mathematics 


School of Management 




Marketing 


Elias T. Spiliotis 




Arts & Sciences 


Christine Schmitt 


Biology 


Arts & Sciences 




English 


Melissa R. St Hilaire 




Arts & Sciences 




Independent 




Seniors 441 



David St. Martin 


Raymond Teng 


Nelson A. Vega 


Vincent Visceglia 


School of Education 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


Secondary Education 


Finance 


Psychology 


Sociology 


Mathematics 










Hai Hong Truong 


Christopher Verola 


Maureen Walsh 


Megan K. Storz 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Marketing 


Finance 


Biochemistry 


Marketing 


Accounting 










Elvira Valerio 


Sarah Vincent 


Paula S. Walsh 


Eron Sunando 


School of Management 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Management 


Marketing 


Sociology 


Finance 


Operation & Strategic Management 




Philosophy 






Dennis Vasquez 




John Wassenaar 


Kelly A. Tector 


Arts & Sciences 


Lmani S. Viney 


School of Management 


School of Nursing 


Psychology 


Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Nursing 




History 





TOP TEN 

Favorite Freshman Memory... 

10. "Scappy's." - Ignacio B43 
9. "Flooding the Hall Director's room while using soap and 

water to slide down the hall." -Travis Stewart 
8. "Lucky Johnny's... Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday..." 

- Yola Urbanski 

7. "Pulling the fire alarm." -Anonymous 

6. "Scorpion Bowling at Taiwan." -Nancy Marshall 

5. "My roommate showering in her underwear." -Anonymous 

4. "2nd semester sabbatical, the jeep, the Golden Lantern." 

Mary Ann McLaughlin 

3. "Locking myself out of my dorm at 3am."-Anonymous 

2. "Bush diving in front of St. Ignatius." -Anonymous 

1. "Scappy's, Scappy's, Scappy's..." -Mick McCreesh 



442 Class of '96 



Kenyatta Watson 


Leslie A. Wilkerson 


Elisabeth A. Ziehy 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Communications 


Psychology 


Nursing 


Mark F. Wenger 


Patricia Williams 




Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 




Computer Science 


Nursing 




Ibetthe L. Wesley 


John E. Wood 




School of Education 


Arts & Sciences 




Human Development 


Biology 
Theatre Arts 




Sean K. Wilder 






Arts & Sciences 


Khabirah Yahya 




English 


Arts & Sciences 





Biology 



TOP TEN 

The best food at BC... 

10. "Jello shots." -Kevin McCarthy 

9. "Egg McBC & home fries." -Mike Goldberg 

8. "Chicken sandwiches with mayo under heat lamps from 

Walsh Dining Hall." -Scott Tower 

7. "The 'Billy Curley!'" -Steve Berasi 

6. "The watery spaghetti sauce from Addie's." -Jyoti Mahapatra 

5. "Chicken stir fry with cheese of course!" -Lynn Damigella 

4. "Coffee from Dunkin' Donuts. "-Yearbook Editors 

3. "Make your own stir fry night." -Dave Elsaesser 

2. "The chicken that spurts out butter when you put a fork in 

it." -Tim Golier 
1. "No such thing." -Anonymous 



Seniors 443 



TOP TEN 

The worst lie told at BC... 

10. "I'm sterile." -Ignacio B43 

9. "No, really I like him for his personality." -Suzanne Geden 

8. "Yeah, I've gone on a zillion dates at BC." -Anonymous 

7. "I'm straight." -Anonymous 

6. "I can't... I have baseball practice." -Rich Dilorio 

5. "I don't have a girlfriend." -Mod 34B 

4. "Well, Professor, your class is my favorite..."- Anonymous 

3. "I know how to work computers." -Anonymous 

2. "That the 40-stitch scar on my leg was the result of a blue 

shark attack." -Kim Cressy 
1. "I'll call you." -Ignacio B43 




444 Class of '96 




TOP TEN 

When I think of Mary Ann's... 

10. "Gilligan's Island." -Peter Berlinghoff 

9. "The stench of wine." -Ginny Saino 

8. "Friends in Low Places" -Garth Brooks 

7. "Unique smell, lines to Dunkin' Donuts, to see a few friends & 

talk about how we'll never go there again." -Carrie Cerullo 

6. "The 'Reservoir Dogs'- you know who you are."- Tom Gallagher 

5. "How bad your clothes smell the next morning." -Mike Nolman 

4. "A water hose, detergent, and a mop." -John Boyt 

3. "250 people trying to communicate over Pearl Jam's "Better 

Man" as the townie at the comer sips his beer." -Anna Pizzaro 

2. "The hospitable staff, wide liquor selection, fine dining, 

and a warm atmosphere." -Colin Earnst 

1. "The kind of smell that won't wash out of your hair." 

-Catherine Copeland 



Seniors 445 



TOP TEN 

The greatest tailgating memory... 

10. "I have never tailgated." -Brian O'Connor 

9. "Shea Field in the mud." -Anonymous 

8. "Reminiscing with friends." -Melissa Hogan 

7. "A certain young man dressed as an executioner chanting 

'Die Lou' before Notre Dame." -Anonymous 

6. "Yeah, I have one. I just don't remember." -Carl Brugnoli 

5. "Notre Dame in the rain, the cold, the mud... under the 

watchful eye of the Velvet Jesus." -Tony Lucarelli 

4. "The trials and tribulations of the Shasta."-Mods 22B &11B 

3. "I think I was on the field..." -Matt Conine 

2. "Rushing the field." -Anonymous 

1. "I don't remember." -Brian Linnihan 




446 Class of '96 




TOP TEN 

Most embarrassing moment at BC... 

10. "When the guys in 22B did a panty raid." -Lisa Wadland 

9. "Tripping up Higgins stairs." -Anonymous 
8. "Ditching a cab and running into a tree on the getaway." - 

Ignacio B41 

7. "Father Monan asking me, 'So what's up with the skirts?' when I 

wore a kilt to Breaking the Barriers." -Andrew Fellingham 

6. "Doing the walk of shame." -Anonymous 

5. "Falling asleep in class." -Anonymous 

4. "Drinking tequila shots to build confidence; then throwing up on 

the girl I wanted to impress." -Mike "Rock" Veroudakis 

3. 'Being made to dress as a clown & sing, 'Ifyou want my body, and 

you think I'm sexy' in the dining hall at dinner-time." -Lara Farrell 

2. "Peeing on myself." -Dave Elsaesser 

1. "When a friend let me walk through Stuart with a tampax 

pad stuck to my back." -Mike Hofman 



Seniors 447 



— — ^^™ 



Sfr7/ rotmd the corner there 
may wait, a new road, or a 
secret gate." 

-J.R.R. Tolkien 























































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448 I ass of '96 




Seniors 449 



TOP TEN 

/ want to be remembered at BC as... 

10. "Drunk."- Anonymous 
9. "Fun loving, friendly, happy, and accident prone." -Kerri 

Gallagher 
8. "I just want someone to remember who I am!" -Kate Lacoste 

7. "Laid back." -Tom Hobbs 

6. "Laughing! ! !" -Lara Farrell 

5. "As the one who got hit in the head with the goalposts after 

we won the ND game." -Anonymous 
4. "As the girl with the cool accent." -Annemarie Riley 
3. "As starting the 11:00 screams one night during exam 

week." -Anonymous 

2. "Conscious and standing." -John Drew 

1. "Naked." -Dave Von Klemperer 




450 Class of '96 




TOP TEN 

The #1 reason to attend EC... 

10. "Because each year they get closer and closer to 
perfection... maybe next year they'll get it right!" 

-Tiffany Preston 

9. "To live in the Mods." -Kevin Clarke 

8. "To buy a Sub Turri Yearbook." -Yearbook Staff 

7. "Hot blondes." -Mod 34B 

6. "Athletic Events- the whole school comes together!" 

-Steve Ialuna 

5. "The dating scene." -Annemarie Riley 

4. "To build your tolerance." -JoeyDeMeo 

3. "UGBC Pub Series." -Kevin Clarke 

2. "Weekly meetings with Father Monan." -Ryan King 

1. "The Unicorn Man." -Anonymous 



Seniors 451 



TOP TEN 

The BC fight song should be... 

10. " 'Sympathy of Destruction' by Megadeath." -Keg John Burn 
9. "Oh what a feelin... we're dancin' on the ceiling." 

-Lionel Richie 
8. "If winning or losing doesn't matter, why play the game?" - 

Reyhan Ali 

7. " 'Come out and play' by the Offspring."- Tom Hobbs 

6. "Beer, beer, beer, beer..."- Carl Brugnoli 

5. "99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall."- Anonymous 

4. " 'If You Can't Be With the One You Love, Love the One 

You're With' by CCR." -Anonymous 

3. " 'I Will Survive' by Gloria Gaynor."- Brandi Stemerman 

2. " 'Cult of Personality' by Living Color."- Annemarie Riley 

1 . "For Boston."- Anonymous 



















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452 Class of 96 




TOP TEN 

After Graduation, Vll be doing this... 

10. "Picking up cans in the Mods." -Tom Gallagher 

9. "A bouncer at the Kells."- Kevin McCarthy 

8. "Lying on a beach being fanned by my harem of 1,000 

husbands." -Suzanne Geden 

7. "Reminiscing about that trip to Notre Dame."- Anonymous 

6. "Spraying Mike Sacco with a fire extinguisher." -Ignacio B43 

5. "I was hoping to red shirt my senior year and come back 

again."- Diane Galiano 

4. "Getting paid to surf. "Tom Hobbs 

3. "Joining a Lithuanian circus." -Jay Ryan 

2. "Going back to Europe. "-Kathy Dwyer 

1. "Right now I'm just concentrating on graduating." - 

Anonymous 



Seniors 453 



TOP TEN 

When I hear "BC" I think... 

10. "Bottles and Cans." - Lisa Ronzoni 

9. "Awesome Roomates!"- Tina Gustafson 

8. "Work hard, play hard."- Karen McKeon 

7. "Chi-Chi!"- Karima Hassan 

6. "Boston College." -Colin Earnst 

5. "People-watching in the Eagle's Nest." -Mike Hofman 

4. "Greed."-Mod 34B 

3. "Good friends."- Heather McGuire 

2. "Bocci Ball."-Jay Ryan 

1. "Lost in College." -Anonymous 





v^ Jk 



454 Class of 96 




TOP TEN 

At our 10 year reunion, I'll be... 

10. "Bald and fat." -Anonymous 
9. "Everything I did as an undergrad, and hopefully more." 

Julie DeMatteo 
8. "Leaving for Mary Ann's at about 11:15pm." -Colin 

Earnst 

7. "Homeless."- Anonymous 

6. "Running from Jen Dawson (joke!)" -John Dempsey 

5. "Avoiding it."- Jay Ryan 

4. "Graduating" -Anonymous 

3. "Hopefully not fixing my hairpiece."- Mike Hofman 

2. "Living off the royalties from my second best-seller." 

-Steve Ialuna 
1. "Checking out of rehab." -Mod 34B 



Seniors 455 






"You have brains in your head. You have 
feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself 
any direction you choose. You're on your 
own. And you know what you know. And 
you're the guy who'll decide where to go... 




456 



Class 



of 96 




And will you succeed? Yes! You will, indeed! 
98 and 3/4 percent guaranteed!" 

-Dr. Seuss 



Seniors 457 



A Tribute to J. Donald Monan, S.J.... 

President of Boston College, 1973-1996 




"I expect to pass through 
this world but once. Any 
good therefore that I can do, 
or any kindness that I can 
show to my fellow-creature, 
let me do it now. Let me not 
defer or neglect it, for I shall 
not pass this way again. 

-Attributed to Stephen Gilbert 



JET Commercial Photographers 



458 Fr. Monan Tribute 



Photos Courtesy of University Archives 



Top/Bottom, Left/right: 

Father Monan at his desk, 1979 
Playing golf with Bob Hope, 1980 

At this year's tree lighting, 1995 
With George Bush at Commeneement. 
Lacing iee skates, no date 
With Sen. Edward Kennedy, 1975 




Fr. Monan Tribute 459 



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Dr. £ Jlirs. 9rineo J . 9lcacio 

frames, j. £ Gleanor S 91/1/ 

JliarA £ Ualerie 9lndreotta 

Dr. £ Jlirs. j. CRooert 9tnti2ona 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. Sflenn 9louama 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. Gonstantino 9trgimon 

JlCaureen Jvgan 9lrrouo 

jane JSaAer 

jim £ JliartglDou 9)annon 

JKr. £ Jlirs. Ornest 9. 93artof 

9tioert £ janan 1/3 at en - J arents ofuvooert Jjaten 

SJeorge £ 9eresa 93enedetto 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. U\onaio iP. 93ertasi 

9om £ loee JJreen-Gassidg 

J\ooert £ Gat/ierine JJrooAs 

JliarA 91. Jjruno 

Drs. jorge £ Gormen 9Jruno 

jheofa /jintf 9)ryant 

Ioe9\oiJ £ J atricia 9) u fieri 

9Caren £ james JJurc/ietta 

Darlene 9). Gampoeff 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. 9ioerio Garreiro 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. jonn Cjassesse 

tBinda S. £ 9/iifip 91. GAiapman 999 

Jbee 9v. £ Suzanne /?. Go/e 

Daniel £ J atricia Go fey 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. JJarrg Jli. Gonneff 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. Jliorgan j. Gosteffo 

Glare £ Jjill Gumoerfand 

9ne Gurtin 9amily 



Uincent £ Jliary J) J 9lmico 

Dr. £ Jlirs. james G Dau, jr. 

JliartJ 9lnne Day 

(d). Gtepnen Dennis 9amify 

Go ward £ Jvita DeGantis 

S/eraldine £ 9om Deuers 

Virginia Jli. DiJliattia 

JKr. £ JlCrs. 9Ceuin 9- Dononue - 9Srendan '96 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. 9vaymond 9. Duane 

Jliicnaef 9 Dunn 

Jlir. Jliitsuzo Goisawa 

Dr. £ Jlirs. O. 9fetcner Ouster 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. 9nomas 9aneg 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. 9tntliony 9andetti 

joefjlt. 9ef<fstein, 9eresa 9efcfstein 

tfanet £ 9lndrew U. 9effingnam 

(SJendeff £ DCancy 9erguson 

9lngefo o. 9errante 

Dr. £ Jlirs. 9°& n a- 9inn 

Dr. £ Jlirs. Go ward 9itzpatricA 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. 9rederic S 9riedman 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. loouis S^agliano 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. 9\icnardD. 9ainer 

Dr. jaime £ Jlirs. 9fifda Sfaliano 

Gandra 9°y ce 9affen 

(OJayne G 9erft £ Gfaine D. 9erft 

9lntnony cj. zJiacona £ Patricia 91. 9lanagan- 

SJiacona 

9efix &. £ 9lnnie 9. 9iff 

Isliffiam &. SJiffmore £ &udit£9l. Pfounde 

Dr. £ Jltrs. PaufS. 9odfrey 

Gdwina £ JliarA Granada 



<460 Gold Benefactors 



Dauia £ ^Angela Grande 

Jltr. £ Jltrs. Uincent ^rippo 

Jltr. £ MLrs. Jvooert Jit. SPu/AocvsAi 

Jltr. £ Jltrs. CitanletJ j. SJutAowsJii 

rfonn £ jeanne SJuttman 
Jltr. £ MLrs. Is). Douglas Jiajfar 

-Jinaelica £ U\,oss JluaJies 

Jlir. £ MLrs. Uimo/ny (S). JiuaJies 

S^eoraia S/nsalaco 

Jvooolfo rfaramjllo 

Dr. £ MLrs. <uamuel juliao 

jonann £ Gatnerine JKeil 

mXt. £ Jltrs. DtussettD. JCeil, $r. 

JlticAaelg. JCetty 

SJuan £ Biuia jCij'ac 

JSod £ JKatnu JKina 

Mir. £ MLrs. Bes/er JKiss 

iRooert Jlleuen 

Gnarles £ ^Ulice Jlnott 

^Acnim £ J auline JJCnusf 

Jlir. £ Mirs. (fonn JKoAoszAa 

Drs. jang £ JCerissa JKonginong 

'dor £ ^nnn Jltarie Baoeiio, Dr. <?onn 7). Baaeito 

Jltr. £ Jltrs. 9?o£ertl3). Batty 

Gamilla £ <^)/ewart Bee 

Dr. £ Mirs. Jfernan Beon 

Olizaoe/A £ Jltorion Beuy 

JferSeri G £ Diane 7). BieDmann JS1U 

<uam £ Sherry Bongo 

Dauia £ <busie Bouejog 

josepn £ Uneresa Byman 

Dr. £ Jltrs. Is). J 3 . Jltagee 



games Ij. Jltalpeso, Jlt.D. 
Mir. £ Mirs. josepn J{. Jltaluinni 

JCicA £ (J la a Jltananan 

Mir. £ Jltrs. J atric/i Jltaranielte 

^nntnonu S Jltassoua 

Dauia £ Jltura Jltatsumoto 

Mir. £ Mirs. jonn JltcGaffrea 

Dr. £ Mirs. Ureuor Jltc ^ill 

Jrancine £ James Mic^onigle 

Dr. £ Mirs. OowaroD. JltcBaugnlin 

Sandra ^inareas JltcJlturtrie 

Mir. £ Mirs. James ^A. Mic<b£ane 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. Cjowara j. Jlterriam 

Mir. £ Mirs. Jltaruin o. Miicnefman 

Jne Jltialiero Jamily 

Dr. £ Jltrs. $o£n T. JltilAauer 

Dr. £ Jlirs. Ornes/ Carl Jliiricn 

Donald £ t^helley JliooreJieao 

Jltr. £ mXts. CPeier J 7 . JTCorgan, $r. 

Jltr. £ Jltrs. $o£n JX. JKouni 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. Unomas Jit. JltulcaJiu 

John £ Jltarie JltuttarAey 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. Uincent l/l. Jlturray, Jr. 

Jltr. £ Jltrs. Islittiam $. DCac/eau 

Drs. JCa/iio £ JCnasc/iayar Jx-ainzaaeJi 

Dr. £ Jlirs. Jienry JCasrallaA 

Jloracio O. Jtaoarre/e 

TJinceni £ Baurie JCesi 

Jlir. £ Jlirs. O. Jtos/rame 

Cc/warJ^. O'Brien, Jr., Jlt.D. <63 

Jltr. £ Jltrs. CRo6ertD. O'JSrien 

Garol £ Dennis O'Docuo 



Gold Benefactors 461 



JKr. & JKrs. Sam U. OA 

Dr. £ JKrs. Oomuno J~f. Olson 

JKr. £ JKrs. games 91. O'DCe/ff £ Ramify 

H3o6 £ Fa/ Overfly 

9//y. £ JKrs. 0?o6ertg. O'Saff/oan 

Dr. £ JKrs. Gray JC 0/a 

JKr. £ JKrs. Uvicnard \Jl. iPaqfiari 

Cjileen £ SrranA J aparteas 

go£n £. £ JCatJifeen G CPaffen 

JKi/cnefl £ Susan [Pear/man 

Jvoaer £ JKirella LPe/rucceffi 

J eter £ SPa/I LPian/an/cfa 

games &. £ jGoi's J^inAin 

Drs. Gesar £ Ouanqeline CPizarro 

gosepA g. £ Gecyfia g. CProAosAi 

Mir. £ JKrs. &Jward CP. Quinn 

cfosepn £ LDucille LRaia 

JKr. £ JKrs. SJeorqe /3. CRisSano 

Garlos £ guanita J\oorjquez 

Dr. £ Mirs. JKax O. UvoJriquez 

JKr. £ JKrs. 9?o£ert&. CRot£ 

Unomas Ijt. Lftyan, gr. '63 



JKarqe Sammi's 

JKr. £ JKrs. ^J.j. ScAaefer 

JKr. £ JKrs. (S)illiam Ji. ScAirmanq 

Dr. £ JKrs. S/epAen g. Scully 

Dr. £ JKrs. /oui's SirotzAu 

JKrs. JKartJ S7. Sm/'/A 

JKr. £ JKrs. UimotAu Jo. Sweeney 

Une \JamanaAis Lramuq 

Jjoo £ (fane -Jnomaier 

JKr. £ JKrs. Steven G UAomas 

Samson £ goan Uinq 

JKaria £ ^aoe Uroiano 

Diane £ [JranA Qlttaro 

JKr. £ JKrs. (fonn Uafentino 

Dr. £ JKrs. jKicAaefg. VefsmiJ 

g. TAiAp £ Garofe WaAAers 

Dr. £ JKrs. Is). Wassenaar 

JKar/in £ ^Anne Js)efcA 

JKr. £ JKrs. WAAam CR JsJAafen 

JKr. £ JKrs. CRobert G Woods 

JKr. £ JKrs. youn~Jffwan TJu 

AAie Ai. juacnarias Uram/Iu 



462 Gold Benefactors 



SVI/L V E 



FACTOR 



Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Andrighetto 
Mr. & Mrs. Roy Armstrong 

Fred & Barbara Baker 

Git a & Jitendra K. Baruah 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred N. Basilicato 

Mr. & Mrs. William Bedard 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Belotti, Jr. 

Tom & Pat Bender 

Dr. & Mrs. Francis T. Bergin, Jr. 

Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Bikowski 

James F. Blanchette 

The Bodkin Family 

Charles & Dolores Bradley 

Carolyn Browne 

Judith Burgess 

Paul & Maureen Cacioppo 

John & Pam Carroll 

Dr. & Mrs. Jaime E. Chamorro 

Mr. & Mrs. John A. Christen 

Richard & Elizabeth Ciappa 

Catherine Clark 

Ray & Ruth Clough 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry Clune 

Frank & Jill Colandrea 

Dr. & Mrs. Michael A. Consiglio 

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest A. Cote 

Patricia & Michael Cox 

Sandra M. Cur ley 

Walter & Eva Cziao 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Damigella 

Vincent A. D'Angelo 

Michael & Nancy DelPriore 

Bob & Emily DeSantis 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter J. Dorgan, Jr. 

Gary & Suzanne Dornbush 

Dr. & Mrs. Henry W. Drozdowski 

Mr. & Mrs. John V Dwyer, Jr. 

William C. Dyer 

Dr. & Mrs. Stephen T. Earls 

The Eddings Family 

Dale & Julie Fage 

Frank & Trish Faggiano 



Jack & Jean Far r icy 

Dr. & Mrs. David S. Field 

Val & Malinda Fiorita 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Fitzpatrick 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Florek 

Mary Franklin 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward M. Fogarty 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Gallagher 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Galletly 

Dr. & Mrs. Jorge Ganson 

Dr. & Mrs. Wilson J. Garcia 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Garofalo 

Diane & Joe Gasparrini 
David T & Patricia M. Gay 

Dawn & Bernie George 

Charles & Sallyanne Goodale 

William F. & Mary Jane Goodrick 

John & Geraldine Gray 

Mitch & Phyllis Gregorski 

Mr. & Mrs. Gary C. Greve 

Jeanne & Arthur Grubert 

Louis & MaryAnn Gubitosi 

Ved & Chitra Gupta, M.D.s 

Mr. & Mrs. Roland Gwiazdoski 

Ann E. Hanson 

Robert L. Harvey 

Dick & Ellie Healey 

Mr. & Mrs. Maurice Healy 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald P. Heffernan 

Elaine M. Hegerich 

Michael & Penny Herlihy 

Jane & Dan Hickey & Family 

Norman & Cheryl Howarth 

John & Karen Jensen 

Mr. & Mrs. John W. Johnston 

Paul J. & Rose-Marie Kaczor 

Mr. & Mrs. William A. Kane 

William J. Keane, Jr. 

Richard & Pamela Kehoe 

Mr. & Mrs. William & Mary Kelley 

Mr. & Mrs. Jack Kochian 

Mr. & Mrs. Tyrus Krigbaum 



Silver Benefactors 463 



I t'V E R 



BEN 



FACTORS 



David W. Krueger, M.D., Vicki Krueger 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Lagana 

Dr. Gregoria Lagrimas-Vasquez 

Mr. & Mrs. James Lamore 

Dr. & Mrs. Laurance C. Lee 

Gerald & Rose Linnihan 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent M. Lorusso 

Helen & Jim Lynch 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis Macchi 

Dr. & Mrs. William H. Macey 

Dr. & Mrs. John F. Mahoney 

Steve & Carol Malzone 

Peter & Kent Manahan, P'92, P'96, P'99 

Dennis & Kathy Manning 

Jean & DeWayn Marzagalli 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Maser 

Brian & Gail McCabe 

Laurie E. & William A. McCarthy 

Dennis McClure 

Jean & Joe McKeigue 

Mr. & Mrs. Mark A. McKinley 

Mr. & Mrs. R. Bruce McLane, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward M. McNally 

John N. McVey 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Menendez 

Drs. Lois & Mario Mignone 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Miller 

Doug & Candi Moreland 

John M. & Susan C. Mulcahy 

Dr. & Mrs. John J. Mulcahy 

Frank & Eileen Mullen 

Mark & Trish Mulvoy 

The Nakagawa Family 

Craig & Barbara Nelson 

Thomas F. O'Connor 

Mr. & Mrs. Massie Odiotti 

Dr. & Mrs. Frank A. Odium 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. O'Donnell 

Dr. Thomas & Mary Ann Okner - Class of '71 

Tom & Sally O 'Leary 

David & Joan Olson 

James & Donna Orland 

Melody & 
1464 Silver Benefactors 



George & Joanne 'Shea 

Henri & Molly Ouellette 

Thomas & Barbara Pazaras 

Lawrence & Nancy Peters 

Mr. & Mrs. S. Piccione 

Joseph M. & Lulu C Quitasol 

Dr. & Mrs. Warlito Ragasa & Family 

Mr. & Mrs. H. David Ramm 

Rich & Gail Robinson 

Richard & Pamela Rolston 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Ronzoni 

Mr. & Mrs. W. Greg Ryberg 

Wm. R. & Sharon E. Sampson 

Kate Sawyer 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Scaring 

Kay & Bruce Schneider 

The Separ Family 

Dr. & Mrs. Walter R. Shaghalian 

Alfred & Sandra Silva 

Dr. & Mrs. C. Paul Spinale 

Philip & Barbara Squitieri 

Wilfredo Carl Sta. Ana 

Mr. & Mrs. Demetruis N. Stellakis 

William & Jean Stewart 

Richard A. & Joanna A. Stillwagon 

Christine & Matthew Suffoletto 

Suzanne & Brian Swift 

Re & Peter Telep 

Mr. & Mrs. Terence P. Toal 

Katherine & Ted Tornehl 

Mr. & Mrs. Larry Tuminello 

Jim, Terry, Steve, Lisa & Cindy Valentine 

Ralph & Barbara Vivo 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry W. Voccola 

Mr. & Mrs. James M. Weiss 

Florie & Peter Welch 

Frank & Judy Wenner 

Michael & Christine Whelan 

Rosemary A. Wildfire 
Michael & Kathleen Willett 

James & Jane Wiltz 
Dr. & Mrs. Kenneth Wyneski 
Ernie Zima 



PATRONS 



Mr. & Mrs. John Abate 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent J. Adorno 

Claire A. Aldrich 

Dr. M. Ebadat All, M.D. 

Frank & Suzanne Alioto 

The Amore Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Anderson 

Dr. & Mrs. David J. Angus 

Marco & LouAnn Arquilla 

Warren & Sandra Bacon 

Mrs. Young-Ae Baek 

Mr. & Mrs. C. Bannerman 

Mr. & Mrs. John G. Barbeau 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Barbieri 

Andrew & Deana Barna 

Gabrielle Davis Barrett 

Mr. & Mrs. Alejandro M. Banning 

Elizabeth & Frank Bates 

Hugh & Christine Beagan 

Barbara T. Bednarz 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter D. Beekman 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Benedict 

Steven & Sharon Berg 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent M. Bettes 

David & Terry Bieber 

Carlisle & Sandra Bindoo 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond M. Borthwick 

Mr. & Mrs. Bernard F. Boyle 

Barbara Bradley & Kenneth E. Bradley 

Mrs. Linda K. Brady 

Richard & Barbara Brady 

Jim, Maureen, & Kim Brennan 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur S. Bresnahan 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Bridge 

Ted & Rosemary Brown 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Bruckner 

Mr. Carl & Dr. Donna Brugnoli 

The Bryan-Letzring Family 

Jerry & Pat Buckley 

Virginia Budka 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth E. Bunge 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Buonaspina 

William & Jean Burke 
Arthur Burnap & Mary Feldhaus 

Art & Trini Bustria 

Doctor & Mrs. Nagi J. Bustros 

Robert L. Bykowski 

Roy & Rachel Cameron 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Campobasso 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Caporrino 



Mr. & Mrs. Jeremiah J. Cardamone 

Charles & Eleanor Carr 

Marie & Anthony Carrino 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Caulway 

Mr. & Mrs. James D. Cavallo 

The Chodkowski Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Ciampi 

Maj. Gen. Drennan A. Clark 

The David F. Clune Family 

Joseph & Maria Coccaro 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank D. Colagiovanni 

Judy & Hill Colbert 

Mary P. Cole 

Dr. & Mrs. John Concannon 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Cooney, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph E. Cooney 

Jeanne & Gene Cornell 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph G. Cosgrove 

Mr. & Mrs. Alexander J. Cote 

Ralph & Joan Cozza 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Cronin 

Mr. & Mrs. William A. Czech 

Mr. & Mrs. Jon Daly 

Mr. & Mrs. Gary Darzano 

Dr. & Mrs. Jagannath Das 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter F. Davey 

Dr. Dennis & Grace Dawgert 

Joseph M. Days 

Alan & MaryLou DeBisschop 

John & Diana Dell 

Helga & Tiny DeMelo 

David & Kathleen K. DeMeo 

Stephen C. Demianczyk 

Mr. & Mrs. James DeRonck 

Parents of Michael R. DeRosa 

John & Doris Desmond & Family 

Jim & Barbara Devlin 

Mr. & Mrs. John DiBacco 

Frank & Julia DiMaio 

Marty & Jim Doherty 

Michael & Elizabeth Donahue 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Donley 

Mr. & Mrs. E. Dopf 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter K. Doyle 

Mr. & Mrs. D.J. Drage 

John & Kathy Drew 

John & Susan Droskoski 

Mr. & Mrs. William D. Earnst 

Peter H. Eberle 

Richard & Mary Egan 



Patrons 465' 



PATjRONS 



James & Debra Ruel 

Dr. & Mrs. James Sachtjen 

Catharine B. Saelinger 

Dr. & Mrs. Peter Sakalowsky, Sr. 

Anthony & Rosemarie Salina 

Mr. & Mrs. David J. Sambora 

Dr. & Mrs. Randall Scagliotti 

T. Carl & Heidrun Schietinger 

Bill & Kathy Schoeffield 

Dr. & Mrs. G. Philip Scott 

Mr. & Mrs. Rene Scutt 

Karen A. Sekula 

Gordon & JoAnn Shaffner 

Tom & Susan Sharkey 

Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey E. Shuler 

Diane C. Sieminski 

Cheryl & Ted Smith 

Lloyd & Brenda Solomon 

Frank & Amy Spaulding 

Kathleen Spellman 
George & Suzanne Stack 
Mr. & Mrs. Bud Stafford 

George Stagno 
Marianne & Phil Stephan 



Mr. & Mrs. Richard H. Sutphin 

Mr.& Mrs. Leonard M. Szczesny 

Joslyn & Renato Te 

Carol & Kevin Thomas 

Mr. & Mrs. William E. Thonn 

Mary Ann & Charles Tlucek 

John & Kathleen Tubman 

Mrs. Pauline J. Tumminia 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Turek 

Art & Michelle Tower 

Rachel G. Trudel 

John & Cordelia Varoudakis 

Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Walker 
Mr. & Mrs. Patrick J. Walsh 

Tom & Carol Ward 
Mr. & Mrs. Nagy T. Webby 
William & Susanne Weber 

Mrs. John A. Weed 
Thomas & Susan Whitehurst 

Scott & Susan Wilfong 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Gordon Willard 

Lawrence & Mau Wolfe 

Ken & Susan Woodard 

Robert L. & Bernadette Young 



Edward & Rosemary Zapolski 



The Staff of Sub Turri, the Yearbook of Boston College, 

would like to extend its thanks, gratitude, and appreciation to 
the parents, families, friends, faculty members, and alumni who 

contributed to the 1996 Sub Turri. Your donations as 
benefactors, and patrons, have helped to make the production 

of this book possible. 

Thank You. 



466 Patrons 



JOSTENS, Inc. 



Would like to congratulate Sub Turn's graduating Seniors: 

Mary Bannerman 

Patricia Bourke 

Tara Bui 

Jim Faletra 

Lara Farrell 

Susan Iacono 

Adilia Lugo 

Kristen Nygaard 

Kim Reisinger 

Annmarie Riley 



Ads 467 



Congratulations 

and 

Best Wishes 

to the 

Boston College 

Class of 1996. 



CARL WOLF STUDIO, Inc. 

OFFICIAL YEARBOOK PHOTOGRAPHERS 



401 Elmwood Avenue 

Elmwood Court One 

Sharon Hill, PA 19079 



1-800-969-1338 



468 Advertisers 





Congratulations to the Class of 1996! 
from 

THE BOSTON COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Keep us up to date on your address so we can keep you in 
touch with your friends and classmates. 



825 Centre Street 

Newton, MA 02158 

(617) 552-4700 or (800) 669-8430 



Advertisers 469 



Congratulations 

and 

Best Wishes 

to the 

Boston College 

Class of 1996. 

from 

SUB TURRI 

THE YEARBOOK OF BOSTON COLLEGE 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

from the 

Wallace E. Carroll School of Management 

Faculty and Staff 



S3 -i 



,J ^0 



' mm 











■■ 



FULTONHALL • BOSTON COLLEGE 



470 Advertisers 



Congratulations on your 

achievement 




Bay/Bank 



Member FDIC 



The Business Staff of SUB TURRI 



would like to thank all of the patrons 



and businesses which have made 



SUB TURRI 1996 possible 



THANK YOU! 



From the 

BOSTON COLLEGE CAREER CENTER 
Best Wishes to the Class of 1996! 

Career Center services are always 
available to you as alumni 

•Career Information Network 

•Current Job Listings 

•Career Resource Library 

•Job Search Workshops/ Career Programs 

•Individual Appointments 

•Evening Hours on Mondays during the 
academic year 

Advertisers 471 



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The editors and staff of the 

1996 Sub Turri would like to thank 

the following people for helping to make 

this book a reality... 

• Fr. Joseph O'Keefe, S.J., our Faculty Advisor, for your support and understanding, even o 
sabbatical. 

• Carole Hughes and Ann Morgan, the Deans at ODSD. Thank you for answering all our of on 
questions and helping us plan for the future in the new Student Center. Carole- Best of luck to yo 
with your extended family. We appreciate all the support you guys have given us throughout th 

year. 

• Jostens, Inc., our publishing company in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and all the Employee 
at the plant. Thanks for answering our endless questions and for caring so much about the 

472 Thank You's 



quality of our book. 

• Arnie Lohmann, our Jostens Representative and most valuable asset. Thank you for holding our 
hands as we all learned how wonderful it can be to put together such a great book. Your help, 
support, patience and understanding through all of this was of immeasureable value. 

• Kerry Cashion, our Jostens Customer Service Representative in Winston-Salem. We appreciate 
all the help you've given us and the warm southern hospitality you've shown us when we're in 
North Carolina. 

• Rick Brooks and John Venskus in the Creative Arts Departmen at Jostens. The endless work 
that you've done on our cover and our dividers has been tireless. Once again we've created a cover 
for Sub Turri to be proud of. 

• Joe Durinzi, Mike Durinzi, Valerie, and Dawn at Carl Wolf Studios, Inc. for all the work they 
did to make sure that as many of the senior class as possible could find a home in the yearbook. 
Thanks for all the last-minute requests and all the supplies that you've given to us. 

• Larry, Tony, and Mark, the Carl Wolf Photographers, who spent long hours in our office 
shooting almost 1900 seniors. And a very special thank you to Mark who went above and beyond 
the call of duty by shooting a basketball game for our color deadline. 

• The Heights, especially Kevin Breen and Shawn Mead, who helped us out with last-minute 
pictures and some of the greatest basketball and hockey shots Sub Turri could ask for. 

• The Secretaries and Deans of all the University Offices, Schools, and Departments, for all 

your help scheduling portraits and typing letters. 

• Dennis at University Archives for supporting what we do to record a little piece of history here. 
A special thank you for all the pictures that we requested of Fr. Monan. 

• Parents, Friends, Alumni, Faculty, and Staff for all your support and cooperation without 
which we could not have produced such a high quality book. 

• Tony and the Custodial Staff for the conversation, advice, and the laughs as well as taking care 
of all the garbage we produce. 

• And finally to the Class of 1996 for your cooperation with Senior portraits and your candid 
submissions. Thanks for giving us a chance to record your moments and your memories of these 
past four years. Congratulations and best wishes from the Sub Turri staff. 

Thank You' s 473 



SUB TURRI STAFF 1996 



Bottom left- Lara Farrell, Senior editor, types in senior names surrounded by her many 
cups of coffee. 

Bottom right- Amy Snyder, Senior editor, with Sue Iacono and Annemarie Riley, 
Senior staff, double check mugshots and names. 

Below- "All done!" Brandi Stemerman, Editor-in-Chief, breathes a sigh of relief as the 
last deadline is complete. 

Right- Bev Mather, Sports editor, crops photos at 3AM during one of the many all- 
nighters. 




Bottom- The 1 996 Sub Turri staff in the quad. 

Right- Jyoti Mahapatra, Activities editor, pulls her first all- 
nighter in McElroy. 




Photo by Elena K. Vizvary. All other photos by Brandi E. Stemerman 




anaaer 



<L)ta(j: Dteuin ^Auerr 
Uara ^Oui 
Miicnele JlLorris 



Elena K. Vizvary 



/ would like to thank all the members of my staff who helped me retain most of my sanity 
during the whole yearbook "process. " My special thanks go out to my family for their support 
(Mom-thanks for alphabetizing!, Dad & Krissa-thanks for putting up with the cards on the 
floor overX-masl), my roommate, Shel,for listening to me vent and putting together endless 
letters for me, and last, but certainly not least, the duo ofBrandi (remind me one more time 
how you got me into this mess?!?!?!.....) and Andrea (a.k.a "The Computer Savior" - without 
you, "my" pages would be horrible). Much thanks also goes out to the yearbook staff for your 
endless hours of work to produce what will be a beautiful book. ..leant wait until next year!!! 




Congratulations to the staff members of the Class of 1996!! 

Many thanks are extended for the generosity of benefactors and patrons who have made the 1996 

Sub Turri possible. 
We appreciate your patronage, and hope you enjoy the book! 




M 







1/ 



I 






























\ 
































^^^ 




Elena K. Vizvarv 



Our Beloved Photo Staff... 

Top: Ryan Turner 

Daniel Shomaker 
Kevin P. Breen 
Bottom: 

Pam Ouaknine 
Christine Zanchi 

Mary Bannerman 



Continued.... 
Top: Mike Wong 
Aimy Tse 
Bottom: Kerry Girvin 



Missing: Mary Au, Michael Drage, Nicole 
Griffith, Shawn T. Mead, Rebecca 
Rees, Marc Samale 





Elena K. Vizvary 

Photography Editor 



I knocked on the door of the Sub Turri office my freshman year 
because I wanted to take some pictures - well, I definitely got to tak. 
some pictures, a lot of pictures, and then I got to develop them, and 
then print them, and then print some more. I was a lucky gal - pale 
faced and smelling of chemicals when I emerged from the darkroom 
5, 6, 7 hours later. But, I had a great staff and when I was lost and 
confused about what it meant to be the photo editor there was 
someone there to help me out. Thanks Pete. I want to learn more. 
To my best teacher Geoff, your perfectionism when printing was 
passed down to me. Kevin and Shawn - I knew I could count on yo 
two when I needed pictures at an event. How am I supposed to knoi 
that a picture from the Fleet Center game would be wanted for the 
Yearbook. Kerry, my ever helpful and experienced photographer/ 
roommate, you taught me as much as I taught you. Mike, please 
leave, you were at the office more than me. Thanks. And last but n< 
least to Dan, my fellow late night printer, your help was always the 
best, sometimes I just needed to "chill". To Brandi and Andrea, I 
told you it would get done. Thanks for your patience and only slighi 
aggravation. Just kidding. Hi mom, my note would not be finished.] 
Key Qirvm without thanking you for all your love and advice. I dedicate my 
book to you. You were there when I decided to come to BC, now 
you can see me make my mark. Gregg, Kristin, Andrea, Lindsey, and 
Pat - you always put up with me. I love you very much. Gavin, 
you've been my friend throughout. Congratulations on your graduaa 
tion. Be Good. To all that have helped make the photos in this booc 
possible, to my staff, and Photo Stop, and Carl Wolf- it's finished. 

"All art is a vision penetrating the illusion of reality, and photography is one form of this vision and revelation. " 

-Ansel Adams 



?8 Photo Ed 




The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are 



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O Poets! 
Shamans of the word! 
hen will you recover the 
trance-like rhythms, the subliminaT 
imagery, the haunting sense of 
possession, the powerful inflection and 
enunciation to effect the vision? Throw 
off this malaise, this evasion, this 
attitudinizing and sickliness of urbanity. 
Penetrate to the discord in yourself, the[ 
rootlessness, and induce the trance that t 
will heal the rift within. Shamanize! , 
Shamanize! The American destiny is j 
in your hands. 

- William Everson, 

Birth of a PoeL 






# 1 



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We are all 
fborn mad. Soine^ 

remain so. 
L ~ Samuel 

(Beckett^ 



Student Jjfe 

Barbara Restaino 
Editor 



Staff: 



Interesting is an 
understatement. Insanity is more 1 
like how I would describe my first 
yearbook experience. "I saw the best minds of 
my generation destroyed by madness (Allen 
Ginsberg). " Although they weren't starving hysterical ' 
naked, dragging themselves through the Sub Turri office 
looking for the perfect photo, these angelheaded hipsters were 1 
burning through the night, cropping, typing, printing, writing, 
collaborating, arguing, Yacketayakking, screaming to meet the 
infamous DEADLINE. They vanished into Nowhere Zen Chestnut 
Hill leaving a trail of ambiguous picture postcards o/Gasson Hall, ' 
football games, and school presidents. 

Thank-you is an understatement. First, without the help of my staff, I 

the Student Life section would be literarily lifeless. Thanks a billion f 

to Brandi for hanging in there, dealing with my obnoxiousness, and j 

teaching me to pronounce "pica." PEEEEKA! Thanks to my, 

yearbook guru Andrea for showing me the ropes, listening to my^ 

problems, sneaking onto the Gasson roof, being there to answer j 

all my stupid questions, and especially for being my friend^ 

Thanks to Elena for patiently answering my photo questions^ 

even though I knew she wanted to scream and run the , 

other way. I think you did a stand up job. Thanks^ 

Laura for getting me involved with these^ 

crazy cats. To the other section editors^ 

thanks for providing endless 

laughs. 



Laura Needham 

Jennifer Raterman 

Robyn Winters 



Take nothing but 
pictures, leave nothing but 
footprints, spend nothing but time. 
- (Unknown 



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Activities Editor 



JyotiOVCafrapatra 



a 




Elena K. Vizvary 



Keep 
your 
Face To 
the 
Sunshine 
and You 
Can not 
See The 
Shadows." 
--Helen 
Keller 



Wi 



hat did I get myself into? At the beginning of the year I was disillusioned into believing 

that this job would be smooth, organized, and pleasant , sort of like a tea parry. It turned out I had interrupted 
a game of charades where no one knew how to get anybody else's attention, collectively or alone. 
I had imagined afternoons of editing stories and cropping an abundance of photos, but the reality of being 
an editor meant writing articles on my own and pacing arouund the office hours before a shipment was to 
be sent, praying that somehow pictures would fall out of the sky— cropped and with captions, of course. 
Perhaps it was the pixy stix, pulling an all-nighter, or the lack of oxygen caused by stress that allows me to 
say that being on staff was a worthwhile experience. There is an oddly comfortable sense of belonging in the 
midst of chaos. Persisting towards a goal often feels as good as achieving it. However, all of this assumes 
you first have company to see you along the way and share the same vision. 

Andrea and Brandi, I would still be working on my template if it weren't for you two. Your patience with 
my questions will always be appreciated. Mary's smiles and attitude kept my feet on the ground, and it won't 
be forgotten! My gratitude goes out to everyone who donated pictures and the photography staff as well. The 
rest of the editors have succeeded in putting together fantastic sections and I am proud of all of us for sticking 
it out and finishing. I am dying to hold this book in my hands! 

To all of my roomies, I promise no more coming home hours after I said I would, until next year at least! 

Most importantly my love goes to my dearest mommy, who reminded me that I am still someone's little girl. 

Congratulations everyone who helped out, get ready to do it all over again next year! 



Assistant "Editor Mary Au 

Staff: Samantha SteeC, Jessica Tgidio, %ima 9{asrattafi, Lisa Lovas 

and Melissa McQann 



Activities 



0p o r / s O a / / o r s 








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Thank you - 

To our Staff, Sheila, ('aura, Cathleen,Jen C.,Jodi,Jess, 
JenL./Iinue. Marc.JIeidi.Jeu J.. Qz and Wes,for your all 
of your hard work. We hope you had hook fun in thi 
process. 

'■To Brandi and.jflndreafor all of your help, guidance, 
and all the interesting conversations. Being on an all 
female staff 'certainly had its perks. 

To thefyoti and Barb for the good limes we had. 

To Elena and the photo staff for pulling through with 
us. 

'To Shawn and JCevin at the freights, and Mark at Carl 
Wolf who went far beyond the call of duty. 

To Sports Information - you guys are the best. 

'To all the coaches and players -you are the reason we 
produced this section. Thank you for putting up with 
some of our strange, last minute requests. Everything we 
put in is worth it if you can be proud of what we have 
given you. 



"Sports do not build character. They repeal it" 

-Jieywood ^roun 



Sports are one of the few world-wide common denominators. Tfiey are a fun, healthy way to let go of the rest of life's 
complications. Moreover, sports can be participated in by everyone. 

fiowever, there are some people who have the skill and the finesse to be trite athletes. They make the sports, which the 
rest of us can only play, into great competitions. Still, with hard work, determination, and a love of a game, almost 
anyone can be an athlete. Tlie truly inspirational people are those who take being an athlete a step above the rest. It is 
the class of these people which immortalizes them in our hearts, and in history. 

^Ithletes the caliber ofCal 'Ripkin, Bonnie Blair, Xany Bird, andJackieJoyner-JCersey are the heroes and heroines 
who create the dreams of children and live the dreams of adults. TJiis is the type of athlete which BC strives to develop.. 
In demanding the best of our men and women, we expect the bestfi'om them. Good luck to all our graduating Eagles as 
they move on to the next step in their lives. May you all, athletes and others, reach your own new heights. 

^Oeo jKafner&jlLisfie J saleoas 

Sports Editors 48 1 







Lara Farrell and Amy Snyder 

Senior Section Co-Editors 

First of all, we would like to thank everyone who has helped make the senior section possible. To our TERRIFIC staff members:! 

Sue (the "trooper" and practically our assistant editor]), Annemarie, Kristen, Adelia, Tricia, and Kim. We couldn't have done; 

it without you!!! Thank you so much for all your hard work and dedication]]] If it wasn't for you, we'd still be checking for 

misspellings in the M's and restickering pictures!! Also, we would like to thank our Managing Editor, Andrea. Thanks for al 

your computer help, when we were truly clueless. (Lara promises to throw out all her coffee mugs from now on]). Thank you to 

our Editor-in-Chief, 3randi. You were always thereto get us out of a jam and give us guidance. {Thanks for the comic relief a~> 

4:00am; "It's been a long and painful process...", That Irish guy theory, "I like guys who spell good", and our senior twine with' 

the EXACT same name, and the best one- "Brandi, can we just ask you one little question?..."). Thanks to the entire Sub Turr 

staff; we promise to stop hogging the computers]] Also, we'd like to give a great big CONGRATS to the class of '96]] We wisd 

you the best of luck in all your future endeavors. (If it weren't for you, all these pages would be blank!!) And to everyone who's 

reading this, please know that our hearts and souls went into putting this section together]] 





Lara Farrell 



A&S '96 

Well, 1st I want to thank my co-editor, the "Bird Dog" (oops, sorry Amy!) for being 

awesome and putting up with my wide variety of music (Edie, Toad, Edie, Toad..,). 

Then there's my roomies, the guys across the hall, the girls in A43, Mods 24B and 

8A... thanks for all the memories; I love ya (and LASELL RULES!!!) To all my friends 

from Australia; you were there during the most incredible time of my life and you've 

helped me become who I am- Thanks!! And last (but not least!) thanks to mom (AKA 

"Big Sis"), dad, Kristy, Lissa, and grandma for always supporting each of my 

[random] new interests with enthusiasm! I Love You! 



Amy Snyder 






2 Seniors 



Q)^^ 



CeOM '98 

first of all, I want to thank Lara Farrell, my co-editor. I would've been lost 
without your help!! All the hard work and sacrifices have really paid off. I'll 
never forget the great times we've had working on this book. (All-Nighters, 
laughing over absolutely nothing, and those vending machine breakfasts^. — 
We made it "Bird Dog"!!). Also I'd like to thank my friends and my room- 
mates. Thanks for all your support and understanding (I can resume a 
normal life again guys!!) And finally, a huge thank-you hug to my family. 
Mom, Dad, Dan, and Katie : thanks for always going out of your way to 
support me in everything I do\\ I loveya!! 



-*9 



m % 



"Anything Can Happen.. " and did for Sub Turri '96. 
While there were some pleasant surprises, this yearbook certainly 
had its moments of confusiuon, chaos, & utter pandamonium. But- 
we survived, with a good product to boot. I'd first like to thank 
those from the past: Joe Plurad, Editor Emeritus '95- for your 
patience in answering my many questions, & your eternal concern 
for the well-being of this book and its staffs, present and future. 
Your input with the architects was a great help. I can truly say that 
you taught me everything I know- or don't, & I appreciate the faith 
you had in me -you're a great friend. Susan and Laura Spear, 
Thanks to both of you for keeping an eye out for me and making 
sure I got out of here on occasion. Susan -Your experience sure 
came in handy.. Pete Manis-'95 for fixing our computer, still 
shooting pictures, and teaching by way of example. I appreciate 
everything you have done for us. 

To the Chief, Brandi - Well, we did it! This year was 
tough, but I am sure the pain we suffered will only pave the way for 
a great '97. Thanks for being so open and listening to my ideas- 
"Andrea, I have a question for you..." The project ran smoother 
when it was done as a team- no sane person should have to do this 
alone. Rest assured, we gave it our all, considering . I look forward 
to doing it all over again. (This time I'll try not to scream, though) 

To my faithful section editors, You guys have really come 
a long way- (What' s a peeka?) and I am really proud & pleased with 
the effort you all gave. Barb- You win the award for having 
everything done as closest to "on-time" as possible-the distinctive 
award that it is... I thank you for keeping the office so lively & 
entertaining with your insightful conversations! Jyoti- I never 
thought you of all people would like all-nighters ! Thanks for being 
so cheerful & supportive with a very tough section. I hope you stick 
around next year. Amy and Lara- well, you survived the toughest 
deadline of them all, & I appreciate your efficiency with the 
candids. Your comic relief made the whole process easier -(Darryl?) 
Bev and Mistie- you had your share of bad luck this year with 
Sports, yet I was impressed with the lenghts that you went to in 
order to keep it all together. (Color B-Ball anyone?) Next year will 
be terrific- 1 have complete faith in you ! Beth- 1 hope I didn't scare 
you with Pagemaker, Thanks for feeding us, all your work with 
Patrons, & making sure we had the funds when we needed them. 
Elena, Last but not least, you really had a monumentous task ahead 
of you, & I know you really learned a lot from the experience. 
Thanks for going all out for that shot :), & not complaining about 
what we needed or when we needed it, although you probably 
wanted to strangle us. Many kudos to your staff-I can't wait to see 
next year's shots! 

Outside the office- To my roomates, especially Laura- 
Thanks for the eternal support when I was Sub Terra- and pictures 
when we needed them. Only one more year... I promise! Beth, for 
understanding, as always, Disney, & many wonderful memories, 
(we'd be still on the last deadline if it wasn't for that toner run...) 
also Dave for being my personal BC walking escort. 

On the home front in Jersey... To my Parents, for 
understanding when I disappeared for weeks on end or needed to be 
back to work on the book- 1 appreciate your patience, & support 
which keeps me going. To Barb, -thanks for being the eternal 
inspiration-much love, Sis. 

Finally, to all who helped in big or little ways- Carole 
Hughes at ODSD, Dennis at University Archives, Mark and all 
from Carl Wolf, Kevin and Shawn from the Heights for Sports pics, 
Tony-for your many insights, Jodi, (for fixing the monitor) Chuck 
& Frank, (Congrats! -I appreciated the encouragement.) Rush, (for 
that Grace Under Pressure album) Bruce, & the music that got me 
through, and everyone and anyone else whom I may have 
overlooked, trust me, your aid & input was greatly appreciated. 
Now... who's interested in sticking around for Sub Turri '97??? 




Andrea J. Ritola 



Managing Editor 483 




Brand i E. Stemermani 
Editor-in-Chief 



Wow. We really did it. And time really does fly when you're having fun. But I look at where we started at the end of August and I look at where we ari 
now and I'm almost speechless. (I know- hard to believe, huh?) We've all learned a lot- especially me. And what a ride it's been. I couldn't have done i 
without each and every one of you. At least while keeping some semblence of sanity. We made a pretty good team. So... for all those who put up with mi 
deadlines, problems, schedule, life, and just genuinely wacky self- thanks. I may not say it all the time, especially at 4AM, but I love you all... 

Andrea- We actually did it kiddo! Time to escape outta here and actually see daylight! 1 year down- 1 to go. I never could have made it this far without 
you. The little men in the little white coats would have taken me away long ago ! Thanks for always being there to help me remove my foot from my mouthl 
We make an awesome team. ..Elena- 1 know its been a rocky year especially at the beginning. Thank you so much for everything that you've done. Yob 
can finally breathe fresh air and see the light of day . . .Beth- Living together one year and working together the next. And it all started with an innocent "Wannn 
be our business manager?" Thanks for putting up with me and my last-minute demands. Till next year...Bev & Mistie- Fleet Center and Irish men. We hao 
our share of interesting conversations. Bev, have I got a story for you! ! ! I'm so glad we became such good friends this year.. .Lara & Amy- Amy the "Birdc 
dog" and Lara the coffee guru. Meet Darryl and his other brother Darryl. And W.G. and his "little" problem Thanks so much for the endless hours that yon 
spent trying to find every senior a home... Jyoti- I'm so honored that you spent your first all-nighter trapped in here with us! ! Thanks for all your patience 
and your eternal work to contact every organization on campus... Barb- "Peeka!" I'll never forget the Head of the Charles Ducks. Thanks for working youi 
butt off and entertaining us in the process. What an artist... To the photo staff- Becca, Kerry, Mike, Mike, Shawn, Kevin, and the rest of the crew- Thankk 
for all the beautiful shots of Boston, the best moments in sports, and those endless activities pictures... Joe & Pete- Thanks for holding my hand througL 
all of this. Without you, this book would have never made it. Actually- without you, I wouldn't have made it. 



To the gang- Laura, Theresa, Tom, Domingo, Heather, Cathy- "unsuck Lou" and a cabin in Maine. That's the only way to do it! ! A girl couldn't ask foi 
better buds! ! I'll miss you all more than you can imagine. Best of luck out there in the real world. Till the next cast party... 

To my roommates in 531- Yun, Cathleen, and Jen (and Brian too)- You have been my sanity through everything. Is anybody else's pretzel turning ther 
yellow or is it just me? Make sure you duck in the shower. Thank you for always being my reality check on life and putting up with my crazy schedule 
I really do live there- 1 swear! ! Pounce anyone? I love you guys! !... Carl- Whaat...? We've had a lot of fun- you and I. Kendall Square? Good luck in Lav 
School- you really won't need it. I hope we always stay close enough to be a part of each other's lives. You're a great friend!Mom and Dave- My suppor 
system. Thank you for always being there for me. Even in the blizzard when I couldn't get home. I love you more than I can say- even from a thousand 
miles away... 

As a final thought- 1 have a newfound admiration for any editor- past, present, or future that has stood in my shoes. Yearbook brings out the best qualitie> 
in all of us. And a few we never knew we had. Best luck to the graduating class of 1996. Thank you for giving us so much to record in history. 

...You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universt 
is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusioi 
of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy.- The Desideratt 



Love always- 



484 Editor-in-Chief 



^£)A4uaA* \*S 




The 1996 edition of Sub Turri, the 
Yearbook of Boston College, was printed 
by the School Products Division of Jostens 
in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The 
84th Volume, consisting of 496 pages, 
had a press run of 2000 copies and was 
printed from April 1-3, 1996 at the 
Winston-Salem plant. 
COVER: The cover, endsheets, and 
dividers were designed by Rick Brooks 
of the Creative Arts Division of Jostens, 
State College, PA. All theme and cover 
ideas were the result of the combonation 
of the creative talents of the editorial 
board and Rick' s amazing artistic talents. 
The cover is Maroon #490 on Mission 
grain with a special mix of Gray #436 and 
Black #326 to produce the lovely silhoutte 
and detail of Boston College. The silhoutte 
was inspired by the view from Edmond' s 
Hall Room 826S. The lettering was done 
by Copper Foil #3 8 2 and with the beautiful 
Rapier Fontek Font. Embossing 
techniques were also used in the cover 
design. 

PAPER: Pages were printed using 100% 
black ink with pages 1 — 16 on 1001b. 



gloss paper and pages 17 — 496 were 
printed on dull stock 801b. paper. The 
endsheets are Smoke Gray with Maroon 
#194 print. The Opening, pages 1-15, 
were printed using Matte Black ink with 
lacquer spot varish on the process photos. 
Pantone dyes and ink were used for spot 
color throughout the book. 
DESIGN: Opening, Closing, Dividers, 
Current Events, and Academics were 
designed by the Editor-in-Chief, Brandi 
Stemerman and the Managing Editor, 
Andrea J. Ritola. All sections were 
designed by the repective section editors: 
Jyoti Mahapatra, Activities; Lara Farrell 
& Amy Snyder, Seniors; Barbara 
Restaino, Student Life; Bev Mather & 
Mistie Psaledas, Sports. All pages were 
created on the Quadra 660AV, Ilci, or the 
Mac Classic II, using Aldus Pagemaker 
5.0 and Jostens' Yeartech Templates. All 
pages were printed on a Hewlett Packard 
4M V Laser Jet printer with toner supplied 
from Staples courtesy of the Bates' 86' 
Monte Carlo- what a car! The Endsheets 
and Dividers were inspired by Rick Brooks 
of Jostens. 



TYPOGRAPHY: All Body Copy and 
Folios were 12pt. Times, Captions were 
lOpt. Times, and Photo Credits were 6pt. 
Times. The fonts and sizes of all other 
type including Headlines and Subheads 
were determined by the section editors 
and within the wonderful world of Adobe 
fonts. 

PHOTOGRAPHY: Senior portraits 
were taken by Carl Wolf Studios, Inc., 
401 Elmwood Avenue, Sharon Hills, PA 
19079. Phone: 1-800-969-1337 or 1338. 
Carl Wolf Studios was contracted by 
Boston College to be the Official 
Yearbook Photographer for the 1 996 Sub 
Turri . Current Events photos courtesy of 
RM Photo Service, Inc.. FDR Station. 
P.O. Box 452, New York, NY 10150. All 
other photos were taken by the Sub Turri 
photography staff under the direction of 
Elena Vizvary , Photography Editor. Any 
other photos were submitted by the 
kindness of the students or various 
University departments. All color photos 
were submitted on Fuji transparency 
film and developed by assorted vendors 
in Boston. Black and white photos were 



i K. Vizvaiy 

taken, developed, and printed by the photo 
staff using Kodak T-Max and Ilford films 
and papers. The photos were taken by 
cameras and lenses manufactured by 
Nikon, Canon, Quantum, and the Mamiy a 
corporations. 

Copyright, 1996, by Sub Turri, the 
Yearbook of Boston College. No portion 
of Sub Turri may be reproduced or 
transmitted in any form or by any means, 
electronic, mechanical, digital, or 
otherwise, without the expressed, written 
consent of the current Editor-in-Chief. 
Sub Turri was produced entirely by a 
staff of undergraduate student volunteers 
and receives no funding from the 
University or the Student Activities Fee. 
Sub Turri generates revenue from year- 
book sales, ads, and donations. Please 
direct all inquiries to: Sub Turri, the 
Yearbook of Boston College, McElroy 
Commons, Room 103, Chestnut Hill, 
MA 02167. Phone: (617) 552-3493, 
Business: (617) 552-0898. 



Colophon 485 



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Closing 487 







488 Closing 




Closing 489 



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Closing 491 




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Closing 493 



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/or Jioston 



\Jor juos/on } '/or /iosion, 
IcJe sing our proud refrain ! 

Jor /Joslon, \Jor /ioston, 
Ois Wisdom } S earlhlu fane 

Z/or fte re all are one 

And their hearts are /rue, 

Ana (lie lowers on the Jlet'ahts 

yZeacn lo Jieau '/? 7 s own nine. 

L/or '/Josion, Jo/' /joston, 

O/'f/ne ecfios ring ay a in! 



/or /ioslon, Snr Mas/on, 

f/iu aloru is oar own ! 

Sor /joston , /or /joston, 

Jis here that Jrai/i is [now/?. 

And ever with /he /sfiohl 

Shall thu heirs oefouna % 

/it iime shall oe no more 

And thu wor/e is crown \J. 

'/or /)osion, /or Jioston 

/or J'hee ana /hine alone ! 





















7/ai/f Alma /Hater! 



:$% Closiris 



Jfaif! 'J [ma /Hater! 

Jn (j praises we sin a. 

J~onalu thy mem 'ries 

round our heart still clina. 

^Juide of- our youth, thro ' 

thee we shall prevail ! 

/[ail! Jltma Tiialer! 

/fait! 7111 /fail! 



If ail! Alma Water! 

[jo! on the heicyht, 

/ roudlu thu tow *rs are 

raises for tne j\ig£l. 

ztoois thu masiei\ 

/[is thaw thu sole avail! 

J fait! Jllma Mater! 

J fail! Alt /fail! 



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